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darkcreeder

Question about Blender and Gimp

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darkcreeder    123

I wasn't sure if I should make this here or in the 'For Beginners' forum. Basically, I'm planning on purchasing the Game Institute package, but there's one problem: they use 3ds Max and Photoshop in their tutorials for the 'Game Art and Animation' lessons. I can't afford one of those, let alone both. I asked a representative and he said it's possible to follow along with different programs, but difficult. So my question for you guys is: can I follow their tutorials using Blender and Gimp? I know I can look up tutorials for both online, but I don't want to pay for the lessons and not take advantage of them.

 

Here's a link to the website: http://www.gameinstitute.com/game-development/game-design.php

 

Thanks in advance.

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Tutorial Doctor    2573

I don't think you will want to do that. I have used both 3dsmax and Blender, and they are very different. Most software tutorials are "feature based" which means if you don't have a certain feature, you can't do what they ask. If they are teaching concepts, perhaps you could. But, don't spend any money on that. I make it my duty, as the name suggests to find tutorials, but I find good ones that are free and useful. 

 

I am forced myself to use Blender for modeling and creating game assets.

 

You could checkout cgCookie:

http://cgcookie.com/blender/

 

Also, for professional help you can try CgSociety:

http://www.cgsociety.org/

 

Look around before spending money on that though. 

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darkcreeder    123

Thanks for replying. I figured this would be the case. I still want the package for the game programming content, but I'll find separate tutorials for Blender and Gimp (thanks for the link, by the way). The most alluring part of the package for me is that it comes with digital textbooks. The tutorials just sweeten the deal. Normally it's $100, but it's on sale for $50 until the 25th.

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kburkhart84    3187

I wouldn't purchase such a thing unless I could use it.  Between 3dsmax and Blender there are so many differences, and there are many things that won't directly just transfer over.  At the least, many things in GIMP and photoshop can translate to each other, but there will still be things that won't just "work."

 

You have two solutions, find a way to get 3dsmax/photoshop, or find different tutorials.  I think you might be able to use a trial version of both, but those tend to last only a month, which may or may not be enough for you to use those tutorials, depending on your time and the time the tutorials take, as well as how fast you learn and do things.  The other option is to simply use other tutorials like suggested above.  Blender Guru has some pretty good Blender tutorials, as well as cgcookie mentioned above. And for GIMP, many photoshop tutorials can somewhat apply to GIMP, and moreso when you actually have an idea of where things are in GIMP.

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Kryzon    4630

This is for Blender:

http://www.cgmasters.net/training-dvds/

 

The Blender Foundation also has a "Store" section that sells training material:

http://www.blender3d.org/e-shop/

 

The Gnomon Workshop doesn't work with Blender, only commercial packages, but they have some theory DVDs that may be worth the purchase. The tutors have a lot of background:

http://www.thegnomonworkshop.com/store/product/185/Practical-Light-and-Color

http://www.thegnomonworkshop.com/store/product/981/Efficient-Cinematic-Lighting

 

For the GIMP I think there's enough free material online to become an advanced user of it. Maybe you don't need to spend on professional training.

http://www.gimp.org/tutorials/

Edited by Kryzon

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darkcreeder    123

You have two solutions, find a way to get 3dsmax/photoshop, or find different tutorials.  I think you might be able to use a trial version of both, but those tend to last only a month, which may or may not be enough for you to use those tutorials, depending on your time and the time the tutorials take, as well as how fast you learn and do things.  The other option is to simply use other tutorials like suggested above.  Blender Guru has some pretty good Blender tutorials, as well as cgcookie mentioned above. And for GIMP, many photoshop tutorials can somewhat apply to GIMP, and moreso when you actually have an idea of where things are in GIMP.

Blender Guru looks useful; thanks.

