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Ballistix

Noob Game Programmer

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Hey guys,

 

I'm new here and what brings me here is a need of advice which will point me in the right direction.

 

I've been dying to develop a game for quite some time now, I have a complete design (about 100 pages) of details about the game and everything in it, including the type of art and music used to make it.

 

Now, I realize that I will have to hire concept artists, animators, musicians and such to make this project a reality. While I consider myself to be quite good with the design, I need to learn at least one specific role to make this game come true. I chose programming. 

 

The reason is because while I have a great imagination, I am not a blessed artist as a lot of people out there are. 

 

I was always far on  the science/math side... even my career (ultrasound physics). I am pretty sure Programming would be the best choice for me.

I'm not saying that I will be successful with it, but at least I want to try.

 

Well, as I understand, artists make the visual parts of the game, such graphics, music and animations, while programmers are the ones who make it all work together, please correct me if I am wrong.

 

I'm interested in developing my first game which would be very similar in the style as Don't Starve, Machinarium... which are point and click, as well as keyboard controlled games. This game will also offer a multiplayer experience online. 

 

I am a complete noob and never even touched a code of any type. I want to learn the best language which will be suited to the above style/type of a game, but also could be utilized to make more advanced 3D FPS, Online games in the future.

 

Which programming language should I learn?

 

Let me know if there is any more questions you need in order to answer this question.

 

Thanks a lot guys.

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Most video games, small and large, are written in c++. There are also lots of *free* engines out there that are written in c++.

 

However, some people believe it's better for beginners to learn an easier programming language and then switching to c++.

 

I personally learned flowcharts, then psudo code, then c++.

 

Thus, I can't tell you what language you *should* learn, you have to decide that yourself. Do some research and check your needs. It's also a good idea to learn programming logic with flowcharts or psudo code and then moving to actual programming.

 

Hope this helps.

Edited by gezegond

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If you're new to programming and you're looking for an easy entry point, check out this here: http://www.thegamecreators.com/?m=view_product&id=2000

 

It's what I started out with when I first got into game development. It's a very powerful and easy to use programming language based on BASIC, and it's completely free to use until you wish to sell your games (in which case I think you only need to pay like 50 bucks for a license).

 

Just to give you an example, the following code will display a rotating cube on the screen:

sync on
sync rate 60
backdrop on
hide mouse

make object cube 1, 10

do
   yrotate object 1, wrapvalue( object angle y(1) + 4 )
   sync
loop

The language is powerful in that it allows you to do a lot of things with very few commands. You don't have to worry about any of the underlying troubles of rendering things, or how to load meshes into memory, or how to load and play music, it's all built in already. You get to focus more on making games this way.

 

DarkBASIC Pro uses DirectX 9.0c Aug 2007 for its graphics (2D and 3D), so it will only run on Windows. With that said, I heard WINE runs it smoothly on Mac and Linux.

Edited by TheComet

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Most video games, small and large, are written in c++. There are also lots of *free* engines out there that are written in c++.

 

However, some people believe it's better for beginners to learn an easier programming language and then switching to c++.

 

I personally learned flowcharts, then psudo code, then c++.

 

Thus, I can't tell you what language you *should* learn, you have to decide that yourself. Do some research and check your needs. It's also a good idea to learn programming logic with flowcharts or psudo code and then moving to actual programming.

 

Hope this helps.

 

The way I understand this is that C++ will be sufficient for my simple game and also be able to deliver for more advanced projects later down the line, but it is not easy to learn. I prefer learning one language over switching from easier one to more difficult one. 

 

Any recommendations on what software to use in order to learn programming logic with flowcharts / pseudo code?

 

Thanks a lot!

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You might want to rapid prototype your design from your document. The quicker the better for the game.

I hear you. Well, as soon as I can put something together, then I sure would do that as a move along with the progress.

 

Thanks for a great advice.

Edited by Ballistix

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Any recommendations on what software to use in order to learn programming logic with flowcharts / pseudo code?

 

I personally just used a pen and a piece of paper for drawing flowcharts as they are really easy to draw.

 

I just searched the internet for good flowchart tutorials but to my surprise I couldn't find any. I learned flowchart in a programming class so I'm not really sure how you could start self studying it.

