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tecsperk

What 3D modelling software (do you use)?

23 posts in this topic

Hi again!

 

Just wondering what 3D modelling tool(s) you use for game development.

 

I heard that Blender might be a good choice for baking lighting into levels.

 

Anyway, what software do you use for object design and/or level creation?

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At work, the artists use a mixture of Maya and Max (actually I don't know which is better for what task).
The rest of us coders use Blender, Wings3D or (my personal favorite) a slightly tweaked GtkRadiant to knock up quick test models or placeholders. Edited by Karsten_
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Another software I use regularly is Modo. Modo is commercial, although significantly cheaper than Max and Maya. I like it because it give me the power and support of commercial software without costing the same as a car.

 

I used Blender for years before I got Modo though, and if you are on a tight budget theres nothing much that competes with Blender. Fantastic toolset with a very lively and helpful community. Also updates are released every couple of months, making for a nice and refreshing release cycle.

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I just found something called "Misfit Model 3D":http://www.misfitcode.com/misfitmodel3d . Never used it, but it looks cool, and the features seem useful.

 

I don't do much modeling, but I'm always looking for simple tools like this... Anim8or is the last tool I modeled something in, and I found it quite easy to use.

 

I also created a simple BSP map in GtkRadiant once. Blender, Max, Maya and other such tools are way too advanced for my purpose and I always thought of them as bloatware.

 

Anyway, the question of what tools to use is irrelevant... You have to know what features you need.

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At work I use (the rarely mentioned) Cinema 4D. It's in a similar class as Max or Maya, but tends to be used more for motion graphics. The main advantage to it is it has an awesome learning curve and intuitive controls... But it can be expensive, but there may be a basic free version, I'll need to look that up.

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We use Softimage (also known as XSI) on my current project, but at all my previous jobs the main tool has either been Maya or Max.

 

Blender has gotten a lot better in recent years, so it's just as valid of a choice, plus it's free!

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Beside other programs cited here, i love Amapi 3D. I know, this program is old, and have a few minor ui bugs sometimes, but damn, it's the best tool i ever used for modeling.

Take a like while to get used to, but compared to studio max, it's just waaaaaaaay faster to do stuffs with it (i swear!). Basically, you can do everything from the various icons

in the editor, the mouse, and the spacebar, so you don't need to scroll to a menu each time you want to do something simple.

 

For example, want to align that sphere perfectly centered to another mesh, let say, a cube, easy! You just click the snap tool, click in the middle of the spere, then click in the middle of the square, done! Want to align only some vertice to another vertice, it's easy as pie.

 

But that's it, modeling is it's strong force, the rest (rendering, texturing, lighting ect) could be better imo, and i dont think it's been updated since 10 years or so...

Another downside is the .3ds export is kinda broken, but not the .dxf exporter, so it's best to export in .dxf and reimport in 3ds this way.

 

Still don't beleive me? Take a look a those, it's a complete model of my drum kit in 3d. I would NEVER been able to do this with 3ds max, not even close.

(Everything is modeled down to the bolts and nuts!! ...all i used was a simple ruler!)

 

pic1, pic2, pic3, pic4, pic5, pic6

Edited by Vortez
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Where do you get Amapi 3D from?

 

?I googled it but apparently the company that created it shut down / sold off.  

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Just wondering what 3D modelling tool(s) you use for game development.
In the past I've used Hammer (specific for ID Software-based tech). I then transitioned to Sketchup for some time, but it never cut it. The free version is insufficient in terms of exporting options.

I am using blender at the moment, I greatly recommend it.

As far as I've understood however it isn't better at baking than all other paid software. But for free, that's an accomplishment!

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Cheetah3D -- cheap, fast learning and quite good features - mesh editing, material composing, animation, IK, physics, rendering (raytrace, caustics, AO, radiosity,...), texture baking, scripting... Disadvantages are in scripting (no access to vertex weights) and few editing tools are strangely implemented. For now, it is everything I need.

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If you're just into modeling it's best just to grab Blender, duh.