 

 

This is for Blender:

http://www.cgmasters.net/training-dvds/

 

The Blender Foundation also has a "Store" section that sells training material:

http://www.blender3d.org/e-shop/

 

The Gnomon Workshop doesn't work with Blender, only commercial packages, but they have some theory DVDs that may be worth the purchase. The tutors have a lot of background:

http://www.thegnomonworkshop.com/store/product/185/Practical-Light-and-Color

http://www.thegnomonworkshop.com/store/product/981/Efficient-Cinematic-Lighting

 

For the GIMP I think there's enough free material online to become an advanced user of it. Maybe you don't to spend on professional training.

http://www.gimp.org/tutorials/

I'm hoping there's enough free tutorials for Blender to get good with it, but I'll keep these links bookmarked. Thanks.

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darkcreeder    123

Quite a lot of information. It's a good thing I like to read smile.png Are most tutorials (the older ones) still valid? Meaning, are there changes in the current version of Blender that would make older tutorials not useful?

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ShadowFlar3    1258

Without prior knowledge of 2D/3D there's little hope of adapting what you see on one program to another. You should have the basic knowledge on the topic and one of the software to be able to follow tutorials on another program.

 

IMO when you can't afford Photoshop and Maya (which are totally unreasonably priced for individual learning outside schools that offer student licences) you shouldn't really pay for courses like that either. I wouldn't trust the reviews they have posted there blindfolded. "I got employed by EA" "I made an XBOX 360 game". It is misleading to imply that buying something for 49$ is going to yield you such results. It takes huge amount of time to learn how video games work, how you make them and how you make individual assets for them. Whether you pay 49$ or not doesn't matter, it just takes patience and dedication.

 

It doesn't matter much which software you use for learning. The free alternatives won't bottleneck the process, these days internet is full of resources to learn the exact thing you want to, for free. Unless you aim to get employed by the giant companies in the field you don't ever have to use Photoshop or Maya to make great games.

 

So what are you into most? Modeling, textures, game development? You can literally go to YouTube and search "my first 3d character" or "my first blender game" tutorial and get results in hours. That will build you a foundation you can use to build up your knowledge and refine your skills as you go.

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darkcreeder    123

Without prior knowledge of 2D/3D there's little hope of adapting what you see on one program to another. You should have the basic knowledge on the topic and one of the software to be able to follow tutorials on another program.

 

IMO when you can't afford Photoshop and Maya (which are totally unreasonably priced for individual learning outside schools that offer student licences) you shouldn't really pay for courses like that either. I wouldn't trust the reviews they have posted there blindfolded. "I got employed by EA" "I made an XBOX 360 game". It is misleading to imply that buying something for 49$ is going to yield you such results. It takes huge amount of time to learn how video games work, how you make them and how you make individual assets for them. Whether you pay 49$ or not doesn't matter, it just takes patience and dedication.

 

It doesn't matter much which software you use for learning. The free alternatives won't bottleneck the process, these days internet is full of resources to learn the exact thing you want to, for free. Unless you aim to get employed by the giant companies in the field you don't ever have to use Photoshop or Maya to make great games.

 

So what are you into most? Modeling, textures, game development? You can literally go to YouTube and search "my first 3d character" or "my first blender game" tutorial and get results in hours. That will build you a foundation you can use to build up your knowledge and refine your skills as you go.

I am aware of this. I have read all of the posts and articles that serve to deter the weak willed. To be honest, none of that matters to me. I'm not trying to magically become an expert programmer, modeler, ect., nor do I believe spending money will lead me to that outcome. The reviews aren't the reason I want to buy it; I didn't even look at them (I used Google to find information). I want to buy it because it includes a structured course for different subjects at an affordable price. I do believe that through studying, experience, and trial and error, I will steadily get better.

 

Don't get me wrong, I'm not disagreeing with you; the internet is full of useful resources, and I will use them when I need them. For example, I have decided to use Unity, which means I have to learn C#. I've already found a lot of helpful tutorials for both which I plan on watching/reading. I would still use them even if the Game Institute package offered lessons in C# (I believe it does have a couple for Unity). For $49.99, I like the amount of content you get.

 

As for what I'm into? I am actually interested in everything, partially because I do find it all interesting, and partially because I have no team to rely on at the moment. Either way, learning it now will only bring me closer to fulfilling my ambitions. I am currently unemployed and don't have to worry about rent, so I have time.

