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tecsperk

Recommendation for what game engine I should use?

13 posts in this topic

Hey all!

Stack exchange redirected me here to ask this, but anyway. 

I am currently in a concept stage of designing a 3D game, however I am having trouble deciding what game engine I should use.

Some requirements would be:

  • Designer-oriented
  • Similar to Source in visuals
  • Doesn't have to be very good when it comes to realism, i.e:

http://www.gamerzines.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/c1a0_release11_001.jpg , great

http://media.pcgamer.com/files/2012/04/Crysis-3-1.jpg , over the top

  • Life-like lighting

Also, the game engine does not have to be modified much when it comes to programming.

Anyway, what would be the game engine suited to the requirements I need?

Edited by tecsperk
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Unless you want a serious headache, forget UDK and Cryengine. Just go with Unity! 

Edited by Code_Grammer
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Big fan of Unity...

 

But I think more importantly, pick a handful and select which one is more intuitive to your own personal preferences.  Anything Unity can do, UDK and CryEngine can do (and vice versa).  I just happened to pick up Unity, and it just kinda "fit" me. 

 

Try them all, see what you seem to pick up the easiest.  Chances are if it fits you, you can find a way to make it work for whatever your needs are.

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I tried out the UDK and found it pretty good.

But others have warned that the UDK is not great for single-devs so I tried out Unity.

 

I seriously can't figure out the unity interface at all.

 

I've read tutorials and watched videos but I find it hard on how to actually use it as fast as using the UDK or Source SDK.

 

Also, I said that I don't want a life-like look, so no CryEngine.

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Also, FPS dev in Unity seems sort of... long to implment to my suitings.

 

But I try to develop some type of level in the UDK and Unity in a week time and post what I think for future people reading this (that have the same needs).

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Also, I said that I don't want a life-like look, so no CryEngine.

As I mentioned earlier, a large part of that will be about the art assets you use, and about the effects applied. You can make a non-realistic game with CryEngine just as easily as with any of the other options.

Given your listed requirements however, I would definitely not describe CryEngine as "designer friendly".
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Most engines are going to require you to put in time to learn them, personally having worked with CryEngine and UDK, I would count them out on the basis that they are very large and complex engines that are difficult to learn and very technical (not nice for designer oriented development). 

 

Unity is an excellent choice, once you understand the UI. Unity is very open ended in the games it can make, the only downside is things like FPS require more code to implement than in UDK, although the asset store will save your ass here as there are hundreds of scripts available. Unity also has an addon visual scripting system called Playmaker, which will help you achieve your designer oriented development.

 

Lastly I'd like to add another engine to the table if you really don't like Unity. Shiva3D. Its quite a nice engine, super cross platform. It uses Lua as a scripting language, which I can testify to being a wonderful and easy to learn language. Its not free for a commercial license, but it's still cheaper than Unity Pro.

 

Personally I would go with Unity, although I'd like to hear more thoughts.

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I wanna throw Torque3d MIT out there


Great option for a programmer, but I'd say in this case it's definitely going to fail the "designer friendly" requirement.
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