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Hawkblood

Would like artistic help with my game

8 posts in this topic

I am at the point that I need some help. Here is a screen shot:

[attachment=18391:testImage.jpg]

The textures look great, but they are not mine (not all of them). I have an idea on how to make them, but each one take so long to make, that I find myself devoting an entire day (or longer) making them. The ones I make aren't even that good.

 

Does anyone know:

--where I can get a HUGE amount of textures (free and royalty free)

--what (free) software is best for making complex textures

--resources (beyond the sticky's on the forum) to help speed up the process

 

 

 

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Does anyone know:
--where I can get a HUGE amount of textures (free and royalty free)


Maybe try Turbosquid. But they might cost something.

I know there are sites out there. But be careful with the Terms of Use.

--what (free) software is best for making complex textures


Free:
GIMP
Paint. Net

Paid:
Photoshop (good, much used program)
Filter Forge (haven't tried) - http://www.filterforge.com/
Substance Designer (haven't tried) - http://www.allegorithmic.com/products/substance-designer
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ShadowFlar3 has a good point.  The site cgtextures.com does allow commercial usage, as long as the textures are integrated into the project, and not easily accessible alone.  A game is a fine case of this.  Many other websites on the other hand indeed don't allow more than personal use.

 

The other point about the textures fitting together is also valid, but depending on how easily you can either learn or hire someone to do proper art for your specific case, it may be easier to grab the free textures and modify.  I think there is enough variety that they can be found and modified to fit well enough for most games, but it won't be as easy as simply downloading them most likely.  On the other hand, it may be easier than learning to create the textures yourself, depending on what software you know, how quick you learn, etc....

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Hi,

 

Once you spend a few hundred hours at it, making textures will take a fraction of the time that it did when you began.  I am amazed myself at how quickly I can whip together a nice texture for something, sometimes in a matter of minutes, that used to take a lot of hours.

 

I use GIMP for most things and actually could get by with only using it for 95% of textures, as for rasterized rendered ones.  Inkscape is often used by me for vector graphics, some of which are later converted to rasterized JPG, BMP, and so forth.  Once you get into designing vector planes in your games, then you will open a whole new level of capability for quality, even if most other surfaces are textures.  Eventually, procedural generated surfaces will make your game appearance reach very sophisticated quality level.

 

In the meantime, continue looking into these things and expanding your knowledge base.  I'd focus on layers, including transparent background layers, gradient filters, fonts, and lean toward more Alpha Channel inclusion in your game after a few months, maybe only weeks.  Down the road you may use Blender or other software to generate procedural surfaces, sometimes in combination with normal and bump maps.   All in due time!  smile.png

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Thanks, all, for the responses. I have GIMP already, but when I first started using it, I decided it was too difficult to use (as compared to Paint.net) so I abandoned it for the other. I have, since this post, been trying it out again. It's not as easy, but I think it will do the job once I get used to the interface......

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You are free to use whichever you like, as long as you're comfortable and don't feel limited by the software. I was just mentioning Photoshop and Gimp as popular examples so if you wish to improve on them there are plenty of tutorials. But I'm sure there's some for Paint.NET and other software as well.

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The GIMP is similar to Photoshop, but it does have much less of a userbase. Instead of looking for game texture tutorials for the GIMP, look for game texture tutorials for Photoshop and adapt the directions to the other program.

 

I believe the most important step in getting good looking textures is using the layering of one or more different textures with blending modes to obtain a unique composite. If you don't do this, everything will look soft and artificial.

 

http://www.psionic3d.co.uk/tutorials/shiphull.html (Written Tutorials - Photoshop)

http://wiki.polycount.com/TexturingTutorials

http://texturing.blogspot.com.br/

http://www.cgsociety.org/index.php/CGSFeatures/CGSFeatureSpecial/the_top_ten_tips_of_texturing

Edited by Kryzon
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