• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Antonios

Which programmer is responsible?

18 posts in this topic

In various games who is responsible from the dev team for making the weapons fire, magic spells execute, bullets firing from guns etc?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are there any specific requirements for the job description of gameplay programmer? Any defacto knowledge that is considered to be standard?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Meh... usually designers are the ones tweaking values, not programmers. At least, that's how it works if you have reasonable tools instead of a crap workflow :-P


A smart gameplay programmer provides the "reasonable tools" that enable some game designer to assume responsibility for the tweaking work, letting the programmer work on programming tasks. Even if the designer is the programmer with a different hat, making changes easy and build-test cycles short is very useful.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was a stage, fortunately.

 

Edit: To elaborate, I'm now doing engine programming instead. I appreciate it because there are objective measures on how good my work is. If I reduce CPU usage on the MMO server I'm developing for a certain amount of players by 50% without making the code unreadable or introducing weird bugs it's an undeniable improvement and I will not be asked to revert it. When I was doing gameplay programming for a multiplayer online game it would frequently be like "this character needs shoes, please change the Unity prefab object and scripts to accomodate the new model and attachable objects". After being done a few hours later: "revert the change, it didn't look as good as we thought".

 

Doing gameplay programming strictly as a hobby again.

 

You were doing it wrong, that is not the job of a programmer thats a character artist and a scripters/designers job to make that change happen. If it needs a programmer your pipeline needs some refactoring.

This is way I like systems work you will still be in the trenches but you get to play arround with the hardware and new API's as well :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I mean, it should be like you say. Unfortunately the organization overall was inadequate. Not that I blame them, it was their first game, and managed by people without direct game experience. What could possibly go wrong with multi-national multi-continent cooperation between a tech company and an education company. ^^ I'm not angry, those were simply unfortunate circumstances that I accepted at the time of sign up. Because they/we didn't manage to hire a single competent designer all programmers were pulled into direct scripting, level development, and such in addition to engine development. Quite the experience.

 

Still, I strongly suspect the issue I described in the post you quoted is still more prevalent in the gameplay programmer profession than the engine programmer profession. Not only from my limited own experiences, but also from what I've heard from other programmers.

Edited by Petter Hansson
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I mean, it should be like you say. Unfortunately the organization overall was inadequate. Not that I blame them, it was their first game, and managed by people without direct game experience. What could possibly go wrong with multi-national multi-continent cooperation between a tech company and an education company. ^^ I'm not angry, those were simply unfortunate circumstances that I accepted at the time of sign up. Because they/we didn't manage to hire a single competent designer all programmers were pulled into direct scripting, level development, and such in addition to engine development. Quite the experience.

 

Still, I strongly suspect the issue I described in the post you quoted is still more prevalent in the gameplay programmer profession than the engine programmer profession. Not only from my limited own experiences, but also from what I've heard from other programmers.

It depends I have done all kinds of work when I was dedicated Front End programmer, for which the work at the time ranged from pipeline work, back end systems (atlas texturing, render to texture tech), to implementing functional sides of UI screens. However the only time a programmer was interfering with art work would be at the structural level, as in how a scene has to be put together, this was a drawback of the tech. And when a scene contained multiple child anims max only allows one anim line whilst our tech allowed for 4, also drawback in tech, that would end up in not to complicated xmls but complicated enough that everyone forgets who it works until you have to create one again.

 

We never really got involved with the look or real feel of it unless it would break a usability thing or a tech constraint.

 

Just wondering but what do you class as engine programming?

 

Writing the backend server software for that game, for instance (partially outside of Unity). Fixing and adding functions in some of the middleware we used, as well.

 

+1 for interesting reply

Edited by Petter Hansson
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Passion is what you need also, lots of it :)
And when you want to "get in" it's always helpful to have "home projects" and some finished games (even if there relatively easy), finishing an actual home/ hobby project is a plus for sure (knowing how many projects start with lots of drive and enthousiasm and in on some backup source code folder :))
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0