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RudolfVonKrugstein

Estimating the Revenue generated by RevMob for a mobile game

6 posts in this topic

Hey,

 

I want to roughly estimate the revenue I can generate through RevMob for a mobile game.

I know that such a estimating can only be very approximating since to real Revenue depends on many factors which are just not predictable. But I need to estimation for an official application (or request? I do not know which is the correct english word) which will justify that I start the project.

So it would be very useful if the numbers I use  for the estimation can be justify by official sources.

 

This is what I came up with so far:

Let N be the number of downloads the app will generate. This number I will try to estimate by looking at the downloads of similar apps.

Let's assume that 10% of the downloads will generate a click and download for an app advertised by RevMob (this number comes just from my stomach, and I have no source for it).

A download will generate 1$ in revenue on average.

 

So my revenue will be:

N * (0.1) * 1$

 

What do you think?

 

Thanks!

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The word is "projection" or "target revenue." You need to plan for ways to increase it if it comes in under projection.
I think 10% is high for clickthroughs. I think 1% might be more like it.
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I use RevMob on my apps. Like Tom already stated you might not get 10% clickthroughs and you certainly will not get $1 per download. 

When your app stays too long without generating any download, when it does, then you might get $1 or even more. But if you have regular downloads you will most likely get a couple dimes.

Also, you will get some revenue (very low) from a high amount of banner "printings" even if they don't generate any clicks or downloads. 

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Hey,

 

Thanks for the replies. But I still do not get the numbers right. What exactly is "clickthroughrate"? That is the number of impressions being clicked, right? So the number of times my app is downloaded, and the number of downloads I generate for advertised games and not directly related through this ...

But I fear, this might not be the right way to get an estimation (correct me if I am wrong).

 

How about this: What eCPM can I expect from RevMob? In then net, I read numbers which seem to suggest, that I can expect 10$.

So if the game is downloaded N times, and I expect on average 5 Impressions per download, than my number would be:

 

N * 10$ * 5/1000

 

Is that realistic?

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For every ad network I'm aware of the payment rate is variable, and again your number seems high.

I'm curious about your ad placement. Why on Earth would you only display an ad when the game is downloaded? Ad-supported games will show ads after every level or otherwise encourage you to view ads at nearly every point in the game. An engaged player who plays for an hour may see 100 ads, although the source may have a cap per user that you would need to keep. If you have made the decision to release an ad-supported application, you don't display an advertisement once and call it done.

Ad support alone will not generate a significant revenue unless you have a hugely popular application. It does help so you can see a few cents from people who otherwise would not buy the game or make IAP, but don't expect ads alone to pay for any serious development costs. Ad-supported apps are a good thing because they can help with visibility and popularity; people can try your game without buying it. And ad-supported apps are good at helping with against the trivial pirates since it is often easier to get an ad-supported version for free than to risk the trojan-infected unlocked pirate version. It might bring in a bit of change every month if you are popular, but don't depend on the ad revenue as your primary income stream.
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Hey,

 

I seem to be make myself not very clear. I am not saying that I show only one add per download.

I said:


I expect on average 5 Impressions per download

How do I get 5? Just guessing. Some will download and play only once (so I get like 2 Impressions) and some will play very often.

 

Can you be a little bit more specific? Which of my numbers seem high? An eCPM of 10$? Or the 5 Impressions per download?

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A CPM impressions value of $10 is very high.

 

For mobile games, a popular game can expect around $1.02, up from $1.01 from the spring. For an obscure game, expect a value of $0.25 or less.  Not $10.

 

 

As for "ad impressions per download", that isn't a metric that really doesn't make sense to me.  It isn't a metric that is normally collected.  Metrics are things like conversion rates, DAU, average session lengths sliced into various market groups, and impressions per session.

 

So better questions might be:

* How many downloads actually convert into players, and why?

* How frequently do those players actually play?

* How long do each of those play sessions last? 

* How many of those players actually view ads? This is important since many install ad blockers on mobile devices.

 

Those are better questions you can ask.

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