Edited by darkcreeder

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ShadowFlar3    1258
I'm not trying to magically become an expert programmer, modeler, ect., nor do I believe spending money will lead me to that outcome. The reviews aren't the reason I want to buy it; I didn't even look at them (I used Google to find information).

 

 

 

Aye, sorry I didn't mean to imply that. I'm just very disappointed in how these things are marketed.

 

Internet is pretty abundant on impatient beginners that think they can just start making their dream game straight up but it does look like you got the right spirit, willing to take the time and money if necessary first to learn about game development.

 

I want to buy it because it includes a structured course for different subjects at an affordable price. I do believe that through studying, experience, and trial and error, I will steadily get better.

 

 

 

 

It's true, I bet there's a lot of relevant info packed tightly together. But still it doesn't really begin covering the whole scope of workflow that people use to make different kinds of games. From subtext I read it is for pretty professional 3D games that usually have a budget and team. I'm just worried this information while useful to know in general won't give you the best overview on game development even for the buck.

 

For example, I have decided to use Unity, which means I have to learn C#. I've already found a lot of helpful tutorials for both which I plan on watching/reading. I would still use them even if the Game Institute package offered lessons in C# (I believe it does have a couple for Unity).

 

 

That's the right attitude. As long as you check the free resources first you're of course encouraged to invest in something that isn't covered by them. :)

 

For $49.99, I like the amount of content you get.

 

 

True, but let's keep in mind this includes pretty specific workflows inside expensive professional software. But not knowing the course I can't say whether it provides you with the basic set of knowledge over creation pipeline or whether it relies and making those "wow" models and textures inside them to try to lure in some specific people in that field.

 

As for what I'm into? I am actually interested in everything, partially because I do find it all interesting, and partially because I have no team to rely on at the moment. Either way, learning it now will only bring me closer to fulfilling my ambitions. I am currently unemployed and don't have to worry about rent, so I have time.

 

 

 

You're in a pretty ideal situation :)

 

I want to push you into learning by doing something now while you still consider if you really want to buy some course. I think the course could benefit you greatly if you first grasp the overall concepts of game development and the tools and still see the course takes you to the direction you want to go.

 

But I also understand if you want to invest a small amount of money like that into it so you get that "kickstart" feeling and keep yourself motivated.

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darkcreeder    123

 

I'm not trying to magically become an expert programmer, modeler, ect., nor do I believe spending money will lead me to that outcome. The reviews aren't the reason I want to buy it; I didn't even look at them (I used Google to find information).

 

 

 

Aye, sorry I didn't mean to imply that. I'm just very disappointed in how these things are marketed.

 

Internet is pretty abundant on impatient beginners that think they can just start making their dream game straight up but it does look like you got the right spirit, willing to take the time and money if necessary first to learn about game development.

 

I want to buy it because it includes a structured course for different subjects at an affordable price. I do believe that through studying, experience, and trial and error, I will steadily get better.

 

 

 

 

It's true, I bet there's a lot of relevant info packed tightly together. But still it doesn't really begin covering the whole scope of workflow that people use to make different kinds of games. From subtext I read it is for pretty professional 3D games that usually have a budget and team. I'm just worried this information while useful to know in general won't give you the best overview on game development even for the buck.

 

For example, I have decided to use Unity, which means I have to learn C#. I've already found a lot of helpful tutorials for both which I plan on watching/reading. I would still use them even if the Game Institute package offered lessons in C# (I believe it does have a couple for Unity).

 

 

That's the right attitude. As long as you check the free resources first you're of course encouraged to invest in something that isn't covered by them. smile.png

 

For $49.99, I like the amount of content you get.

 

 

True, but let's keep in mind this includes pretty specific workflows inside expensive professional software. But not knowing the course I can't say whether it provides you with the basic set of knowledge over creation pipeline or whether it relies and making those "wow" models and textures inside them to try to lure in some specific people in that field.

