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Techkid

What's the best way to learn?

10 posts in this topic

Personally I learn very fast on computers as I have been studying java over the internet for about 3 months. I know that I'm new to the language but I'm wondering if it's worth it. Seriously like can I get a job as a java game programmer? what most people are saying to me is to learn c++ but I don't want to because I haven't learned java and I don't want to ditch it. Anyways, my point is that I'm in grade 10 and wondering what the best way to learn java game programming. I don't really like watching video's because all you have to do is copy code and listen to the same stuff over and over and the youtube videos are split up into so many videos it gets annoying. So if you know java and have known it for a while please reply to this topic and tell me how you learned best. I have a java book but it's mostly on C++ and only the last chapter is on java. Honestly I think I should buy a new one... If you know any books on java game programming please post a link because I want to get so good at java I can program a 3d game by myself and a designer. My future goal is to make a working multiplayer game like minecraft or runescape. Thanks for spending the time to read this post and have a great day! 

spkbup.png

^this was my first game in java... :/

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The good news is that you have at least two years before you really need to look for a programming job. Most people will not hire people in high school, is the sad truth of it.

I'd stick with Java for at least a year and then learn C++ as well. That way, if a job calls for one or the other, you have both. And correct me if I'm wrong, but there are jobs that call for Java.
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I must say that I started off with C, in college, then learned C++, and then Java.

It took me around a week to be able to program properly on java (reviewed code), surely due to my previous experience with C++. My friends that gone from Java to C++ took over a month, but it can surely be done with no hassle.

 

My advice?

Take Java to the next level, as you said you don't want to learn C++ prior to it. Use it for the higher level learning, architecture, modeling, object-orientation (being all similar to C++).

I used the Java How to Program book to learn the basics of the language. It suited me just fine, even though I jumped over all the theory and only read the practical part.

 

If, in the end, you are faced with the need of C++, whatever the reason, well, all you'll have to learn is the syntax, since the higher level of the development is practically the same. The only point you'll probably struggle is some more tricky building procedures and pointer and memory management (or simply get a library like boost).

 

The good news is that you have at least two years before you really need to look for a programming job. Most people will not hire people in high school, is the sad truth of it.

I'd stick with Java for at least a year and then learn C++ as well. That way, if a job calls for one or the other, you have both. And correct me if I'm wrong, but there are jobs that call for Java.

I personally find more work using java even though I like to define myself as a C++ programmer (i'd say, 3:5 proportion). C++ usually pays me more, but also takes a little longer; always pays better for the work-hour though.

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Java is used for some games, and for some game tools.  It's also used fairly extensively outside of the games industry.  If you're a good Java programmer there will be jobs available, and other factors (your education, any experience you can demonstrate, how well you interview, who your competition is, etc.) will determine whether or not you're able to actually get those jobs.  If you're looking to make games independently or as a hobbyist you can use any language you like, so Java is a fine choice there.  It's sometimes used in professional games, so there are some jobs available, but you'll probably find that the majority are using other languages; often a mixture of C++ and various scripting languages.

 

It's very rare for a programmer to only ever use one programming language, and most professionals will learn and use many throughout their career.  You still have plenty of time to learn additional languages before you'll even be considering professional work, so as long as you're able to learn it isn't hugely important which language you're using right now.

 

 

 

The best way to learn programming is to write programs!  Use your books, online resources, video tutorials, etc. to learn the basics of how the language works, and how any libraries you want to learn work, and then set your own goals and try to write your own programs.  Don't worry about doing things "properly" or whether or not you're doing things the most efficiently, etc.; you are going to write some really bad code, some pretty average code, and maybe a tiny bit of good code, but this is how you'll get the experience to write great code in future!

 

 


I have a java book but it's mostly on C++ and only the last chapter is on java.

What book is that?  I wouldn't say you have a Java book at all there if the majority of the text covers a different language!

