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teckpow

Browser games magic

13 posts in this topic

Hi everyone! I am a web developer and I am quite interested in browser games. I would like to ask you where can I begin? I mean what is necessary to build one? I'm not asking for a guide on how to, but for kind of examples like what should I use and why. I saw some people basing their game entirely on Adobe Flash, others using only HTML5 magic with JS, so my question is which "tools" may I use to develop a browser game? Thanks in advance!
-teckpow

 

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All depends on what kind of game you want. If it is mostly text based and just a few images to display, you could just use X/HTML and some server side language like PHP. What kind of game are you wanting to make?

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Hi,

 

Now is a good time to get into Canvas/HTML 5 and anticipate using JavaScript with Canvas as the technology advances in the future.  Its a great time for Canvas, as a matter of course.

 

If you only want to target regular computer browsers and not smart phones, then Flash might be a better technology for performance reasons, allowing you to create and play some games that are demanding on resources.  Look at the Flash games on Facebook and you will see what I mean.

 

For truly hardware cross-platform then I would recommend HTML5 and JavaScript.

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The answer totally depends on the type of game you want to make.

 

For some types of games Unity is by far the best choice.  I put together a complete mmo tech demo in unity for a project I was working on inside of a month.

 

Javascript and html5 are limited, again it depends on the type of game you want to make.  Javascript is a horrible language, that's something you will have to reconcile with and just deal with. For a good laugh when you have 5 minutes see this: https://www.destroyallsoftware.com/talks/wat.

 

I've been watching html5 for years.  Flash became popular primarily because of how bad javascript was, and how slow the html5 standards were progressing.  Nothing has really changed.  All that has happened is that people have managed to squeeze more out of a stagnant platform.   Html5 will never become what people want it to be.  It simply can't when it's hamstrung by a bad language and a standards body that's paralyzed by politics.  Platforms like Unity or chrome's native code abilities are examples of where I think the future of games on the browser are headed.

 

Flash is kind of a dying breed.  It's good for specific games but I would be really nervous about using it on any new large projects.

 

Chris

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Perhaps you can try our cloud-based HTML5 game engine. It uses only web technologies and run in the browser.

It follows a top-down object-oriented design.  Basically, it means you can visually (drag and drop) to wrap any

lower level codes and media assets into reusable and shareable components.  Once published to our store, 

others can build apps from your components.

 

It took me only a few minutes to create these scenes:

 

Pandora's Box   

Vandalize David 

 

We are currently working on a new technology called the "blueprint game generator".  Blueprint is an XML file that directs and guides 

users' components to work together to form a game.  Any user can create and share blueprints using Blueprint Composer.  Our code generator will be able to create the

finished products from user-submitted blueprints (e.g. by dynamically pulling required game resources from our repository.)

Edited by mfdesigner
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A big problem with HTML5 games is monetization. Flash games are somewhat sealed, while HTML5 games are very transparent. HTML5 is also not a finished standard and support by different browsers differs a lot. Tablets and phones have weak hardware support for the canvas(or so I've heard) which is kind of weakening the "cross-platforminess" of the technology. 

 

A big problem with the canvas is that you cant render svg or other forms of vector data directly on it. You will need a framework that can convert your produce for it. A full game production suit like Unity or Game Maker can help here. 

 

If you are serious about making games for browsers you would probably have to produce a ton of them and licence them, or you could build a backend-heavy thing which relies on player accounts and in-game purchases. 

 

Personally I like working with the canvas and web technology because I don't know anything else. It's also easy and fun to share stuff with friends and you never have to ask people to download strange things.

 

If you are a beginner in games production but experienced in web-technology then try building a simple game with some balls and blocks with plain javascript, then add modules which you see fit. I'm looking into CreateJS which works well with the requestAnimationFrame feature. KineticJS works with getTimeout wich is not as good.  

Edited by mippy
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teckpow,

 

 

We haven't even touched upon using Java with web/browser game development. Some developers have used Java to mostly displace JavaScript though the two are implemented differently.

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Thank you all for your advices guys! I really appreciate it!! :)
 

 

 

PS: Excuse me sir, but where did that come from? I don't remember saying anything about Java

teckpow,

 

 

We haven't even touched upon using Java with web/browser game development. Some developers have used Java to mostly displace JavaScript though the two are implemented differently.

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PS: Excuse me sir, but where did that come from? I don't remember saying anything about Java

 

 

Okay, I know your type.  Excuse me.

Edited by 3Ddreamer
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so my question is which "tools" may I use to develop a browser game? Thanks in advance!
-teckpow

 

Teckpow, you originally seemed open to a lot of ideas on how to make a browser game.

 

 

 

Thank you all for your advices guys! I really appreciate it!! smile.png

 

 

PS: Excuse me sir, but where did that come from? I don't remember saying anything about Java

teckpow,

 

 

We haven't even touched upon using Java with web/browser game development. Some developers have used Java to mostly displace JavaScript though the two are implemented differently.

 

 

 

Since you asked about tools for making a browser game, I was trying to let you know that HTML and JavaScript are not the only options. 

 

For an application creation standpoint, it is possible to make games for browsers that run from the server side using Java, perhaps in conjunction with HTML and/or JavaScript.  Java IDE has support for such full integration.   About ten years ago this was more common than today, but the technology actually works very well and is still a consideration.

 

For that matter, we also didn't get into Flash technology.  rolleyes.gif

 

No offense taken, but I don't want to waste my time.  

Edited by 3Ddreamer
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