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Nicholas Kong

Question about game portfolio and sprite sheets

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I have seen games use a spritesheet in their games while the game I made does not use a spritesheet. Instead my game uses individual images that are loaded into the game rather than what most people would do is to figure out the subimage of the spritesheet that are they are interested in drawing into the game screen which involves some hardcoded offsets of x and y coordinates which can be exteremely messy code.

 

Is it not the whole point to programming the game with clean code as possible? This was the reason why I did not go for the spritesheet approach.

 

I am still in the process of building up my game portfolio which has been a good 6 months or so. There are things I want to share in my game portfolio with a game company but half of the artwork I do not own. However, the game demonstrate what I can do with thecopy-righted artwork from a programming standpoint.

 

Can I still include copy-righted art into a game portfolio then?

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I have seen games use a spritesheet in their games while the game I made does not use a spritesheet. Instead my game uses individual images that are loaded into the game rather than what most people would do is to figure out the subimage of the spritesheet that are they are interested in drawing into the game screen which involves some hardcoded offsets of x and y coordinates which can be exteremely messy code.

 

Is it not the whole point to programming the game with clean code as possible? This was the reason why I did not go for the spritesheet approach.

 

Well you definitely don't have to hard code the values. In the 2d games I've worked on we've always used an animation tool to determine the image rects for each frame, and this was exported to file.  We wrote our own editor so we could tie events to certain frames a bit easier but I know there are a few free tools that will do this from a sprite sheet. I'm sorry but I can't remember any of the names at the moment, try google. But if you prefer having your frames as individual images then go for it, do whatever works best for your project.

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which involves some hardcoded offsets of x and y coordinates which can be exteremely messy code.
 
Is it not the whole point to programming the game with clean code as possible? This was the reason why I did not go for the spritesheet approach.

There is no reason they need to be hard-coded.

 

  1. A tool normally generates this data for you.
  2. If you don’t want to make a tool you can still make a database manually and load that.  There is no reason to put data inside of code.

 

 

I would not send copyrighted material to a major company.  Not that they would report you but it may bring into question your standing on the validity of copyrights, non-discloser agreements, etc.

 

 

L. Spiro

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which involves some hardcoded offsets of x and y coordinates which can be exteremely messy code.
 
Is it not the whole point to programming the game with clean code as possible? This was the reason why I did not go for the spritesheet approach.

There is no reason they need to be hard-coded.

 

  1. A tool normally generates this data for you.
  2. If you don’t want to make a tool you can still make a database manually and load that.  There is no reason to put data inside of code.

 

 

I would not send copyrighted material to a major company.  Not that they would report you but it may bring into question your standing on the validity of copyrights, non-discloser agreements, etc.

 

 

L. Spiro

 

Ah I see. No problem. Looks like I need to create more art now. Thanks for the replies!

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I have seen games use a spritesheet in their games while the game I made does not use a spritesheet. Instead my game uses individual images that are loaded into the game rather than what most people would do is to figure out the subimage of the spritesheet that are they are interested in drawing into the game screen which involves some hardcoded offsets of x and y coordinates which can be exteremely messy code.

 

Is it not the whole point to programming the game with clean code as possible? This was the reason why I did not go for the spritesheet approach.

 

Well you definitely don't have to hard code the values. In the 2d games I've worked on we've always used an animation tool to determine the image rects for each frame, and this was exported to file.  We wrote our own editor so we could tie events to certain frames a bit easier but I know there are a few free tools that will do this from a sprite sheet. I'm sorry but I can't remember any of the names at the moment, try google. But if you prefer having your frames as individual images then go for it, do whatever works best for your project.

 

Interesting. I will have to google that.

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Try using something like TexturePacker or Zwaptex.  These will generate a spriteshert and also an xml file with all the offsets you need.

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