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Icebone1000

Explain me this 50k Kickstarter project funded in 13mins and 40 secs

19 posts in this topic

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1744629938/mars-attacks-the-miniatures-game

 

Ok, it looks really cool.. but I dont get, 13 minutes and 50K (now over 300K, still 28 days to go))? I cant even find viral marketing or anything..

 

Its amazing, only 2000 backers, most went for buying the game and stuff backing 300$ !. Jeez, most backing was for 300$!!

(at least backs with pledges, why they dont show the overall backing %?) 

 

Whats going on? What kind of sorcery they are using to get all that money so fast?

 Is "Mars Attack" theme full of fanatic fans?

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One thing that people selling online through a third party will do is buy their own stuff through that third party. So if I sell something on Steam I might have all my employees buy a copy of that item through Steam to get it to show up on the top sellers list or at least somewhere slightly higher when someone sorts by popularity. Similarly if I already had some funding or potential funding and wanted to kick start my kick starter I might have employees make my product look more impressive by contributing to my kick starter. In either case most of the money comes back to me and the share that the third party gets can be written off as marketing expenses. I don't know that's what happened here, but it's something to keep in mind when you see something with large volumes on open. It could be real or it could be a marketing ploy.

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I was looking at their site and saw a bunch of really successful kickstarters.

 

I think they are using kickstarter differently.

 

Instead of making a game, putting it on sale, and hope for success, they create a kickstart project, so ppl give then enought money both for making the game and buying it already. So its better because they dont have risk of expending money with no return. They will do just as much as ppl ask..

 

Or not..does it makes sense? 

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It's also worth noting that certain types of product attract people who will happily spend large sums of money to make them happen, for example board games and especially miniatures.

It doesn't hurt that the business side of e.g. manufaturing board games and miniatures is well-understood, so kickstarters for those kinds of projects often have a firm grasp on how much money they will need - and how much additional money they will need for various stretch goals - so the risk of failing to deliver the product is relatively low compared to other kickstarters.

In the case of board and miniature games, the combination of low cost to produce and a potential backer base with sizeable disposable income and a strong desire for new products means that kickstarters for them have a good chance to get funded quickly and greatly exceed their initial amount.
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Mars Attack was a movie during the 90's I believe, I would say millions of people have heard of it. Kickstarter is as much about name recognition as it is about the project itself.. Look at the rise of the Kickstarter developer celebrity like Chris Roberts Star Citizen or Double Fine Tim Schafer.. etc. Also with Kickstarter it allows small underserved segments of the community ( be it gaming or other ) to endorse their own niche industry, in this case tactical movie branded board games..

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Those $300 pledges is some kind of "New York Comic Con edition", I'm guessing they were very successful with their IRL advertising at that event.

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1. Action figures are hot sellers.
2. People look for exciting board games.
3. They probably had good connections.
4. Going by the amount of money, they seemed to make people believe in them. If people believe in a project, they will tend to donate their money to it.
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Very Impressive.

 

If you like to see a breakdown of its kickstarter stats check out Kicktraq here. Its trending to between $800k and $1.4million ohmy.png

 

At first glance gaining $170k on its first day looks a bit suspicious, particularly when you factor in its avg pledge vs backers ($38,000 vs 200).

 

However digging a little deeper reveals over 1300 backers in the first day and judging by the 600 backers in the $300 reward ($195k) I'd say its pretty clear that these guys have a very strong and loyal core following that are actively watching the company negating the need for heavy amount of promotion, at least for day 1 kickstarter. I think this is probably backed up by the fall in both backers and pledges for almost a week afterwards, at which point it raises again no doubt due to some form of marketing.

 

Overall it just goes to show how important it can be to have a fan base for your product/company and that maintaining their respect can provide huge benefits such as seen here. I also suspect its the type of market that really plays up to fans and fan support, not to mention that board games themselves have been under going a revival of late and have always been popular.

 

Of course it should also be noted that whilst it is a large amount of pledge money, the basic game itself is costing $75 so its not exactly a cheap product so it would be expected that the money raised would be high.

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I'm not too surprised. Figurines are expensive physical objects that all require work. At the very least a painter has handled each one to add finishing touches so the quality control is rigid.

 

It's a completely different market from software. If you sold hand crafted furniture, each set would be worth thousands. If you had to make 200 sets of furniture, you'd have to hire 50 employees to get it done on time, based on expectations.

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They started advertising their projects weeks before the kickstarter launch. They probably had hundreds of fans lined up wanting to buy it, before it even appeared on kickstarter, which explains the first-day figures.

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They started advertising their projects weeks before the kickstarter launch. They probably had hundreds of fans lined up wanting to buy it, before it even appeared on kickstarter, which explains the first-day figures.


I'd +1 this post if it had a +1 button.
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http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1744629938/mars-attacks-the-miniatures-game
 
Ok, it looks really cool.. but I dont get, 13 minutes and 50K (now over 300K, still 28 days to go))? I cant even find viral marketing or anything..
 
Its amazing, only 2000 backers, most went for buying the game and stuff backing 300$ !. Jeez, most backing was for 300$!!
(at least backs with pledges, why they dont show the overall backing %?) 
 
