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supersilentninja

Whats is the easiest programming?

15 posts in this topic

I new to coding and i dont know what im best at. i want to make games, gamemodes, mods and addons. 

HTML is only for website design and i know how to use it, my skills at HTML 6-8/10.

i read through some lua pages and didn't understand anything, the reason was that they didnt explain what a function do, they didn't explain the main stuff. they didnt explain it on a easy way either so how am i suppose to understand?

 

I have used 1-2 months to figure out how Lua works, still dont understand. i looked up after easier way to learn and understand Lua but it still not good explained. 

 

Im also reading a book called: 3D Game Programming All In One (Premier Press, 2004) 

and it is really old and im looking for a new 3D game programming that is more easier then this one.

 

Im going to try out Java 3D and 2D programming but its kind of new to me and if you recommand reading a book first or watch a video il try my best to go through it :)

 

eks:

local function abc()
local x = 5

local my_f = function()
x = 7.3
end

my_f() -- executes my_f

print(x) -- prints '7.3'
end

abc() -- executes abc

print(x) -- print 'nil'

 

 

Okey, what does "local" mean?

what do "local" do? and what is hes job?

what does "function" mean?

what do "function" do? what is hes job?

The same goes with all they other like: elsif, if , do, return, function, local, etc....

 

I dont expect to learn lua in 1-4 hours but yeah i tried thinking and find out how it works,.

 

print is = Shows up on the screen or console.

 

 

Questions.

 

1. is their a easy programming language then Lua that can make 2D or 3D games? like Java?

2. is their a programming language that is almost the same as Lua just more easier and better explained?

3. do you have any recommanded programmins books for free or not??

4. How do i run my Scripted files? my command/cmd cannot open them or read it!

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That's a bit like asking:  I want to buy a Beer, is there an easier language to buy a beer in other than french? Probably not. 

 

3D games programming *is* hard. It involves a lot of mathematics, and some fairly gnarly programming concepts (that can be difficult to grasp at first). The choice of language you use to learn 3D games programming, will therefore make very little difference - Those 3D concepts are going to be the same, whichever language you choose. Really, spend some time trying to understand programming games in 2D (using whichever language you like the look of most). Once you've understood the principles of programming languages (repetition, selection, data structures, functions, objects), and you've understood the principles of 2D games (vectors, matrices, spatial subdivision, state machines, etc), then, and only then, start looking at the 3D concepts..... 

I agree, but i have going through alot of other programming language. i just want to know what a newbie programmer should begin with insted of Lua, in my opinion is that Lua is a high level then i am on. so what should i switch to?

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I agree, but i have going through alot of other programming language. i just want to know what a newbie programmer should begin with insted of Lua, in my opinion is that Lua is a high level then i am on. so what should i switch to?

 

"High level", when talking about a programming language refers to a level of abstraction. If you mean that Lua is too hard for you, well, programming is hard.

 

Python often gets thrown around as a reasonable language to start with. But if you have a lot of experience in building web pages, perhaps starting with a web-related programming language (e.g. JavaScript on the client side, or PHP on the server side) could be a good path for you.

 

In any case, find a couple of simple introductory tutorials and then a book. Practice everything you learn: You don't need to finish learning a language to start using it (if that were the case, nobody would ever use C++ ;) ).

 

The reason why HTML is easy for me to understand is because a friend on mine teached it to me. i also went o a website that aslo learn you HTML and webdesign. The reason why i wanted to learn HTML coding was to make a custom loadingscreen for my Game Servers and forums. The reason why i want to learn game programming is because i enjoy playing games, i have alot of ideas, i want to understand coding, i want to develop a game, and i enjoy coding. I enjoy coding for making games but not making a webpage.

 

They way for me to learn coding is either some one teaches me or it is good explained and has examples. HTML is also translated to Norwegian the langauge i talk which also made it much easier. i havent seen any Norwegian game programming books.

 

Anyway thanks for replying smile.png

Edited by supersilentninja
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Greetings.

 

The reason you can't learn programming is because you start with the wrong books.

 

You don't need a book "how to programm in 3D" or "how to programm games" - those books are for those who are already programmers.

 

You need "Very Basic Programming for Non-Programmers" - the book that will teach you the very basic concepts of programming, common to all languages. I assure you, there are such books translated into Norwegian, you just look for them in the wrong place.

 

LUA, in my opinion, is the easiest language of them all. I've started learning LUA today and I can programm in it already - but it's because I'm an experienced programmer (in other languages), there is really not much I need to learn at all. For you, you need to learn the very basics. Once you've learned programming as a skill, you'll discover that learning different languages of programming is really trivial and easy.

 

I advice you to start with this tutorial: from very-very start of it. http://lua.gts-stolberg.de/en/index.php

 

It explains what is "local" - it is, by the way, a declaration of the scope of the variable. But what is a scope? You don't know it; it's a programming concept. This tutorial explains it. 

 

It's also explains what is "function" - this word is a mark, a sign, a declaration that the block of code between "function" and "end" is a separate block, it has a name, and can be used in other places through using that name. This is also explained in the tutorial.

 

Both "local" and "function" exist in ALL programming languages, so they aren't explained specifically. That's why you need some book "very basics of programming for very beginners - non-programmers", not any of more specific books.

 

Good luck; you have to learn to find proper books first, before programming; I assure you, there are such Norwegian books. smile.png

 Thank you :) im still really early to actully learn about coding. i need to finish this school which i have 3 years left. after im done at that school i need to move to Oslo and go Game programming for 3 years there. but i'm going to learn the most of it before i actully start on the school :)

This is what i will learn at that school:

 

Programming with Java
Databases
Digital technology
Web Project
information
Elective
Programming in C #, C and C + +
Software Architecture
Artificial intelligence
Algorithms and Data Structures
Mathematics and Physics
Software engineering
Project
Programming of game engines
3D Graphics Programming
Linear algebra
Entrepreneurship
Survey Methods
Elective
Research Project
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Looks like an alright pick of subjects (assuming the courses are sensibly implemented by qualified teachers).

