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ahmadge74

Differences between programming for consoles and PC

8 posts in this topic

just wondering the language difference and the game engine difference ??

also how hard is to move a game from console to PC or PC to console

 

note: am new to programming

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Modern consoles (XBox One, PS4) are designed more like PCs than past consoles (360, PS3).

Unity supports the Wii U and will probably support XBox One and PS4. Porting a game to them will probably simply be a matter of certification, testing (on a dev kit for PS4 or Wii U, XBox One retail console will end up doubling as a dev kit I hear), and obeying a few rules (like I have heard Nintendo doesn't want you constantly writing to storage memory).
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With regards to the above post, this a good use case for writing interfaces, and accentuates the importance of keeping code reusable and separate.
As you've stated that you're new to programming, I might recommend starting with the PC platform, the reason being that there are far more resources for this area of game programming than any other platform (I'm including Linux and Macintosh into the PC platform) as they've been around for the longest and are the most accessible to indie developers.

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As you've stated that you're new to programming, I might recommend starting with the PC platform, the reason being that there are far more resources for this area of game programming than any other platform (I'm including Linux and Macintosh into the PC platform) as they've been around for the longest and are the most accessible to indie developers.


Still, I find the idea of making a game for a console easier than the idea of making a game for a mobile device despite the resources available. Mobile games are something I have seen new people try and either succeed or fail at.
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The main difference is that code and libraries are all confidential, so you cant go to forums ask for help. its a dark and isolated word ._.

 

Ive programmed for PSP with the official devkits. Even compiler questions, basic stuff to low level ones, you have to relly solely on the docs or mattes that know as much as you, which dont always help.

 

;P well, not if you have hodgmans level experience and skills

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I know this topic is a half year old.

However, starting a new one to reply to this one would be rather silly.

 

To get to the point, I've been programming on a Nintendo 3DS for a while using official dev kits and such.

While I can't say a word about the API's, tools, code, etc. used (other than the fact it's in C++ because what else do you expect?), I can say PC programming is far and far easier than 3DS programming.

It's mostly because you need to set everything up and make stuff yourself on a 3DS, while on a PC most of that already got prepared for you.

Even making a simple "hello world" will take hours to make on a 3DS for this reason, while it takes seconds on a PC.

 

But in return the help and support from Nintendo is like no other: helpful, friendly, well explaining and lightning fast.

Without them I wouldn't even know where to start.

 

Summarised, PC is definitely easier if you don't want much help. Even though I'm most likely NOT going to switch back to PC any more because I still find 3DS programming much more fun.

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