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      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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phantomus

Arauna2 path tracer announcement

8 posts in this topic

Hi all,

 

I posted a demo of the new Arauna2 renderer on ompf2.com:

http://ompf2.com/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=1887

 

A youtube of the demo can be found here:

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Znr1JJLI5uY[/youtube]

 

A higher quality version of the video can be downloaded as well (warning: large; 850Mb):

https://mega.co.nz/#!pgJQUJ4Z!XaJIW0B_BMha39FIk8TsOk2CV2RTw5wRPEpDbrVeNBk

 

And finally, the demo, which requires a decent CUDA device and 64-bit windows:

https://mega.co.nz/#!UphmTTxb!JAfhjCfDa3-zDo3Zy5gD9EArYxlkJKa10XPqZY8sZRs

 

Arauna2 is an interactive path tracer, which produces images using a random process. As a result, images contain noise, which will fade away as the pixel values approach the 'expected value'. Arauna2 has been optimized to produce decent quality images very quickly, and converges to high quality images in seconds. It is intended for architectural walkthroughs, but something involving games would be even more awesome. As you can see in the demo, we are not there yet, sadly.

 

I believe Arauna2 is currently the fastest path tracer, but that is of course strongly dependent on requirements. Main limitation is the fixed shading path, which supports the full Phong model, specular, dielectrics, textures, normal mapping and emissive surfaces, as well as every sensible combination of those. Illumination is provided using light emitting surfaces, meshes, point lights, spotlights (including IES profile support) and directional lights.

 

- Jacco.

 

last weaks i found myself interested in raytracing and about a week ago incidentally i got know about aruna realtime pathtracer (though i cannot run it on my terribly old machine)

I am fan of it - great work, (Besides i hope that home computers will be 2, 5, 10 times faster in succesive years  

though the 10x factor sadly I think can take many years  :CC

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Have you or will you plan to implement any type of noise filtering?

 

Filtering is being researched at the moment (not by me though); it is far from trivial in this context. Normally you would do something in screen space, but a path tracer typically doesn't have a single depth per pixel (which is needed to find geometry edges), so that is of limited use. The best solutions so far filter in 'path space' (considering the full set of paths arriving at the camera), but this is compute- and memory intensive.

 

I would expect filtering to bring a significant improvement to path tracing at some point in time, but right now, it is not yet sufficiently researched.

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Really nice demo. Wish I could try it out (AMD here). I'm curious, are you planning on porting the code to OpenCL anytime soon or is it too deeply integrated with the CUDA platform? Also, how do the lens effects work, for instance, at the beginning of the video? Are they path-traced as well, with the optical system part of the geometry, or are they a post-processing step?

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[...] It is intended for architectural walkthroughs, but something involving games would be even more awesome. As you can see in the demo, we are not there yet, sadly. [...]

 

I don't know... some of the greatest games ever were crafted by limitations. One could use the effect of the path tracer noise intentionally. For example - a guy remotely controlling some machine from hundreds of millions of miles away and the effect you see is because of that. Or a robot with an somewhat injured camera connection. The effect looks really cool if thought of that way...

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For those with fast GPUs, here's an executable that renders at full 1280x800 res, instead of the upsampled 640x400:

https://mega.co.nz/#!ZwBjWChQ!cgoSi1I-7gLKkBooUHFgmQWClwMocl-qqQ8YeiR2vx8

Note that this requires the original package for the data. Also note that this still uses only one GPU; multi-GPU rendering has been disabled in the demo.

Let me know how this runs on your machine. :)

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