• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Moe091

I'm stuck, haven't gotten any better at programming in months

13 posts in this topic

First off:

 


Since quitting I have been much worse, possibly due to PAWS

 

You are not qualified to diagnose yourself with anything, and your proximity to the issue makes you an even less reliable judge of your own condition. Congratulations on managing to abstain on your own, it's something most people can't do at all. That alone says a lot about your willpower and ability to overcome your own issues. But see a doctor or rehab specialist as soon as is feasible. [b]NOTHING[/b] is as important as your sobriety. There is no reason not to utilize every tool and aid available to you right from the start.

 


Most normal people reading this probably won't quite know what I mean, and it's hard to explain. The best way I can explain it is that I consciously know what I want and need to do, and understand that it's going to take effort and I'll have to spend time doing things I don't want to do, I totally comprehend that and definitely think the reward is worth the effort I know I'll have to put in, but when it comes time to actually put in the effort I freeze. I struggle against myself in my own head and almost always lose. It wouldn't be inaccurate to say it feels as if there is another me in my head that I fight against for control of my actions, and the other me always forces me to submit.

 

I'll preface this by saying that I won't claim I know exactly what you're describing. If you can break a chemical addiction, you can handle this. But by defining the problem as one that you inherently lose, it's one that you'll never beat. I don't doubt that there are strategies you can deploy that will help you overcome this sort of thing, but I can't give much more specific advice because the only detail about the problem that I have is your assertion that it's unbeatable. Well, if you're right, then the problem is insurmountable and by definition you will never be able to deal with it. However, I think that you're wrong and that you can deal with it. Even so, you won't be able to do so until you can at least stop defining it as insurmountable.

 

With that out of the way, I'm sure that you don't need me to point out that this sounds exactly like the depressive stage of bipolar disorder. Exactly like it. It's unfortunate (though not uncommon) that you had a bad experience with the previous medication. But there is more than just that one out there, and a doctor can help you find one that has minimal (or at least manageable) side effects. If you choose to go without medication, then you'll have to try to ride out the depressive phase and hope that you can handle a manic phase, if and when one occurs. I'm a little confused when you say that you are "most likely bipolar", as a doctor gave you medication before strongly suggests that he or she formally diagnosed you, but no matter what the situation it sounds like this is something to bring to a doctor again.

 


And I don't have time to wait for it to be over to start doing anything.

 

From what you're describing, there's no passive piece to your current situation. Don't just wait and assume that stuff will get better on its own, especially with the specifics that you've mentioned.

 

 

Now, finally, I'll say that lack of motivation to do programming on your own as a hobby isn't at all unusual. I know that I get it from time to time, because there are far more relaxing ways to spend what little free time I have these days than engaging in a complicated and very cerebral activity. I know other people on this site go through similar phases as well. If that's all it is for you, then it's nothing much to worry about. Based on the stuff you described above, I wouldn't just assume that it's standard lack of motivation.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From what you said about your history, it sounds like you're accustomed to navigating according to your feelings, which will usually end up leading you to a place where you don't feel too great. The time you spent on your addiction was not simply away time in your development. It was actively reinforcing destructive behavior patterns, and the core of that is taking the 'quick fix'. I'm sure you've realized by now that's a way of cheating yourself out of a more fulfilling life, but you need to decide whether or not you're going to overthrow that underlying pattern and start moving forward from where you were when you started with the heroin. It's not a nice thought, but again I'm sure you've figured it out: the drugs are used to cover over other problems. This is the next problem you face. The solution is self-discipline, which isn't something that can be taught. You just have to roll up your sleeves and conquer both yourself and your environment in order to start building successes.

 

That doesn't mean just clenching your butthole and charging in head-first, either. That means using your head and managing your life responsibly. If you're not hooked up with a support network, get hooked up. If you don't have a medical professional helping with your recovery, get one. Make good decisions and you'll be much more likely to get good results. There's no quick cash-out for being responsible. There's the long term investment of living well, which pays in dividends.

 

Suggested reading: The Road Less Travelled

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

smile.png

 

 

 


I've been coding for probably about 2-3 years, inconsistently,

 

That is the source of your problem right there.  The solution, since you lack some motivation and direction, is to increase your desire to work hard almost every day on coding and stick with a course or other plan which has been ready made for people like you. 

 

Don't feel too bad, because this is very common for people to go thru a time in their life when their chosen occupation lacks their self-discipline. (Discipline really means training and not punishment.)

 

I recommend that you find a ready made plan somewhere to progress in coding.  That might be a book, a long online video tutorial, work with game dev team project using a certain game engine, school course - whatever makes you stay on course and pace yourself.

 

Let's keep things as simple and clear as possible.  You have the choice to get motivated and on a plan.  Just stick with it!

Edited by 3Ddreamer
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow. I feel like I just read a post about myself! I also loose interest really fast in the same way you do. If I don't see results as soon as possible I will scrap everything. 

