Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
beans_in_space

Next step after learning C++ basics

This topic is 2112 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Hello everyone

I'm new to the forum and glad to see that this "field" of programming has such a huge community.

I've been interested in game programming for a long time but was also aware of the effort one has to put in since it's

(in my opinion) on of the most demanding (and time consuming) topics.

 

During studying I enjoyed C++ the most, sometimes getting nuts with those pointers but kinda interesting though.

So, I'm close to finish working through the C++ basics and tried to get a feeling would could be the next step

 

Currently I'm reading Beginning DirectX 11 Game Programming by Allen Sherod. It's a good book but covers also

a lot of topics that seem to my "advanced" or just out of my field of understanding.

 

So I tried to grasp some other parts that are also included in Game Programming , like engines and this sort of thing.

When I attempted to find some information about working on a own game engine, most the comments were like

"none actually works on an engine on it's own since it's too complex"

 

Right at the moment I'm a bit confused on where to work on.

For me it feels like a huge step from C++ basics to working with directX11.

The problem is, I don't see thr "red thread" and I'm also not quite sure whether this thread even exist in this area of programming.

 

So what would you think to work on next?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
Work on a small 2D game, building an engine if needed. Something larger than Pong but simpler than Final Fantasy VI.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whom ever just voted me down,  How about an explanation on why!!!   If you disagree with my or anyone else "OPINION" the state why.
My above "Advice" is based on personal experience in the learning curve  and I see nothing wrong with it.
 
Voting someone down for BAD code is one thing.  Voting them down because your experience may be different is simply CHILDISH.  especially when you offer no opinion of your own.


(polite)My impulses got the best of me and I rated you down because of your lack of carefulness when speaking on what art is. I am majoring in Game Art & Animation in college and if art was that simple, it wouldn't be my major. Graphics/art is important to a game because it can affect our perception of it and more.(polite)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Learn to use SFML2.1 to make 2d games.  Learn how to make OOP your biznich.  Learn how to make great design.  Learn to write code that is easily readable, highly maintainable, and extendable.  Once your code is beautiful and elegant, then consider stepping up to 3d, maybe use ogre3d/irrlicht or even harder openGL/directx.

 

Also consider picking up a GUI library like Qt ( my favorite ), wxwidgets, or gtk, ect...

Edited by EddieV223

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm going to apologize for rating Poigahn's post down. I did it because I didn't want to spam this thread disagreeing with him. Personally I think he was being a bit unprofessional, but so am I considering I seem to have upset someone with my negative vote.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As Eddie said, start out with an existing 2d engine.  SFML, SDL, pick one and make a couple simple games, then make a couple more complex games.  This is a useful (and for most people, necessary) stepping stone to 3D environments.

 

Work on keeping data and logic separate.  Then work on keeping data out of code and in separate files (initially as text, later as binary).  Familiarize yourself with the STL, not only as a tool to utilize in your programs, but as a guide for developing your own tools.  Try to reuse as much code as possible from your previous games in your new games.  Initially, you'll find very little code you can reuse (or at least reuse easily), but this should get you thinking about how to write your current code to make it more reusable in the future.

 

Learning the syntax of a language is really only the first step to becoming a developer.  The next step, and it's a step you'll be taking your entire career as a developer, is to learn how to use that syntax not just to accomplish your current goal, but to make accomplishing future goals as easy as possible (sometimes those future goals are to come back and support/maintain this current accomplishment).  The beauty of this second step though is that it is largely language agnostic.  What you learn in this life long step will carry over fairly easily to the other languages you'll eventually learn.  And any remotely successful developer inevitably becomes multilingual.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OT: regarding the ratings thing - these things tend to even out, e.g. if I see a reasonable post that has been voted down, I'll normally vote it up again. I hardly ever vote down a post, and then only if it is trolling (in which case it is better just to report it because downvoting reduces your own rating, whereas reporting gives you a rating boost as long as it isn't a spurious report, so save reporting for serious trolling). I have voted down a post which gives wrong information before, although I have also upvoted someone after downvoting a post because they realised ther error and retracted the original post later on.

 

This kind of thing happened to me, I annoyed someone in this thread http://www.gamedev.net/topic/648513-new-is-flawed/ and ALL my posts got downvoted, however they all got upvoted again within a day.

 

If you accidentally downvote a post you can cancel it out by upvoting a later post by the same user anyway.

 

Moaning about downvotes is usually a recipe for disaster though ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As other mentioned, I would not jump into the lower level API sets like DirectX or OpenGL, start with a good solid Multimedia API like SFML.  You can easily create windows, draw images, access input, and, in no time you'll be controlling sprites moving on the screen.  From there, you can make a lot of simple, fun games.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

GameDev.net is your game development community. Create an account for your GameDev Portfolio and participate in the largest developer community in the games industry.

Sign me up!