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Shane C

Wasting potential, and seeking cloning

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To make things even more confusing, the games I truely enjoy are often games no one else likes, and I mean the type that get reviews of 4-5/10. So it's kind of a bad idea for me to use them.

 

That's even better because that means there is room for improvement. As an exercise you could find out what makes that game suck, then clone the good parts and improve the others, replacing or adding new elements. For example, I like a crappy game called Prision Tycoon. The idea behind this game is interesting and there are plenty of opportunities to make it entertaining, but it seems the developers made several bad decision during execution and also release the game in a broken/unoptimized state. So it can be greatly improved and many people play this broken game because there isn't anything similar, so there is also a market.

 

 

+1 to all of the above, escept, there's Prison Architect now, so the market for THAT specific gameplay isn't as easy to grab. But you're likely to find other niches. As a matter of fact, as an indie, your one way to success (and not be compared to AAA publishers) is to find a niche you like.

Pick one of the games you like, which has a very bad review.

Look up the reviews (the ones that bother to be 'grey' and tell you what sucks/rocks).

Focus on the potential you see (why is it fun for you?).

Check the 'downsides' you see, and the 'downsides' the reviews see. Can you assess them in one way or another?

 

Build a game with the above ingredient, and if you're lucky, you could be the next Mojang (of course, the odds of that occurring are very low, but indie sleeper hits are not unheard of).

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If you want to lock this thread, you can. I'm not really sure what I was trying to achieve with it. I think I wanted feedback on making a game like Final Fantasy VI, but the discussion didn't go that way.

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I like Construct 2 for RAD though it's a difficult paradigm shift from event driven programming or procedural programming I'm use to.

 

I think almost any program could be written in Construct 2 but it wouldn't come out naturally- I would have to force it.

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...

 

Recently, I feel like making another game though. A game that is like Final Fantasy VI but just enough not like it to not get sued. I feel that cloning a game is the best thing to do since all the money was already spent on the talent and you can use that collective talent as a guideline for how your game is, and hopefully make it good. Whereas if you make an original game, you risk making something sloppy or unprofessional. At least at my skill level, which is somewhere around novice.

...

 

I'm not sure what I want to do. I want to make something without spending code on a waste of a game. So I come to the creative minds here.

 

Allow me to offer some encouragement, then.  JPRG-style games are both common and in demand.  Common because they are popular, but in demand because GOOD ones are relatively scarce.  They are much like books where most can be consumed in a dozen hours time, but if they leave the consumer with a positive experience, it gets recommended to the community at large by word of mouth and can become popular.  The Final Fantasy series has a solid fan base and (I'm assuming) would love to see more games made with that level of quality in the gameplay and storytelling.

 

As or technology, you mention the Ouya as if it's a standalone system.  Because it runs on Android, you immediately have an entire mobile market to also consider as your customer base.  There may be another layer of UI programming required for touchscreens, but to access the expanded customer base, it would be a worthwhile effort.

 

And remember... it's not a failure until you say it is.

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