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WopsS

CryEngine VS UDK! Which is the best?

11 posts in this topic

Hello, I decided to start doing a little game and do not know what engine to use ... Of CryEngine and UDK that say it better? But PhyX Nvidia is an engine is better than two?

PS: I searched the internet but still do not know which one to use ...

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I decided to start doing a little game
'

 

 

I'm not nearly as experienced or knowledgeable as the gentleman above me, but I'm sure he would agree: if you just barely decided to do "a little game," then neither one are probably going to help you as they're both loaded to the maximum with features and abilities that most people who are just starting game developing and wanting to do a small project would find over-powered and unnecessary.  Not to mention it's not considered really user-friendly from what I've seen/read in comments (unless you've got a fair bit of experience in game development.)

 

 

With that said, I also take the stance "which game engine is best" == "which programming language is best"...

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only one of them leaked my personal information.

 

I'd like to know a bit more about this...  I honestly had considered trying them, and hadn't heard anything like that before.  (Obviously, I never thought I'd have to see if that was an issue, though...)

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Well bar the other topic on hand, I'd say UDK for simple smaller games. Even the basics like importing is far simpler, there's a lot of support for UDK to get you going and I'm a developer using CryEngine. For top of the range realism with some mighty cool realtime features CryEngine is very hard to beat.

 

Also I'd very much disagree with which X should you use when it comes to answer #2 in terms of game engines, it's a case of choose the applicable poison. I started out in a certain game engine and when go to the more advanced nitty gritty the engine would of needed a small overhaul to get it to do exactly what I needed, time being a common enemy of games developers it was never going to happen.

Edited by ShadowKGames
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I'd very much disagree with which X should you use when it comes to answer #2 in terms of game engines, it's a case of choose the applicable poison

 

Which makes it identical to choosing a language--choose the one that most applies.  If you want cross-platform, C# is less applicable than C\C++.  Want a simple, single player web-game?  JavaScript is probably more applicable than Ruby.  If you want a mobile game, Objective-C is probably more applicable than Python.

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CryEngine is more powerfull than UDK, especially the lighting-features. In UDK you have to bake lights (which can take ages), in CryEngine it works  instantaneously.

What i don't like about CryEngine is the mandatory login (online connection) which prevents you from working offline with it.

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CryEngine is more powerfull than UDK, especially the lighting-features. In UDK you have to bake lights (which can take ages), in CryEngine it works  instantaneously.

What i don't like about CryEngine is the mandatory login (online connection) which prevents you from working offline with it.

 

Mandatory login has been removed in the latest rendition, that being said unless you have at least a medium sized team and a large amount of collateral I wouldn't try and attempt to make a full project in it. Even though I must say, CryEngine is a technical marvel and looks very nice.. 

 

 

 


I'd very much disagree with which X should you use when it comes to answer #2 in terms of game engines, it's a case of choose the applicable poison

 

Which makes it identical to choosing a language--choose the one that most applies.  If you want cross-platform, C# is less applicable than C\C++.  Want a simple, single player web-game?  JavaScript is probably more applicable than Ruby.  If you want a mobile game, Objective-C is probably more applicable than Python.

 

 

I very much agree, C# with the likes of Unity and Crymono make life much easier. I can forsee C# becoming very popular with the game industry in years to come. That said Unreal 4 has adopted C++.

Edited by ShadowKGames
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Hello, I decided to start doing a little game and do not know what engine to use.

Hello,

 

The important thing I noticed on your post is the word little. But both libraries you listed are quite big and somewhat intended for big projects. And, by PhyX, I imagine you meant PhysX? If that's the case, that's a physics engine, that surely isn't for simpler games.

 

Reason tells me to say "It doesn't matter which you choose", but just try to start slow...

 

If you have no experience, or just some, you could surely get a tutorial series online and start from there.

Edited by dejaime
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Don't use an engine. Start from scratch and make everything by yourself until you hit the point when you realise that it is too much of the work when you do everything by yourself. At this point you may start to look at different engines, try them, read about them and choose the most suitable for your needs.

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