• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Diy Dezign

Newbies at Game Dezign

2 posts in this topic

Many people start playing games and one day they start saying to themselves hey I want to do that for a living or just to brag to your friends about your game design skills. Later you find out you actually need to study 4 years C++ programming, high level Maths and hope and pray you going to get a job. In a nutshell its hard but don't give up because I am here to tell you casual gamers out there about the best way to get started in this type of career or for fun the best programmes, tutorials and script that's the most popular to learn from.

 

Follow my Blog

 

http://diydezign.blogspot.com/

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Moving you to our "Your Announcements" forum.

 

 

Do you have any experience that you feel qualifies you to offer advice to others?

 

 

 

You stated that "Python mostly belongs to the PS3 format".  Apart from the fact that this doesn't really make sense -- perhaps you could clarify what you think you mean by "belongs to the PS3 format" -- it's also incorrect in that Python has no particular relation to PS3 at all.  It's very viable on many other platforms, and is probably most commonly used on desktop computers.  

 

You then go on to say "just like Ruby it is a tricky language to master".  While mastering any language is a notable achievement, both Python and Ruby are generally considered to be very approachable to beginners, with other languages such as C++ are considered to be trickier.

 

In your section on Unity3d, you started by saying "we can't all be masters of programming languages", which is probably misleading given you can't actual create games in Unity3d without programming unless you purchase an additional third-party add-on to allow the use of a visual scripting system.

 

 

You mentioned Photoshop as "the only programme that is needed for designers".  In Japan the term "designer" is typically applied to what western studios call "artists" or "graphic designers", and Photoshop is just one of several popular tools commonly used by artists.  For a designer (in the typical western sense of the term) however, Photoshop may not necessarily be used much if at all, with Word Processors and mind-mapping software often being very important tools.

 

 

 

I don't want to be discouraging, but are you sure you're ready to be offering advice to others on these topics?  If you wish to continue, you should probably do a little more research and proof-read before publishing further posts. Good luck! smile.png

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with Jbadams, not a lot of depth here in this post, but I appreciate you providing encouragement to others and trying to consolidate some basic tutorials for these platforms. 

 

I am not sure what your skill level is at, but your post almost feels like you yourself are trying to break through that learning curve and this is a method you are using to help you wrap your head around the different platforms and methods to publishing a game. If that is the case there are some great tutorial links to some of these platforms like Unity in the forums, one great link since I have it handy is, http://walkerboystudio.com/html/unity_training___free__.html.

 

Otherwise if you have some experience with one or more of these platforms and are looking to contribute, I would love to see some more tutorials coming from you. Even if you are not an expert, these 'tutorials' can be good for others and yourself as a learning mechanism, as long as the information is accurate of course. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0