 

 

 

If you just want to work by yourself as an independent developer then Java is just fine and you should absolutely keep going with it -- some great games have been made with Java (Minecraft, Puzzle Pirates, Spiral Knights, and others), and there's no reason you can't learn to do the same.

 

If you want a job in the industry, I would probably recommend eventually learning C++ as well, but there's no reason you need to worry about that at this stage, as you still have plenty of time before you'll be looking for jobs -- you'll need to finish school and go to university first!  In this case, I would suggest sticking with Java until you're comfortable with at least creating some smaller-to-medium complexity games (you should definitely be able to create Pong, Breakout, and a platforming game at the least) with Java, and then perhaps consider picking up C++ as a second language.

 

 

Hope that helps! smile.png

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Do you mean can you get a job coding games with Java or just a job in general?

 

As close as 5 years ago if you wanted to get any job in games then the only language you needed to know was C++.  Things have changed.  Comercial games are now being developed with Javascript, Objective C, Java, Flash, lua, monkey script, HaXe and many more.   Some of the big F2P games have hundreds of server side developers using PHP, Java, Scala, Closure, Python, Ruby on Rails and dozens of domain specific languages.

 

 

Of course if you mean can you get a job programming AAA console and PC games in Java then probably not, but outside this relatively small area then yes.  However you are in 10th grade so buy the time you are looking for a job you will probably have learnt several other languages and also the requirements in industry will have changed.

 

If you mean any Job and not just neccessarily a games job then definatly stick with Java or cross over to Scala as outside of games C++ jobs are pretty thin on the ground.

 

If you search youtube for Bjarne Stroustrup 5 languages every programmer should know it might give you some insight.

 

 

Also for your friends telling you to ditch Java just point them in the direction of minecraft, puppygames, several thousand Android games or the Java4k competition.

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For Java have you seen the Oracle tutorial? It is very comprehensive and most accurate reference that you can find for Java.

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thank you to everyone who replied but I'm wondering if you can get a job as a java game programmer. Also when I get the hang of java programming I will probably learn c++. I know the basics but I can learn that later. The book I was talking about in my post was this picture...

5np0e9.jpg

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thank you to everyone who replied but I'm wondering if you can get a job as a java game programmer. Also when I get the hang of java programming I will probably learn c++. I know the basics but I can learn that later. The book I was talking about in my post was this picture...

The book I told about is by the same authors: Java How To Program; I think it's on its 9th edition.

They have some great introductory books. If you ever need to go deeper you'll need other books though.

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Yes, it's possible to get a job programming games with Java.

You should probably learn C++ as well though, because games jobs requiring C++ are currently more common and will likely remain so for at least the near future; you will almost certainly end up learning several more languages to at least some extent during your education and career anyway.

You would probably be best to focus on Java in depth some more before moving to an additional language, and you've got quite some time before you'll be ready to apply for jobs, so there's no need to rush.
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I'm not sure about every school, but at my school you can take two years of Java at any grade. Your school might have a similar program, if not for Java probably some other C based language, which should still help you out some.

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Languages are tools, a programmer is going to have to be at least lightly familiar with quite a few languages, and its a good experience to know multiple indepth anyway.

I'm not sure why people actually suggest Java for game development, realistically there just is not much of a market of Java games out there and I almost feel like solely blaming Minecraft for the surge in people targetting Java as a games platform. It's seen some light for applet games but it is usually completely crushed by alternatives like Flash in that regard, and as a desktop games program it just has a lot of practical negatives.

Personally I like to recommend C# since it is similar to Java in a lot of ways but has a lot more game support, XNA being a great example. C++ is the de-facto if you want to get into AAA big studio development of course, for different reasons.

I guess my response comes down to: is learning Java bad? Of course not, every language teaches you new things. Should you stick with just Java and bust your butt to get a game dev job using just Java? Honestly, no, you shouldn't. In fact I wouldn't even bother unless you actually find an offer to get such a job using Java. Its worth being prepared to use different languages, especially in a competitive field like game development.
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