• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
IndyOfComo

In-game GUI...maybe?

7 posts in this topic

This may just be a terminology issue for me...  My next task on our game is to make a screen where the player can see some information on units and do some manipulation if he wants. The various information should be grouped an arranged in an easy-to-understand and clear method. And that method will need a style which fits the game and isn't hard to read.

 

Now, I'm thinking there has to be library out there already for this kind of stuff.  It can't be as inflexible as making a separate png or jpg for each and every sub-window on the screen. Certainly there's a way to say this style(like a font), rectangle, in this dimensions. It's possibly simple, but even if it's not it is certainly frequently necessary. So I google for...GUI's? I'm not sure that's right, because when I do I get ugly office stuff like this (not.jpg), and not things like (yes1.jpg)(yes2.jpg).

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It may be worth checking xWinForm and Ruminate, both C# afaik. Can't really tell you how much trouble it would be to break down the appearance of the interface created with these.

 

If you want a really specific look, you may end up having to writing one yourself.

Edited by dejaime
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The two interfaces that you showed would need to be created using art assets. Something like http://sourceforge.net/projects/primitives2d/ may help though.

 

XNA has a drawString ( http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb447673.aspx ) method you can use for drawing text. Those graphics could be using bitmap fonts as well. http://blogs.msdn.com/b/shawnhar/archive/2007/04/26/bitmap-fonts-in-xna.aspx

Edited by shadowisadog
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do some gui, screen manager, event and button tutorials for your preferred language so you understand how you can get things done. It's not really hard to make a simple but effective system on your own. If you can make a descent game you are more then capable of creating a menu. Again there are many ways to go about this i'd suggest you create a base Menu class and a base Button class and derive all your different screens and buttons from there. If you have not done so learn some about inheritance, especially with menu's it is very practical to use this knowledge since menu's function very repetitive.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do some gui, screen manager, event and button tutorials for your preferred language so you understand how you can get things done. It's not really hard to make a simple but effective system on your own. If you can make a descent game you are more then capable of creating a menu. Again there are many ways to go about this i'd suggest you create a base Menu class and a base Button class and derive all your different screens and buttons from there. If you have not done so learn some about inheritance, especially with menu's it is very practical to use this knowledge since menu's function very repetitive.

 

I know I could do it, but that's the point of libraries and sharing, isn't it? To not spend time recreating basic components over and over again. Now, if making segregated windows/areas within the game screen is something people only do for themselves and don't share, so be it. I can save myself some time and stop looking for it. But I don't see such a development being so awesome that one would be competitive about it and not share it.

"I have silver, round-cornered boxes to group my on-screen info. My boxes will bring all the players to my yard!! And the other developers will just have to figure it out on their own!  Muahahahahahah!!!"

Yeah, I just don't see it nor understand it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The two interfaces that you showed would need to be created using art assets. Something like http://sourceforge.net/projects/primitives2d/ may help though.

 

XNA has a drawString ( http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb447673.aspx ) method you can use for drawing text. Those graphics could be using bitmap fonts as well. http://blogs.msdn.com/b/shawnhar/archive/2007/04/26/bitmap-fonts-in-xna.aspx

 

How would you get the boxes out of a font?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It may be worth checking xWinForm and Ruminate, both C# afaik. Can't really tell you how much trouble it would be to break down the appearance of the interface created with these.

 

If you want a really specific look, you may end up having to writing one yourself.

 

Yeah, I dl'ed Ruminate yesterday, haven't gotten to look at it much yet, busy all last night.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guarantee those "rounded boxes" were drawn by an artist and are likely a png file with transparency. Each game has a different look and feel. Now you can use the xWinForm toolkit you showed that looks like office, and skin it to match the look of your game, however you still need the art skills to make it look how you want.

 

GUI toolkits mostly handle the technical side of things such as handling user input, storing data structures for the widget, ect. The look of the widget is typically a matter of style. For instance Qt (a popular widget toolkit for making c++ apps) has stylesheets. Even in HTML you have CSS to style websites how you want..

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0