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noatom

game programmer job test

9 posts in this topic

So everybody knows that if you get a hr recruiter's interest,they will give you some kind of technical test.

 

Can someone post some example questions they think,or that they encountered while trying to get a job as a programmer?

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I'm not prepearing,i was just curious.I found a page on the web with a guy that applied for a programmer position at Ubisoft.

 

He had to solve a problem like:

you get an array of strings.You have to tell how many palindroms are in it.

Edited by noatom
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He had to solve a problem like:

you get an array of strings.You have to tell how many palindroms are in it

 

As ApochPIQ stated, this is a case of applying basic algorithms to solve a problem. ApochPIQ's list is pretty consistent with what I've seen and the questions I ask when interviewing.

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The best way to prepare yourself for interview questions is to start right now.  Familiarize yourself with logic and math problems, all of them.  Project Euler is a good place to start.  I ask algorithmic questions to interviewees too, and my questions vary in difficulties.  No one here can tell you what the questions are, since that vary by company and the person interviewing you.

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The best way to prepare yourself for interview questions is to start right now.  Familiarize yourself with logic and math problems, all of them.  Project Euler is a good place to start.  I ask algorithmic questions to interviewees too, and my questions vary in difficulties.  No one here can tell you what the questions are, since that vary by company and the person interviewing you.

 

Thanks for the answer,i'll look into project euler.

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Since my team got laid off, I've been interviewing at game & tech companies over a two week period. I have had over 10 technical interviews and a few 5 hour+ on site interviews. You could get asked anything from TCP/IP stack questions to solving DNA matching (no joke, I've been asked this at a game company.

 

My general recommendation is to study the basics and you'll be able to figure out how to solve anything on the spot.

 

Algorithms:

   Algorithm Paradigms (divide and conquer, greedy, dynamic programming, linear programming, exhaustive search)

   Selection Algorithms

   Sorting Algorithms (quick, merge, heap, insertion, radix)

 

Data Structures:

   Data Type sizes (int, char, long, double) and maximum capacity

   Big O of insert, delete, find min/max, search, and get index for popular data structures (arrays, binary trees, heaps, maps)

   Know the back end of popular data structures (red/black tree, hash table, linked list) and how they are implemented

 

3D Math:

   vectors (what they are) and how to add, subtract, multiply scalar, multiply other vectors, etc

   magnitude, dot product, cross product and when each one is used

   angle between, orthogonal angle, perpendicular angle, etc

   matrices and multiplication, transformation, rotation, identity, etc

 

General networking, general OpenGL, C++ programming riddles (i.e. find if linked list has loop, palindrome, pairs, numbers that add together and equal ?), frameworks, current programming engines, current programming techniques, pipelines to and from artist and projects you have worked on

 

I live in the Bay Area where recruiting and interviewing are both very cut throat. Things may be a little easier where you are from. Also I should point out that, after years of trying, I have never landed a game development job outside of mobile f2p, so other people may be able to help with PC/console interview strategies that work (because mine do not). But these are the questions that you should expect to see.

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Well,since I opened the topic,I should've mentioned that I'm not really looking for a job,but for an internship.Not sure if that changes anything.

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It doesn't. Applying for an internship is the same as applying for a job.

 

Yes, I still interview interns the way I'd interview a regular candidate. You are competing with other interns rather than graduates/experienced workers, but you still need to distinguish yourself from the pack. You should prepare the same way.

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