 

I wonder, do you plan your projects to the end? If you plan first you will be able to scrap the project before you even start. hehe. 

 

I have a suggestion. I once tried to make a feature film using the Sims 2 game (In over my head), so I decided to make some Motivation Shots. First I worked on the intro to the film and made it really captivating. Then I worked one scene I thought would be really cool, and made it really good also. Then I got to a part that was just impossible for me to do without real people. And that is where I began to break down. And the project didn't get finished. 

 

Even when I have a lot of motivation, all it takes is a little demotivation to discourage me. I have these big ideas, but thing is, I don't have all the knowledge, or patience to learn the knowledge, to implement them. I overwhelm myself.

 

I wonder, do you have this same issue also?

 

What you should create for each project are MOTIVATORS. And it doesn't help to have friends who are not motivators (good ones that actually motivate you). You kinda have to set yourself up on purpose. For instance, if you have a smoking problem, get rid of your friends who smoke, destroy all of your cigarettes (if you keep even one, you loose already. Don't throw them in the trash where they can be retrieved.) Ride your car down to "E" so that the only place you have gas enough to go to is an important place, like work. hahaha.

 

This is sorta extreme, and chances are you will loose on the consistency part.

 

I wonder, do you have a consistency issue also?

 

After I cry and complain about my failed life, I just think, ''ARGHHH Whatever!" Then I go at it full steam!

 

Take care.    

Edited by Tutorial Doctor
2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, a lot of genuinely useful advice here, thanks a lot guys! I am not surprised that I got more helpful responses from GameDev than from all the addiction and mental health and self help forums I've ever posted on combined. I appreciate the well thought out responses that actually address my issues specifically, I was getting very tired of hearing the same cliche's over and over again from people who just read my post, get an idea of what it's about, and post whatever related unthoughtful/unoriginal cliche's and sayings that I've already heard hundreds of times. I had a feeling this would be a good place to get original and REAL advice even on such an unrelated topic :). Man I was getting tired of people trying to help me by telling me NA will solve all my problems, or that I need to 'work towards my goals'(Gee why didn't I think of doing that before!). Okay I'm done being bitter, it's just really refreshing to feel like I'm getting real advice from real people, thanks a lot guys that in itself is helpful :D.

 

 

I'm going to post back later with specific responses and more info but I really appreciate the help everyone, especially those who took the time to PM me I received some great advice there as well and am going to message you back later as well. I have a ton of phone calls to make and some procrastinating to do(I earned it I actually got a lot done today :p)

 

Thanks again everyone :)

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
May've been Bill Gates. In the interview, the guy indicated that he thought that people who didn't finish projects just weren't smart. That it takes a certain IQ level to have the motivation and drive to see things through to the end on your own. I have a relatively low IQ (especially compared to most engineers), so I took offense. To this day, whenever I'm about to sway on a project,  I remind myself that successful people will look at me and say it's because I'm stupid, and I go back at it with more fire than when I started.
 

I don't think this is necessarily true. Many dried out personal projects for me have been caused by that I have solved all technical challenges and only have more of the same to look forward to. That is, solving similar problems I've already solved, and in the case of game making that means endless tweaking and content production - something I just don't enjoy, as it seems. Ultimately though, the potential accuracy of this statement depends on whether this was this guy's personal opinion or whether he had some scientific backing up - I can only speculate.

 

However, I definitely agree on that it's crucial finding some way of motivating yourself and if that works for you, then you should keep thinking that. smile.png

Edited by Petter Hansson
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a link I find really... hmm... clarifying? I need to practice my english.

Anyway, here you go: http://makegames.tumblr.com/post/1136623767/finishing-a-game

 

I have studied game dev on my own for a long time now, and I had long plateaus where I did not advance on any direction whatsoever, until I found something specific to study and learn. It usually happened when I tried to do something that was way over my head or kept on doing what I already knew.

 

Today, I focus on finishing stuff, finishing my small projects, going from start to finish.

The simple fact that you go through the entire thing makes you learn a lot more than simply making two "half-games" or several prototypes; that's my experience.

 

 

So, design a game and try to program it. From here, there are only two possibilities:

1 - You'll be able to program it from ground up with no problem; or

2 - You'll face a problem, a new obstacle, something you did not know how to solve.

 

If you manage to finish it, good! Think of a bigger, more complex and maybe more ambitious project and do that again.

 

If you then get to that obstacle, you'll need to overcome it, create or find a good solution and finish your game.

If you think the problem is too difficult for you to solve right now, step back and archive your project temporarily. Create a simpler project and do the same. On the future, when you have thought of a solution, get back to this archived project and finish it!

 

Again, if you missed it, this is a link that everyone who, like me, has difficulties in finishing projects should read.

http://makegames.tumblr.com/post/1136623767/finishing-a-game

Edited by dejaime
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0