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Simon Lovschal

Beginner in Programming for games help please

13 posts in this topic

So i really like to play games and i have been loving it for ages but now time has come for my self to actually start learning other Programming Language then MYSQL and PHP.

 

i am intrested in making 2D games, Text Based, Simple Games like pac man and so on or something close to that. 

 

And i need help to decide what language is best to write in and how to start so all help is welcoming.

 

i have some ideas

 

C#

C++

Java maybe?
but the problem is i dont know where to start 

 

Give your ideas on how to start and i will glady accept that help :D

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I highly recommend C#. Knowing C++ as well is very useful in the long run, it teaches you a lot about the lower down parts of the code so you can make more informed choices in other languages at the very least. But if you haven't done any game dev really it's good to pick up an easy to learn language like C#, XNA is a good library to get started with.

I really do not recommend Java, although I'm sure some out there will disagree with me, as a language it doesn't offer much over C# other than the fact you'd have to use Mono to target all platforms like Java does. In terms of game development it has some of the least support of any mainstream language, even Python with Pygame would probably be way better than Java quite frankly.

Anyway just pick something that looks interesting and get to work, you learn a lot more by experimenting than asking whats the best thing, imagine how many hours of code you could have written in the time you might sit there worrying about if you picked the right thing.
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now time has come for my self to actually start learning other Programming Language then MYSQL and PHP.

 

As you have already been given suggestions on approaching the language question, may I ask why you want to learn some programming language before MySQL and PHP? There is nothing wrong with starting with your goal.

 

Text based games could be a decent start while you learn, to give you a little motivation as you go along. Write pieces for your game as you learn.

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now time has come for my self to actually start learning other Programming Language then MYSQL and PHP.

 

As you have already been given suggestions on approaching the language question, may I ask why you want to learn some programming language before MySQL and PHP? There is nothing wrong with starting with your goal.

 

Text based games could be a decent start while you learn, to give you a little motivation as you go along. Write pieces for your game as you learn.

 

uh sorry it might have sounded wrong but i already know PHP and MYSQL on quite a nice level :D 

 

and i am instrested in making games and i have been so for quite some time and i learned by many that C# and C++ is a good choice to make but i dont know where to start

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As has already been said, what language you choose is mostly irrelevant, though you might want to think about what platforms you're targeting before you make a decision.

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"C++ was developed in the 1980s, based on the C language, but with a bottom-up approach. C++ uses object-oriented programming (OOP) concepts like classes, objects, and polymorphism. Data is considered more important than process. It also has useful OOP features like data hiding for security.

However, C++ is not a true OOP language, because it is quite dependent on the procedural fundamentals of C. Like C, it compiles into binary and is executed natively. Being powerful and fast, it is chosen for intensive gaming applications. However, running natively means a single error could cause a total computer crash and data loss.

C# is the latest toolset, based on C++ code. Developed by Microsoft towards the turn of the 21st century, it is a .Net language, and in some ways, similar to Java. This high-level language is first compiled to a middle language, and then into direct binary. Thus, you can consider this code to be interpreted in run time. C# is compatible with most operating systems, and programming is simplified thanks to built-in functions. Note that this may be a disadvantage if you are a serious programmer, because the abstractness takes away some degree of control from you.

C# is slower than C or C++ because it runs on a virtual machine rather than a native one. Programming errors may destroy the virtual machine, but your computer remains unharmed. The speed difference goes unnoticed on the super-fast computers you have today."

I started with C++ and HGE (Haaf's game engine) but I recommend C++ only if you enjoy pain as it is very hard to understand at the beginning but in the long run C++ is better than Java or C#, in my opinion.  

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Guys really? I mean, I'd make him consider HTML5/JS if I were you, and since he has MySQL/PHP experience I'd figure he has some webdev experience. C, C++, Java is all too complex for a starter IMHO.

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Guys really? I mean, I'd make him consider HTML5/JS if I were you, and since he has MySQL/PHP experience I'd figure he has some webdev experience. C, C++, Java is all too complex for a starter IMHO.

 

Well, we don't know if he wants to do web based games, which is why I was curious about what platforms he was targeting.  If he wants to write native code for a platform, then HTML/JS are going to be poor choices.

 

Secondly, Java is often used as a language for teaching beginners (and the OP isn't even a beginner programmer), so can hardly be considered too complex. Anybody who has experience with programming paradigms and techniques should be able to pick up the three languages you mentioned without a lot of difficulty.

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I'd try a good game engine, not because you need one, but because they tend to have AWESOME help for beginners to use their engines (Which will also teach you how to code!) We use Unity

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Hi,

 

 


C#

C++

Java maybe?
but the problem is i dont know where to start



Give your ideas on how to start and i will glady accept that help

 

 

Stay the  #%@*#!!  far from C++ until you reach intermediate level in another coding language! This will save you months, if not years, of confusion and unnecessary delay in getting your first few games finished.  The language of C++ is just fine but so extensive that you will get lost soon. It is too forgiving of bad coding habits to really be practical for a beginner.

 

The C# is a great choice, but Java has its place, too, especially if you like it and it is being used for scripting gameplay.

 

 

1)  Choose a game engine which suits your genre of game and your skills.

 

2)  Use the main language which is supported by that game engine.

 

3)  Make several applications and 2D console type games (like tic-tac-toe, crossword puzzle, word search, etc.) before even touching a game engine.

 

4) Assemble your workflow pipeline of software and applications connected to your game engine of choice.

 

5) Create a few 2D games using the game engine.

 

6) After 1-2 years practice, begin making 3D games.  (I say this because you will be tempted sooner than that!  wink.png )

 

Read my signature below here for solid general advice...

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