 

Here's what I did find, I hope they're useful for you:

 

A basic explanation of flowcharts and a simple real life flowchart:

https://www.moresteam.com/toolbox/process-flow-chart.cfm

Some sample flowcharts: (read the title, try to draw a flowchart yourself, then compare it to the one on the page)

http://schoolnet.gov.mt/joe.vella/Flowhome.html

Some basic programming tutorials, comes with flowcharts:
http://beginners-programming.blogspot.co.uk/2007/11/welcome-to-beginners-programming_21.html

 

Note that flowchart symbols are not the same in these tutorials (hence why I said I couldn't find any *good* one)

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So want to create a game huh, learn C# and use Unity (unity3d.com). It's the quickest way to build up your prototype. Since Unity doesn't really mind the code to be messed up to finally show things up (disregard the performance), you can actually get the sense of the game you want to create.

 

If you want to go deeper that may take a very long time (since you said you're having a career now) rather than prototyping a game first, you can start with C++. Find some C++ basic books (Accelerated C++, The C++ Programming Language, etc.), and begin with game development books, like Game Coding Complete. This one takes patience if you just started. Enough math and physics help you in dealing with geometries, shaders, and physics, but the coding architecture and design takes experience to finally able to scale.

 

In your situation I really recommend that you use Unity instead, it saves your time if you want to make a game. If you want things to go custom and faster, then you can go to C++ stuff after that if you're interested.

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Yes, I am not too concerned about getting the prototype right away. I realize I will need quite a bit of extra money saved to hire artists to do the art/music and such. I'll practice the flowcharts to get an idea and get these books, and take my time to learn the C++. To be honest, it sure looks pretty damn complicated, but.... just as with everything of a different nature. Pretty much just like learning a new language!

 

Thanks for help, guys.

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Yes, I am not too concerned about getting the prototype right away. I realize I will need quite a bit of extra money saved to hire artists to do the art/music and such. I'll practice the flowcharts to get an idea and get these books, and take my time to learn the C++. To be honest, it sure looks pretty damn complicated, but.... just as with everything of a different nature. Pretty much just like learning a new language!

 

Thanks for help, guys.

Good luck and looking forward for your game! smile.png .. It's very complicated but it'll pay you off. C++ is as if the mother of many modern programming languages. When you know it, it's easier to use Java/C#/JavaScript/etc., because the concepts are all there.

Edited by mychii

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If you're not looking to go into game development  as a professional, as in, one day work for the big dev companies, then I suggest going with something like Unity/C#, as a big engine like that is much easier to learn and is complex enough for your needs. C++ is way too complicated for something other than AAA games, IMHO.

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 I am a complete noob to game development AND programming, but I have made several scenes that can be turned into complete AAA looking games with a bit better skill. 

 

And as a noob, I think I can help. I have posted several links to some tutorials I made on programming. Just check my profile for them. And I also mention that I use the Maratis3D engine that uses the LUA programming language (easy to learn). It also uses C++ for coding for the engine itself (it is open source and free).

 

I do have a good understanding of all sides of game development simply because I have been into 3d modeling for quite a while. I stayed away from programming because people made it seem too difficult. Now It's like bread and butter to me after I sat down and gathered my thoughts on it and wrote a tutorial. 

 

C++ really isn't complicated. It works like every other programming language. The thing that makes it look complicated is its syntax. The way C++ does things seems foreign when you are coming from something like Python or Lua where the syntax is more intuitive. 

 

One reason big companies use C++ is because they are doing big time data management and they want things to run fast. C++ is fast. Think about all the data that Apple has to manage on their iPhones. Thus they use C++.

 

Not all programming languages serve the same purpose though. For instance, PHP is used for servers. Javascript is used for websites. You wouldn't use Javascript to run a server.

 

 

That was my old post. After reading one of your other posts, and re-reading this one. I have a suggestion you might like. I see you have a background in ultrasound physics (had to look that one up). I think you should use the knowledge of your background to do something. 

 

Most games we play on ps3 xbox etc, have no real value. Mostly for entertainment. But there is so much opportunity in the gaming market for educational games. 

If people made games where you have to perform a medical procedure on a patient or something like that, I would play it. These games could even be used for training in professional fields. 

 

Programming doesn't even have to apply to games or basic software. You could even use programming to program a machine that has something to do with ultrasound physics. The programming part isn't all that hard. The math part is where most people loose out. You already have that. 

 

Just a suggestion. 

Edited by Tutorial Doctor

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