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tom_mai78101

Acne: How does it affect your lives?

11 posts in this topic

I believe that many of you had at least one case of acne in your life. I would like to know how does it affect your life? Does it has an adverse affect in your social life?

And what are your opinions on acne if you were to see a person having one?

I am asking for opinions from others because I never knew what others may think of me when:

1. I am currently having one, and they had just met me. They see me with a case of acne as normal.

2. I am not having acne, and they had just met me. In the future, when I actually have one, they would see me as abnormal, and would sometimes wished I look like who I am before.

Confidence is the key, one would say.
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My acne has never been terrible but I have had it and might have a little of it now. When I had it the worst, people sometimes pointed it out, but other than that, I've had no real problems.
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And what are your opinions on acne if you were to see a person having one?

 

I don't really have an opinion on people with acne.  It's a normal biological process, especially amongst teenagers, and doesn't reflect who the person is.  If I were to see an adult with acne, I might for a moment think that it's uncommon to see acne in someone out of their teens, but that would be a purely observational thought.

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I used to have acne and I tried all kinds of stuff to get rid of it but it only made it worse so one day I decided not to think about it anymore so I got rid of my mirrors and that's how I got rid of it quickly.

 

I have one friend who has pretty strong acne and it bothers him and he puts all kinds of chemicals in his face and I told him to do what I did but he didn't listen. I don't care about it though because I don't care what my friends look like.

Edited by froop
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I've had moderate acne all my life, and will continue to have it until I eventually go through menopause (ugh don't want to contemplate that) because the acne is a side effect of an inherited condition I have.  But yeah, pretty much the same as Froop and LennyLen, I don't care about it; I could cover it up pretty well with makeup if I wanted to bother, but I don't.  I've occasionally dated guys who had acne, or shaving rash, or rosacea, or psoriasis, or stretch marks (no, not on their face) and I even have a friend who has vitiligo.  Yeah perfect glowing milk-and-strawberries skin is beautiful (or perfect glowing blue-black skin, or coffee-and-cream, or vivid, classy tattoos), but skin isn't at the top of my list of important parts of one's appearance.  The only time acne actually grosses me out is if someone has a monster whitehead that looks like it's going to explode any minute, because they neglected to drain it so it could start to heal.

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I don't get much acne, but I do have chronic eczema. For the most part people don't talk about it, but there is the occasional "Smart-Alec" that tries to tell me to put some lotion on it or stop scratching or something.....that get's me aggravated. For the most part, when somebody has acne or eczema or some other skin condition, don't tell them about it, because they are usually pretty aware of it.

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I got some, and I guess it affects your life as much as you care about it. Some things that have helped me:

 

1. Never wash your skin with cream/bar soap, use liquid soap instead.

2. Wash your skin before going to sleep.

3. Don't touch your skin.

4. Don't eat/drink fatty or sugared food.

 

Also humectant creams after washing seem to help the skin healing faster.

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My back could tell you. Though it is not terrble that much. I have seen my friend having much richer one but he got rid of it after puberty completely, but I didn't. I am still planing to hit an imunologist to extract antidote for the bacteries I cannot fight on my back. I used to have sort of the thing in my hair, but after Vichy shampoo and Node G I got rid of it.

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Never had acne, even as a teen I had fairly clear skin, I did get the odd spot in stupid places.

 

Personally the best way to clear skin is working out hardcore or at least enough to sweat, I haven't looked into it but my face after exfoliating is no where near as good as my face (or body) after showering from a workout. I should also mention that I am a vegetarian, drink only water / green tea and avoid grain as much as possible, so that could help.

 

I also moisturise with olive oil, it requires A LOT of maintenance to work correctly as you will break out with spots if you use it like moisturiser but it is at least for me far more effective at keeping me smooth, clear and hydrated than any cosmetic, it just requires more effort to manage

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and avoid grain as much as possible

Yes. More people have a gluten intolerance than they think. I went on a no gluten for 2 years and my eczema and acne both really cleared up, but now I am itchy and pimply again, because cookies taste so good!


I also moisturise with olive oil, it requires A LOT of maintenance to work correctly

I also tried olive oil....personally it only moisturized my skin for about 10 minutes and then I was dry again, the same with most creams too. Really the only stuff that works for hours on end is ointments like Aquaphor and Vasaline.

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Both my sister and I had pretty bad acne while my brother never had anything at all really. My sister is 4 years older than me so she went through it before I did it. At first I never did get any. Always washed my face and took care of my skin my entire life so everyone kept saying I would never get it. I didn't think I'd have a case of it either until I turned 17. It all of a sudden popped up. Kept taking of my skin like normal and didn't worry. But it kept popping up, it kept spreading, then it became worse. I fought with it until I was 19. I kept eating normal and "healthy" like everyone says you have to do. I changed all kinds of soaps, everything to see if that would help. Nothing. It finally started to have a personal affect on my life at around 19. I didn't want to look at myself, I had no confidence in myself and no motivation at all. Finally my sister told me about how she fixed her issue when she had a horrible case. She told me to go see a doctor that specializes in that type of stuff only and she promised they'd have something for me.

So I made an appointment. They looked me over asked me questions and I answered them. The they said "ok, we have a pill we can put you on. For women it does have serious side affects if they're pregnant and they listed the side affects for men. I had to get a blood test every month before I went back before they could write a new prescription. They then literally said "this pill is almost like a magic pill. You take these pills once day for about 3 months and I will just about guarantee you your acne will be clear and you'll have literally no issues the rest of your life." So I took it, not expecting much or believing what they claimed. Three months later? I was 100% acne free! Three years later? I am still 100% acne free.

I never believe in a "magic pill" but to this day I swear this pill is almost like a magic pill. It fixed all of my issues with acne just like that with zero extra effort from me to take care of my skin. Just the Normal wash, no special soap nothing. I still to this day am amazed at how fast a simple pill fixed all my issues.

I can't remember what it is called now for some reason, and the pill is very rarely prescribed to women due to the side effects that can happen, but they do prescribe it to some men when they agree to a blood test every month.
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The nightmare from our teenage years...totally destroyed my social life! O_O

 

I think drinking plenty of water and eating healthy is the way to go...

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