 

Its feature set actually competes with the top commercial alternatives that cost many thousand dollars and it's free so you don't have to break any laws to get it. Nobody actually buys products like 3dsmax or Maya without serious plans about making a living out of modeling one day and BTW the competition is tough...

 

Blender doesn't cost you anything and I'd bet you won't be wanting to invest in any competing commercial software after seeing what it's capable of.

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I use:

Google Sketchup (technical modeling- buildings and such)
Blender 3D (light mapping/ baking light into meshes, uv unwrapping, texturing,animation)
Wings 3D (box modeling)
Sculptris (sculpting)
Quidam Studio (character generation and sculpting)
Meshlab (viewing models and making technical edits)

My engine is Maratis 3D
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I play with Blender, do textures with Gimp (I mainly like programming so I suck at the art though). Had to do a character and animate it in Blender for my game programming degree and it ran bow-legged (definitely not my strong suit).

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If you are a student you can get the Autodesk tools like 3ds Max or Maya for free at students.autodesk.com. Commercial use is not allowed but if you just want to learn using the tools this might be a good option for you.

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If you are a student you can get the Autodesk tools like 3ds Max or Maya for free at students.autodesk.com. Commercial use is not allowed but if you just want to learn using the tools this might be a good option for you.

Get 'em addicted young ;)

 

When I do 3D artwork, I use blender but the biggest issue with it is that it changes a little bit too quickly compared to commercial offerings.

 

Does anyone remember this (not too old) interface?

http://b.vimeocdn.com/ts/719/271/71927121_640.jpg

Was replaced with the current one.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/6d/Blender_Version_2.570.jpg

 

Potentially to be replaced again with
http://www.blendernation.com/2013/10/17/new-blender-ui-proposal/

 

Blender is open-source... but like many open-source projects (i.e Gnome 3) drags in far too many dependencies for a single person to maintain, so it is almost impossible to keep running the version of Blender / interface you like. Though the older interface was a little bit more ugly, it seemed less claustrophobic on smaller laptop screens.

Edited by Karsten_
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Blender. I'll use blender + priovr suit for mocap (when the priovr suit is released).

Don't have to wait for a suit. I'm thinking they had a couple of tutorial videos on the blender site that showed how to do mocap with multi-colored balls for weapons and motion and basic camera.

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Blender. I'll use blender + priovr suit for mocap (when the priovr suit is released).

Don't have to wait for a suit. I'm thinking they had a couple of tutorial videos on the blender site that showed how to do mocap with multi-colored balls for weapons and motion and basic camera.

Hmm. Anykind of balls. I'm guessing that'll be useful for face capturing.
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Game engines typically have a "default" workflow pipeline which includes a 3D Software, for example - Torque 3D has Blender, but you may use others by preference and do the converting of 3D model file formats.

 

From a game developer point of view, the file formats of the objects, levels, characters, and so forth, is a critical issue of the pipeline. 

 

For maximum efficiency and effectiveness you are forced to assemble a workflow pipeline of applications and software, so do not hodge podge and clump things together with a spaghetti game source code because that is a dead end for sure. Modular coding such as class files and threading optimizations are the ultimate objectives in order to maximize game performance. Making your workflow pipeline will greatly influence all of these issues and the resulting amount of labor spent in various areas, so choose carefully.  

 

Summary

1) Select a game engine.

2) Use the language or languages which are native to that game engine (for inexperienced game developers, that's one language).

3) Assemble a workflow pipeline within the game engine, preferably the default workflow pipeline of the game engine unless you have compelling reasons to vary by taking alternatives.

 

For a "one man band" indy developer, it might take months or even a year or two to try different things and settle on a pipeline. Progress as orderly as you can!

Edited by 3Ddreamer
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VOIDWORL_charack2.jpg

There is a free version of VoidWorld and it can be used for commercial purposes:
http://voidworld.cmcproductions.co.uk/index.php?topic=1320.0

It won't receive any more updates, however.

Another free modeller is K-3D:
http://www.k-3d.org/node/1

- - - - -
I would only recommend using any alternative free modeller package if you did not like Blender. Regarding the amount of features and userbase, I'm confident Blender leads the competition among the free modellers. Edited by Kryzon
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