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Eliad Moshe

Pricing a freelance project

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Hi Guys,

I received an offer from a startup company to develop a Dock (C++, win32 API) like this one -> http://app.etizer.org/ to be integrated eventually as a component in a bigger software.

It should take me something like two months to accomplish.

I am not sure how to properly tag it's price.

 

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2 Months is 8/9 weeks, or working full-time that's about 350 hours. If your estimate is reasonable, then just multiply that by a fair hourly rate. Take the kind of hourly rate you'd like to be getting for a full-time job, and add another 10% to 100% on top of it as bonus pay for casual work.

 

 

You could then break up the project into smaller sections, usually called milestones. Say that after two weeks you'll deliver them a version that has features A and B implemented, but missing C, D, E and F. Agree that at this point you'll receive two weeks worth of pay. Then set another milestone to deliver feature C at x-weeks for $y, etc... This gives you and them a bit of peace of mind; that you'll be paid while working, and they get to see progress in smaller increments and have a chance to give feedback/direction.

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I usually use a per-hour price and then evaluate based on that, but you won't be able to do that until you have a good idea how much work is involved. 

 

I think you should do a lot of research first and understand how you would implement it. Then, as Hodgman says, you can evaluate each smaller part as how many hours it would take to complete and then group those tasks into milestones. If your client accepts you can also make an "official", paid, research phase first that will allow you to dig more into what you'll actually do and that will allow you to give them a more precise estimate of the time and costs involved. 

 

I also add about 20-30% of time to my initial estimations, just in case things go wrong. Your client will be happier if you complete the work earlier than estimated rather than later.

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