Whats going on? What kind of sorcery they are using to get all that money so fast?
 Is "Mars Attack" theme full of fanatic fans?


As mentioned they already did a very successful Dreadball Kickstarter which, by most observations, contained quite a good bit of good bang for the bucks. Mantic also made themselves a good name before Kickstarter by slowly growing themselves to where they were.

Also note that this is a game that not only appeals to board game fans but also to miniature lovers (not common action figures despite what Shane C believes them to be). Good miniatures are always expensive and the quality of them looks pretty good (as usual for Mantic).
Add to that the fact that I cannot remember another company doing similar Mars-attack type of miniatures (there will be tons of smaller one-man companies around but that means invariably either a small range or worse quality, quite possibly both). Also, they seem to be coming in plastic which a lot of people find much easier to work with than metal.
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Very Impressive.

 

If you like to see a breakdown of its kickstarter stats check out Kicktraq here. Its trending to between $800k and $1.4million ohmy.png

 

At first glance gaining $170k on its first day looks a bit suspicious, particularly when you factor in its avg pledge vs backers ($38,000 vs 200).

 

However digging a little deeper reveals over 1300 backers in the first day and judging by the 600 backers in the $300 reward ($195k) I'd say its pretty clear that these guys have a very strong and loyal core following that are actively watching the company negating the need for heavy amount of promotion, at least for day 1 kickstarter. I think this is probably backed up by the fall in both backers and pledges for almost a week afterwards, at which point it raises again no doubt due to some form of marketing.

 

Overall it just goes to show how important it can be to have a fan base for your product/company and that maintaining their respect can provide huge benefits such as seen here. I also suspect its the type of market that really plays up to fans and fan support, not to mention that board games themselves have been under going a revival of late and have always been popular.

 

Of course it should also be noted that whilst it is a large amount of pledge money, the basic game itself is costing $75 so its not exactly a cheap product so it would be expected that the money raised would be high.

 

This is the best answer. I really get frustrated when people attribute success to vague stuff like "Action figures are hot sellers" and "certain types of product attract people who will happily spend large sums of money." I don't mean to sound argumentative, I just think that stuff is a way to avoid the question of "how do we emulate that success?" by attributing it to forces external to the successful party.

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I asked a friend who purchased one of the limited early bird slots (no idea which one), and her reply was this:

 

If I had to guess, I would say that most people opt for higher tiers because they really offered better and better value at each tier. Like, the cheapest tier that included the game is $75. But for $100, you add on $50 worth of add-ons. And even these add-ons are at super reduced prices. And for $150, you get the game plus $125 worth of reduced add-ons, and so on. They really preyed on people's craving for a good deal I think.
And a lot of people may turn around and sell stuff like add-ons when they get rare.
Because once the Kickstarter ends, much of that stuff will be unavailable. OR available but at much much higher prices.
People want to get in on a good deal while they can.

 

 

And it also ties in to how well board games are doing these days over computer games. Board games don't crash, rarely require you to upgrade your kitchen table. If something breaks you can make a stand in piece, and if a mouthy pre-teen is spouting racial slurs at you you can reach over and smack him up side the head.

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And it also ties in to how well board games are doing these days over computer games. Board games don't crash, rarely require you to upgrade your kitchen table. If something breaks you can make a stand in piece, and if a mouthy pre-teen is spouting racial slurs at you you can reach over and smack him up side the head.

 

Was any part of this paragraph serious?

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And it also ties in to how well board games are doing these days over computer games. Board games don't crash, rarely require you to upgrade your kitchen table. If something breaks you can make a stand in piece, and if a mouthy pre-teen is spouting racial slurs at you you can reach over and smack him up side the head.

 

Was any part of this paragraph serious?

 

 

I don't know about you, but I've never had a board game crash or require me to upgrade my table. Unless you count moving to the floor as "upgrading my table." I've also used proxies for missing pieces a number of times. I'd say he's pretty serious.

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And it also ties in to how well board games are doing these days over computer games. Board games don't crash, rarely require you to upgrade your kitchen table. If something breaks you can make a stand in piece, and if a mouthy pre-teen is spouting racial slurs at you you can reach over and smack him up side the head.

 

Was any part of this paragraph serious?

 

 

Mostly serious. But really, part of why board games are popular and sales are booming is because they're [i]not[/i] video games. Want to play a multiplayer game? Call your friends over and have one of them bring a pizza. You make a night of it. You don't have to wait for a patch to download, if some mechanic makes no sense and doesn't work for you and your friends, then anyone with half a brain can rewrite it. If something breaks, you can usually find something to fix it in short order without having to wait for a developer to get around to solving your problem. They are real objects, and when the maker decides they no longer want to support the game then all your stuff doesn't suddenly vanish and become worthless because someone shut down the login server.

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That paragraph appeared to smack of irony. I thought it was imperfect humor, with slapstick comedy, and an arbitrary reference to board-game success stemming from a lower quality experience of all similar software entertainment.

 

@ Luckless mellow.png

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