• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Ark3typ3

Microeconomics in video games?

10 posts in this topic

I was reading an article on 17 rules for a sustainable economy http://ukiahcommunityblog.wordpress.com/contact/wendell-berrys-17-rules-for-a-sustainable-economy/ and it got me thinking about how granular people expect a game to get in terms of its economy and crafting systems. 

 

I would like to develop a game that focuses on the idea of Mendo Island with a potential multiplayer component (dunno, we'll see).

 

What do you feel the strengths and weaknesses of games that focus purely on microeconomics are? I would like to focus on medieval level agriculture with distribution and tool creation and work my way up from there around a fully survival based game (you don't eat, you die). 

 

Has anyone seen a healthy balance between "second job" tedium and fulfilling achievement?

Edited by Ark3typ3
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Most probably there could be the inclusion of micro economics in gaming. At first, it used to sound a bit weird to me, but I have seen many games implementing such strategies. However, I am still not clear on how it works, but would certainly give a marginal boost to the gaming community as a whole.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't agree with all of those rules, but that aside, it sounds like a natural candidate for a SimCity type game.  As far as weaknesses of games focusing on economics, usually the problem is that economics in reality are intertwined with culture, reproduction, medicine, religion... all things that games are rarely good at handling with depth, verisimilitude, or understanding of human nature.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

RuneScape implemented a tight run Grand Exchange with microeconomics and also a stock market. Check it out if you'd like. It limited maximum trade for items based on trends of the RuneScape trading prices overall. Essentially what it did was annoy most of the players because they had set a limit on trades because they wanted to tread through uncharted territory. Free economy, respectively, is a better choice, unless of course the game is based completely on some type of trading system or economy. It would have to be a special type of game to include microeconomics, in my personal opinion.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Persistent worlds are an interesting study in game economies. I've been particularly interested in Entropia and how having an exchange rate with real-currency has affected the design of the game. In the case of Entropia, there are many more drains than usual to the game's economy and the game feels much more like a casino.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Persistent worlds are an interesting study in game economies. I've been particularly interested in Entropia and how having an exchange rate with real-currency has affected the design of the game. In the case of Entropia, there are many more drains than usual to the game's economy and the game feels much more like a casino.

 

I experimented with Entropia for a while. The game is basically a giant slot machine: for every $1 you put in, you're most likely getting 95 cents back in the long run. Like in real life, they let a few people (not sure if they are planted by the company) win big from time to time to keep people motivated in pulling the lever.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Persistent worlds are an interesting study in game economies. I've been particularly interested in Entropia and how having an exchange rate with real-currency has affected the design of the game. In the case of Entropia, there are many more drains than usual to the game's economy and the game feels much more like a casino.

 

I experimented with Entropia for a while. The game is basically a giant slot machine: for every $1 you put in, you're most likely getting 95 cents back in the long run. Like in real life, they let a few people (not sure if they are planted by the company) win big from time to time to keep people motivated in pulling the lever.

 

 

They're probably not plants. Like any casino, the house always wins...even when someone hits the jackpot.

 

its-easy-to-win-at-roulette.gif

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Persistent worlds are an interesting study in game economies. I've been particularly interested in Entropia and how having an exchange rate with real-currency has affected the design of the game. In the case of Entropia, there are many more drains than usual to the game's economy and the game feels much more like a casino.

 

I agree, it did interesting things with EVE Online when people were suddenly able to play the game to pay for the game. My focus was making the pieces of an economy ready for players to pick up and sandbox their brains out with whatever they wanted to do. However, it's quite monumental to develop the game with enough content to not restrict the market. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Making sure natural resources industries are supplanted by other small value-adding businesses so that your economy doesn't become a pawn of other economies, sounds like macro.

I hope you will consider using my economics engine I might develop. Haven't gotten around to it because its got no concrete use cases. Are you interesting in simulating the workers individually, preoccupied with their daily activities? Farming seasons would have to be speeded up for the player to enjoy the game.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are no micro-economics in games, there are levels of detail.

More levels of detail are a way of keeping the attention of some players.

Take for example starcraft, new players can easily learn a simple strategy to win against the AI,

experienced players play matches where they manage to accumulate up to 200 mouse-clicks in a minute,
that's three individual selections/orders/interfacerepositions every second.

 

A game like simcity starts small, simple as well, but, when the player has managed to make a decent community,

it grows and the player gets more funds and has the option to expand.

(notice that the initial smaller community the player has is basically a "micro-economics"-version of the bigger community,

also notice the player doesn't need to keep on growing if he doesn't want to)

 

Basically, if you're going to focus on micro economics i fear you 'll just create a game in which very little happens,

and when something happens it will be something the player doesn't understand why it happens.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that something can be done about the levels of details : a system of orders and plans : imagine you start with a factory or a farm, at first you have to make it works, to build a system to give food to the animal or ressources to the production chain, then when the level of detail decrease -that is to say when you are able to build many factories or farms- , you can reuse the plans you made for your first factories (or make new plans).

 

If you have a town to rule maybe a system of order can be used : if such event happens do this then that

 

 

That would give to the player the satisfaction to rule every details without being bored by repetitive tasks

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0