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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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lomateron

has anyone here released a game that got no attention and make you depressed potato

28 posts in this topic

 

I made an iOS/android/kindle game that I spent about 4 or 5 months on. I think I've gotten about 8 downloads. My problem is I'm a marketing doofus and really failed to get the word out. But yeah, definitely a depressed potato. 

I wouldn't call my game a diamond. More like a thing I want people to play and see. Also some money to pay for food would be cool.

if it is your first game, make it free to maximize exposure, if it is good enough to keep players interested you have a great place to market your future games.

 

 

I agree with Simon.

 

Personally, I prefer it when people have a donate page on their game site rather than ads popping up all the time. People with money will be generous if they like what you've made. So what if 1000 people play your game and only 1 persons gives you money for it. What if that one person gives you 10,000 dollars? Stranger things have happened.

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I made an iOS/android/kindle game that I spent about 4 or 5 months on. I think I've gotten about 8 downloads. My problem is I'm a marketing doofus and really failed to get the word out. But yeah, definitely a depressed potato. 

I wouldn't call my game a diamond. More like a thing I want people to play and see. Also some money to pay for food would be cool.

if it is your first game, make it free to maximize exposure, if it is good enough to keep players interested you have a great place to market your future games.

 

 

I agree with Simon.

 

Personally, I prefer it when people have a donate page on their game site rather than ads popping up all the time. People with money will be generous if they like what you've made. So what if 1000 people play your game and only 1 persons gives you money for it. What if that one person gives you 10,000 dollars? Stranger things have happened.

 

Well, I won't be posting the link because this isn't my thread. But some of these responses give me hope for the game industry. Also I may have added some links to my sig because...y'know marketing issues.

Edited by csliva
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Ok lols rejected , now serious

 

For me it doesn't matter if you are a starter or not, don't do something that has been done lots of times before

 

Orymus3

Your game needs better artwork, and effects, it feels very old and simple. And I can't see anything new.

SUGGESTION: Add force, momentum, collision physics and make that space fleet more personal by being more physically controllable, add two mouse support: with one mouse you controll the missiles trajectory and with the other the space ship movements, so you will have to move to evade the missiles that are being controlled by the enemy following you and viceversa, then as you progress the speed of the missiles and the fleet increase. So it will be no more strategy...I don't like strategy games.

 

Shade

That game is a metroid with starfox fusion, it has story, animations, models, ai, explosions effects... those takes time to do and the game doen't show something revolutionary in any of those, I will not want to do something that takes time and isn't new.

SUGGESTION: Buy an oculus rift give the game the support, get high, play the game, add to game the visions that you get

 

 

DecadeDesign

Insufficient gameplay, can't say something

SUGGESTION: show some gameplay

Edited by lomateron
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Wait I have not released my game yet, I am just preparing myself mentally, still don't want to show nothing about it, and just wanted to know about other people that have spent same time as me and alone in a game

My last comment was just for the lols, take it lightly
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My last comment was just for the lols, take it lightly


Sorry I didn't saw the "sarcastic panel", I was wondering : "WTF OP, why so un-construcive!?" :)

But well, I didn't yet release (nor finish) my game, so I'm not yet depressed, but well, as Thomas Wayne said : "Why do we fall? It's to better get up." And as my aunt Susie also said : "Tu reprendras bien un peu de patates!" Which mean basicaly :  "Potatoes!"
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"Tu reprendras bien un peu de patates!"

Je n'aurais jamais pensé lire un jour quelque chose d'aussi insensé ;)

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Not everything that glitters is gold, my friend. I remember when I was twelve or thirteen, I got very much into freeware indie games. I played half of the library on this one site (I can't recall its name, but it had a green layout that was pretty cool) and some of them stuck with me all these (eight) years later. There was a game featuring a toggleable number of AI enemies, allies and teams, where you'd play as a vehicle and attempt to either destroy all of the enemy vehicles or capture a flag. The graphics weren't very complicated (top-down 2D, basic tiles), the gameplay was simple, but the open endedness, the physics, and the tight gunplay combined with its differentiated classes stuck with me.

The point I'm trying to make is that even if your game is not popular, even if it does only have eight downloads on iTunes, some young buck might play it and love it immensely, making him happy as a clam, and remembering it warmly for years. If that doesn't motivate you to publish your game then go get a business degree, you heartless bastard. tongue.png

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has anyone here spent more than 2 years developing a game alone?

Who didn't... :)

 

My current policy is, if I spend that much time developing one game it means I will not finish it anyway (and even if I did it would sux), so I cancel such game.

For some reason, all my successful games were made in span of months (or less), never years.

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I had the idea for Goofy Cubes for more than two years, but the development was off and on, because of client work mostly.    I rededicated myself to it in the spring and released it a month ago.  

 

Now, after a few bug/maintenance releases, I'm just starting to market it.    It's a lot of leg work, but I still believe in it.   If six months from now it's floating belly up, so be it.   Time to move on to the next game (or make GC more fun).

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I've been doing game development as a hobbyist for decades and have never published a game, though I've loads of partially complete projects on old drives which have only been seen only in private circles. I suppose I helped with one released project, which sort-of counts.

 

But I'm not sad at all about it. A few years ago I produced a software tool with the intention of making money. Got a few clients and the project turned into hard work and quickly ceased to be fun at all. I eventually stopped supporting it to win my freedom back.

 

As a hobbyist I can afford to spend 6 months coming up with a unique procedural planet algorithm, but if I'm producing a product to sell to the masses it's all about producing content quickly and keeping costs down. I create my games as a hobby so it can be less like work and more like art.

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I worked a lot too to make games, but so far, I failed miserably.

 

Here is a demo of my latest one:

http://creatures-of-gaia.com/demo

 

...but I really have some self confidence troubles. After all, it's not the first game I made and so far I only lost money with them.

I actually even quitted my job to try to make a living with games, but so far it has been 8 month without income and a career break.

It'll be the last game I make, I'm already planning to stop and look for a normal job, starting from scratch, not in games anymore. I have to pay my bills!

 

It hasn't really been a wonderful experience, more the opposite. There is simply no room for "average" games. If you don't reach top ratings, nobody will even look at it after a few days. Like somebody previously pointed out, with hundreds of new games per day on the apple store, your game has to be great and to be lucky enough to get noticed. It's much more likely that what you spent a year working hard on will be forgotten forever in ocean of "average" games nobody cares about. That's the hard reality of making games.  It's an extremely competitive and ungrateful business. Or at least, that's how I experience it. Somehow, people seem to only see the top-100 successful games, without noticing the huge ocean of unsuccessful games behind. I don't know of any field with such high competition and so many studios closing and emerging.

Hi,

 

I tested the game, and I think you did a good job.

I think it needs some more marketing so that people get to know it.

 

of course, there is a bit room of improvement, but thats only some details:

1) I missed to see how much gold coins I have so that I know when I can go to the dealer

2) there should be the upgrade Icon in the team split window box, when you can upgrade a team member

 

wish you good luck

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