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Hello,

Me, as most of new guys there have the same question, how to begin? I started to study C++ not a long time ago, I dont have a lot of knowledge about this programming language, but I my goal is to know this language as good as possible. All I know about creating game(not just games, any graphical material) that i need SDL or Allegro, as I heard it's best thing for beginner. Thats all I know by the moment. Nothing more.

 

My question, How did you started, and what would you recommend for new face?

Thanks for any help.

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Here is an example list of books you should read in the order listed.  This is just one example of a pathway of knowledge.  That said, practice coding as much as you can.  Code lots of fun projects.  Always write the best code you possibly can, no matter how insignificant the piece is you are working on.  Doing that is how you see areas that may be improved.

 

google will be your best friend.

 

Intro

Beginning c++ through game programming 4th Ed

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1435457420/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=1435457420&linkCode=as2&tag=gamer2creator-20

 

How to write High Quality code

Code Complete 2nd Ed

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0735619670/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0735619670&linkCode=as2&tag=gamer2creator-20

 

Applied Game Development

SFML2 Game Development

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1849696845/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=1849696845&linkCode=as2&tag=gamer2creator-20

Edited by EddieV223

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We are working on a new cloud-based technology called "blueprint game generator" which will dynamically pull game resources from our repository and generate HTML5 games.

When that day comes,  even a blind-folded monkey pounding on a tablet would generate interesting games.  This is possible because our object-oriented framework allows users to publish and share game assets, codes (game rules and AI), and blueprints (which are xml files that direct and guide all these objects to work together to form games.)   All that monkey need do is to push a big red button to start the code generator which will build the final product based on the 'blueprints'.

Edited by mfdesigner

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I was going through the book 'C programing through game development' and noticed that the mathematical part (calculations etc.) was handled and the processes were explained nicely by the author. However, what i wanted to know was: what language makes up the gaming screen? I mean, C++ calculates the score - fine, but how do we display it in the right hand corner (or wherever we want) of the gaming screen? According to the C++ algorithm, suppose the user loses, how do we display the message to the user on the gaming screen? 

More precisely: How do we integrate the programming language that handles the graphics with the .cpp algorithm files ?

Edited by Bubu Bhat

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More precisely: How do we integrate the programming language that handles the graphics with the .cpp algorithm files ?

The answer is the previous post:

Concentration of all The Lessons in Common Library GLSummary in MFC

The source files are demo  and codes of ready working projects integrated the lessons from http://nehe.gamedev.net/  also integrated the programming language that handles the graphics with the .cpp algorithm files 

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We are working on a new cloud-based technology called "blueprint game generator"

[...]

 

 

Not even slightly relevant... please don't spam our forums!

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I am a huge fan of Gosu. I use the Ruby version, but there is a C++ version of Gosu as well. It is basically a library which gives you a bunch of built-in functions to work with (collision detection, velocity, etc.) so you don't have to "recreate the wheel" so to speak. There are a lot of working games and examples which you can try out and -- most importantly -- you can look at the code to see how they work (easier way to learn than reading a book in my opinion). Here is a link to the Gosu C++ rdocs, which gives an overview of the different built-in functions.

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