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ahmadge74

Differences between programming for consoles and PC

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just wondering the language difference and the game engine difference ??

also how hard is to move a game from console to PC or PC to console

 

note: am new to programming

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Modern consoles (XBox One, PS4) are designed more like PCs than past consoles (360, PS3).

Unity supports the Wii U and will probably support XBox One and PS4. Porting a game to them will probably simply be a matter of certification, testing (on a dev kit for PS4 or Wii U, XBox One retail console will end up doubling as a dev kit I hear), and obeying a few rules (like I have heard Nintendo doesn't want you constantly writing to storage memory).

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The language is the same, the libraries are different.

 

C++ is still C++, no matter if you are developing on the PC or on a console or on a mobile device. The libraries for input, rendering, audio, and other systems will be different on each device.

 

Moving an existing game can be very easy or very hard, depending on many factors like what libraries are used and how the code uses those libraries. For example, if every game object includes much code to directly render itself in Direct3D, migrating that code will be difficult. But if all the code using the Direct3D graphics library is isolated in one small subsystem then migrating that code will be much easier.

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With regards to the above post, this a good use case for writing interfaces, and accentuates the importance of keeping code reusable and separate.
As you've stated that you're new to programming, I might recommend starting with the PC platform, the reason being that there are far more resources for this area of game programming than any other platform (I'm including Linux and Macintosh into the PC platform) as they've been around for the longest and are the most accessible to indie developers.

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As you've stated that you're new to programming, I might recommend starting with the PC platform, the reason being that there are far more resources for this area of game programming than any other platform (I'm including Linux and Macintosh into the PC platform) as they've been around for the longest and are the most accessible to indie developers.


Still, I find the idea of making a game for a console easier than the idea of making a game for a mobile device despite the resources available. Mobile games are something I have seen new people try and either succeed or fail at.

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A very important difference is that if you want to make PS4/Xbone games, you need to be a company, and get in touch with MS/Sony and jump through the required hoops to becoming a licensed developer. Then after developing your game, you need to ensure it complies with endless checklists of technical requirements, because MS/Sony don't want buggy/inconsistent software on their platforms, and then you've got to pay 10's of thousands of $'s in submission/testing fees so MS/Sony can check that you've ticked all the boxes.

This was the same on PS3/360, except that now they're letting developers "self publish", which means we can do the above steps with MS/Sony directly, instead of going through a publishing company as a middleman.

The 360 also had XBLIG/XNA, and the PS3 had linux, both of which let he general public make software for free/cheap without the red tape, but instead with severe technical limitations.

Beginners really shouldn't hope to jump into that deep-end straight away...

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The main difference is that code and libraries are all confidential, so you cant go to forums ask for help. its a dark and isolated word ._.

 

Ive programmed for PSP with the official devkits. Even compiler questions, basic stuff to low level ones, you have to relly solely on the docs or mattes that know as much as you, which dont always help.

 

;P well, not if you have hodgmans level experience and skills

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I know this topic is a half year old.

However, starting a new one to reply to this one would be rather silly.

 

To get to the point, I've been programming on a Nintendo 3DS for a while using official dev kits and such.

While I can't say a word about the API's, tools, code, etc. used (other than the fact it's in C++ because what else do you expect?), I can say PC programming is far and far easier than 3DS programming.

It's mostly because you need to set everything up and make stuff yourself on a 3DS, while on a PC most of that already got prepared for you.

Even making a simple "hello world" will take hours to make on a 3DS for this reason, while it takes seconds on a PC.

 

But in return the help and support from Nintendo is like no other: helpful, friendly, well explaining and lightning fast.

Without them I wouldn't even know where to start.

 

Summarised, PC is definitely easier if you don't want much help. Even though I'm most likely NOT going to switch back to PC any more because I still find 3DS programming much more fun.

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While I can't say a word about the API's, tools, code, etc. used (other than the fact it's in C++ because what else do you expect?)
Half-Life 3 confirmed.

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