 

Like people said, Lua is not harder than any other imperative programming language. What you need to get used to is the imperative thinking, HTML not only is a declarative way of thinking, but does not involve mathematics and logic in the same way, and that's why you will find Lua/Java/C++/whatever difficult even though you know HTML. When you pass the threshold and learn Lua or Java, learning your the second, third, fourth etc. imperative language will be much easier.

 

I learned HTML when I was 11, Visual Basic when 13, C/C++ when 16, Lua when 17, Java when 19... Now at 27 I know three dozen different languages, no exaggeration. smile.png Learn about 1-2 new ones every year.

Edited by Petter Hansson
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You will find learning programming to be a bit easier if you find tutorials which are written in the language you speak every day. I am assuming English is a second language to you.

Your struggles with Lua I have seen many times before, on the forum of a game where Lua is used for modding. You will find copying and pasting code is a slow, dangerous way to learn, as it will not always bestow good habits on you. The course your school is offering should help you get into programming, it's a way of thinking as much as anything else. ( I find myself solving real-life problems like I would do in code quite often. )

IMPORTANT NOTE: Do not get frustrated with doing small things, programming a game is NOT an easy thing to do and it may be many, many years before you are ready.

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I'm gonna throw in and just say that I think Python is amazing. I went from using a little perl (for scripting purposes) to heavily relying on Python, and did it all while learning about game-related concepts. I'd recommend the free book at http://inventwithpython.com/ .It's aimed at young audiences, so it explains every bit of code, and constantly works at the concept of core game mechanics.

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Hello everyone! I'm late to the bandwagon, just joined gamedev today and have been programming for almost a year now and starting to dabble in game development. I agree with @lucentbeam about python. It was the first language I learned and I absolutely love it, it's a great language to start with because of it's very readable syntax. If you would like a book on beginning to program I would recommend you get Hello World! by Warren D. Sande and Carter Sande: http://www.manning.com/sande/. It's written for children and adults alike and so all the code is explained and their is no complex English to impede understanding. I'm not sure if there is a version in Norwegian though. Hope this helped :)

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My first programming language was Visual Basic 5.  This is so old it is not of any real use today.  From this point I moved to many other languages until I actually found one I truly enjoy and I still dabble with newer languages from time to time.  I can say I am comfortable with programming in Java, Python, and C.  With a bit of a refresher and some work I could get back into using C#, C++, Lua, Ruby, Lisp, PHP, and Perl.  Personally my two favorite languages are C and Python.  If I was to start all over programming today from scratch knowing nothing I would probably go for Python.  The language is very clean and stays out of your way allowing you to learn important concepts.  Then from there I would move to C not C++.  For the same reason the languages is very clean and simple and allows you to learn more important concepts.

 

Lua is good but has the issue that it lacks a very robust standard library as Lua was designed as a extension type scripting language to be bolted on top of C.  I notice there are lots of libraries coming around for stand alone Lua development but there really is no standard library per se that I know of.  Python has a good standard library which makes life easier for learning.

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I have been programming since I was 13 (and that was a very long time ago :-)  I have used more than a dozen languages/environments for real work, and have taught JavaScript (and HTML, but HTML is not programming), C++, Java, Visual Basic to many classes, and also to many friends (some of whom are employed with what they learned).

 

I would encourage you to drop the idea of games programming, and learn Java. Being interested in games means you will gravitate towards graphical and/or interactive aspects of the language and libraries, rather than, say, networking or data structures, but you will eventually learn it all.

 

The advantages of Java are:

* Somewhat simpler than C++

* Far more popular than any Basic or scripting language

* Structured, so moving to most other popular languages will be [relatively] easy

* Plenty capable for writing awesome games

 

My favorite language is C++, but I do much of my work in Java simply becuase development is faster and my programs easily run on other platforms.  There are a few who will tell you that you can't build professional games in Java, but I promise you can. Java programs do run a little slower than, for e.g., C++, but the different is small and the performance bottlenecks in modern games have nothing to do with this difference (they are usually memory or GPU differences).

 

Find books and tutorials on Java, and go to town. At some point you'll feel confident and get a great game idea, and then it's all up hill from there.

 

If you should decide to move to C++ at some point, I recommend you experiment with Assembly first.  Few people use Assembly anymore (mostly just device-driver developers), but it will give you the rock-solid hardware foundation that will make you a top-notch C++ developer.

 

Good luck!

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Hi,

 

 

This is totally a matter of preference and opinion.

 

 

Generally C#, Java, and Python are considered both straight forward to learn and effective at gameplay scripting.

 

Avoid C++ for a couple years, in my opinion.

 

Find a game engine and get to work.  You won't know which is easiest for [I]you[/I] until you learn several at intermediate level or better.

 

Since you want really easy, avoid browser games for a while.  The debugging is [u]not[/u] easy for a beginner.

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For any programming language, you need to learn how to do these things in the language to use it:

 

-Create a Variable (with various data types)

-Create a Function

-Create and use arguments/parameters with functions

-Make conditional statements

-Use comparison operators

-Create For and While loops

-Write comments

 

(For Object Oriented Programming)

-Make Classes

-Make Objects

-Use Classes

-Use Objects

 

Each language has its own Syntax or Grammar Rules and that is what you have to learn. Writing a program is like writing a recipe where the variables are the ingredients and the various lines of code (statements) are the instructions. 

 

I use Lua personally in the Maratis3D engine, so if you need help, I can help. 

Edited by Tutorial Doctor
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