Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
Robin Hood

I Have good ideas (whole games) and some questions.

This topic is 2144 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

I have good ideas and want to get into the industry.

My problem is i have no computer skills, so i was wondering if i should just do them on paper first with lots of illustrations in order to maybe protect them (copyright etc) and once that is done try to sell it.

 

Also, i have loads of ideas in general,movies, bits for games and internet sites.

Does anybody know of a place which has use for someone who could come up with ideas on a weekly basis??

As for the quality of the ideas, i, like most i am sure, am 100% convinced that they are good.

I have played games for 27 years now and have been watching movies for just as long, so i know what is good (makes the money,lasts).

I have also been heavily into conspiracy theories for 20 years, out of which have spawned the most ideas.

 

Lastly, i have all the qualities for a great games tester and would love a chance to prove myself on that front.

 

Any advice or input would be awesome.

It seems a shame i should be on welfare (not due to lazyness but simply no jobs at the mo)when i have the chance to be responsible for creating more awesome games for people to play and actually earn my cash doing the thing i love,creating game concepts.

 

Thank you for your time.

 

Peace.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement

There's a tutorial which answers this question pretty well - there's a stickied link in the game design forum, but here's a direct link: http://www.sloperama.com/advice/idea.htm

 

Basically, you can write a screenplay or a novel or a short story and then try to sell it.  Heck with the novel or short story you can self-publish it and sell it directly.  But you pretty much cannot sell a game design document; the game industry does not work the way the film industry does.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm moving this to the Job Advice board (it's not a Writing topic).


1. I have good ideas and want to get into the industry.
My problem is i have no computer skills, so i was wondering if i should just do them on paper first with lots of illustrations in order to maybe protect them (copyright etc) and once that is done try to sell it.
2. Does anybody know of a place which has use for someone who could come up with ideas on a weekly basis??
3. As for the quality of the ideas, i, like most i am sure, am 100% convinced that they are good.
4. i [sic] have all the qualities for a great games tester and would love a chance to prove myself on that front.

1. Yes, you need to write them down (otherwise they don't exist in any tangible form) but as the link from the previous respondent says, you can't sell them. In addition to the previous link, read http://www.sloperama.com/advice/lesson11.htm too.
2. No. No such job exists anywhere.
3. I am sure your ideas are great. But so what?
4. No, you don't. You don't capitalize the word "I," for one thing. Read http://www.sloperama.com/advice/lesson5.htm
If you want to apply for a job in games, don't do any of the "stupid tricks" in FAQ 24, and do the smart tricks in FAQ 27. And read FAQ 4.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tom already answered your questions, but I thought I would add my two cents on a few things.

 

1) Does anybody know of a place which has use for someone who could come up with ideas on a weekly basis??

 

2) I have played games for 27 years now and have been watching movies for just as long, so i know what is good (makes the money,lasts).

 

3) It seems a shame i should be on welfare (not due to lazyness but simply no jobs at the mo)

 

1) You come up with full game ideas on a weekly basis? How can that be useful to any company??? It takes 1-4 years to make a game. What use is a mountain of ideas? A true game designer needs to not only come up with ideas, but also how to use their resources (programmers, artists, animators, etc) to build their vision on time and on budget. It's not just telling people what to do either. They need to help design tools that will allow themselves to be productive working on the game. Game designers are often some of the hardest working members of a game team (this is coming from a programmer).

 

2) I would argue most 29 year olds have the same qualifications. You can't really claim these things without having actually done it yourself. I would also wager most terrible games start out with an amazing idea, otherwise who would have funded them? Deadlines and budgets are a very real thing in the real world and often, if a developer can't live up to their promises, it is cheaper for a publisher to cancel the game, or release it on schedule with minimal marketing knowing full well it's not fun and full of bugs.

 

3) If you want people to not perceive you as lazy, stop putting out a vibe of laziness (not the i, not y). What the hell does "simply no jobs at the mo" mean? Write properly for starters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello :) A few years ago my mindset was quite similar to yours, Robin, and well, I am really glad it changed. Here, maybe this will help:

 

http://www.gamesmakingnoob.com/2012/12/i-have-brilliant-game-idea.html

 

General advice would be:

- if you believe that you have an idea for a whole game, you are wrong. Nobody ever has one and even seasoned professionals, when they have an initial idea, don't know what the whole game will turn out like, even on paper.

- you simply can't always assess how good your ideas are. Having the idea of claiming you can pretty much proves you can't.

- don't give up - try to get into the industry. Search for vacancies, send resumes. If you are half as good as you think you are, sooner or later someone will invite you for an interview, where you will rock their socks off.

- don't get your hopes up too much - 99% of the people in the industry never get a chance to work on their own dream game idea. 

 

Cheers!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

GameDev.net is your game development community. Create an account for your GameDev Portfolio and participate in the largest developer community in the games industry.

Sign me up!