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dtg108

Unity Where do I begin WITHOUT an engine?

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If you are really into the behind the scenes stuff of game programming, you will first need to learn how to program and really love and understand programming. Once you understand general programming, then later you can learn how GUI and Graphics work in relation with your programming language.

 

Personally I only use Java for game development. I had to learn all the basics of Java before learning graphics too.

 

If you choose Java, you will need to download the Eclipse IDE and the JRE. All the libraries are built-into Eclipse so you won't need to worry about importing any libraries.

 

You would start making small simple console programs. Keeping pushing yourself to learn more. Always one up your programs!

 

Personally, I learned programming through the Internet and it is super helpful. Reading and programming is really the only things required.

 

Program and learn something new everyday and eventually you will have enough knowledge and be able to assemble these pieces of information to build a simple game.

Edited by warnexus

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That is a bit overkill if the OP says he/she has no background experience in programming.

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Why? I don't want the constraints. The problem is, I have no knowledge of anything programming or game design-wise (even terminology) so I need some help. 

 

If you don't like the constraints of the engine you probably won't like the constraints implied by "nothing" (which is practically all you'll have for a very long time after starting your own code with your current level of experience).

 

My advice is to stick it out with Unity.  Even if you want to do your own engine, you'll have a much better understand of what an engine can do or what your game needs after prototyping it in Unity.  There are good tutorials and the like for Unity which will be a better use of time right now than trying to learn how to write an engine for an unspecified game.

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Why? I don't want the constraints. The problem is, I have no knowledge of anything programming or game design-wise (even terminology) so I need some help. 

 

If you don't like the constraints of the engine you probably won't like the constraints implied by "nothing" (which is practically all you'll have for a very long time after starting your own code with your current level of experience).

 

My advice is to stick it out with Unity.  Even if you want to do your own engine, you'll have a much better understand of what an engine can do or what your game needs after prototyping it in Unity.  There are good tutorials and the like for Unity which will be a better use of time right now than trying to learn how to write an engine for an unspecified game.

 

 

 

you know - the problem with unity and such as they make things almost too easy... I think people who are looking to get in to game programming should stay away from these game engines until they make some games without them.. However, if the OP just wants to pump out a game as fast as possible then yeah, unity is the way to go

 

Its just that, once you make some basic 2d games or even 3d games using some less high level API (at least one without the fancy gui) like SDL or something (or even opengl or Direct3D for rendering ) you can appreciate what these GUI engine/toolkits like unity can do for you..

 

And in doing that - it forces you to actually learn how to program.. I don't think there is anything wrong with someone trying to get a sprite displayed on screen as one of their first programs... I don't really agree that people must learn to make games on the black console before they can make graphical games..

 

In summary - I would say check out sdl  http://www.libsdl.org/ and make it your goal to get a moving sprite on the screen - Learn whatever you need to learn to make that happen

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If you are having trouble with learning through Unity, an easy to use engine, I don't think you should go up and choose the harder path of programming without an engine.

Just to clarify, as OP said himself he doesn't know well the terminology, read a good definition here@wikipedia. Programming without an engine is really hard and cumbersome. It limits your language choices and takes months just to get started. Really not a good idea.

 

Believe me, you should use an engine, even if a simple one, while you're learning the basics.

If you are having difficulties, make it easier, not harder.

 

I'll just leave these links and names here (engines, frameworks and a language), in case you change your mind:

  • LOVE2D.org (Lua | my favorite for small projects)
  • PyGame.org (Phyton)
  • Haxe.org (It's an actual language, very promising)
  • Allegro.cc (C++)
  • SFML.org (C++)
  • ClanLib.org SDK (C++)
  • OpenGL and DirectX, Probably what most would define as programming without an engine, hardest way to get started with gamedev imho.

 

Ordered from the easiest to the hardest (save one or two).

These are the ones that popped in my mind, unlike Unity these are all free to use.

 

If you want to create simple game prototypes, go ahead and use GameMaker or Construct2 or Stencyl, any of these game making tools. Unity is overkill for simple prototyping of 2D games at a mobile game level of complexity.

Edited by dejaime

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My opinion of when to forego an engine and do it yourself:  If you are more interested in programming than in making a game.  As doing it yourself, you're really going to be spending a lot of time programming, and very little time making a game.  Which is totally fine, especially if you love programming.

 

If however, you have some burning desire to make a game or implement a game idea, you are probably better off using an existing engine, or you could end up bogged down in implementation details that don't really have anything to do with the game.

Edited by ferrous

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