 

As for what I'm into? I am actually interested in everything, partially because I do find it all interesting, and partially because I have no team to rely on at the moment. Either way, learning it now will only bring me closer to fulfilling my ambitions. I am currently unemployed and don't have to worry about rent, so I have time.

 

 

 

You're in a pretty ideal situation smile.png

 

I want to push you into learning by doing something now while you still consider if you really want to buy some course. I think the course could benefit you greatly if you first grasp the overall concepts of game development and the tools and still see the course takes you to the direction you want to go.

 

But I also understand if you want to invest a small amount of money like that into it so you get that "kickstart" feeling and keep yourself motivated.

 

 

It's no problem. The amount of beginners thinking they'll make an AAA quality game on their first try isn't even funny.

 

Somebody actually ended up giving me $50 for the holidays, so I pretty much got it for free smile.png

 

Honestly, I don't think developing a quality game is as difficult as people make it out to be. Yes, it's hard and takes work, not to mention skill, but with the access we have (for example, the Unity Asset Store), the development process is a good deal easier. But as I said, you still need skill (and money). For somebody like me, who will probably have to work as a one-man team, something like the Asset Store will be extremely useful.

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riuthamus    8365

I wasn't sure if I should make this here or in the 'For Beginners' forum. Basically, I'm planning on purchasing the Game Institute package, but there's one problem: they use 3ds Max and Photoshop in their tutorials for the 'Game Art and Animation' lessons. I can't afford one of those, let alone both. I asked a representative and he said it's possible to follow along with different programs, but difficult. So my question for you guys is: can I follow their tutorials using Blender and Gimp? I know I can look up tutorials for both online, but I don't want to pay for the lessons and not take advantage of them.

 

Here's a link to the website: http://www.gameinstitute.com/game-development/game-design.php

 

Thanks in advance.

 

So buy a service that provides you with all. I use digital tutors and they give you full access to well over 200+ forms of software. They have learning lessons for all areas and are fairly cheap considering what they offer. This is where I learned most of my animation skills and this was from me knowing NOTHING about maya. I am by no means a god at animation now but I can certainly hold my own with some of the industry vets. I have even used some of their advanced tutorials for learning some stuff I never imagined about photoshop and other tools I have been using for 10+ years.

 


Honestly, I don't think developing a quality game is as difficult as people make it out to be. Yes, it's hard and takes work, not to mention skill, but with the access we have (for example, the Unity Asset Store), the development process is a good deal easier. But as I said, you still need skill (and money). For somebody like me, who will probably have to work as a one-man team, something like the Asset Store will be extremely useful.

 

While you make some good points it is key to note that making a game using EXISTING engines is not hard. Unity is very robust and does most of the heavy lifting for you. Try making a game yourself from the ground up and you will find a much different story. Not that I would urge anybody to do that, just wanted to make what you were saying clear.

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Serapth    6671

Well, since you want to learn Blender, have a limited budget and all the time in the world, why not run through [url=http://www.gamefromscratch.com/www.gamefromscratch.com/page/Complete-Blender-Game-Art-Tutorial-From-zero-experience-to-2D-or-3D-game-ready-asset.aspx]my Blender tutorial series[/url].  It's long, covers just about everything you need to know from complete beginner to actually creating game ready art in Blender, oh, and it's completely free! :)

 

 

As to The GIMP... ugh.  I try to like it, I even use it on occasion, but it is really horrible software.  Things like placing text are an exercise in futility.  If you want a paint program, Paint.NET gets you most of the way there... just wish it had better cloning tools...  otherwise, if you have a tablet, I highly recommend you drop 10$ and pick up Photoshop.

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darkcreeder    123


While you make some good points it is key to note that making a game using EXISTING engines is not hard. Unity is very robust and does most of the heavy lifting for you. Try making a game yourself from the ground up and you will find a much different story. Not that I would urge anybody to do that, just wanted to make what you were saying clear

 

The thought of building an engine from scratch makes me cringe, but I do want to try it. Maybe in a couple of years when I have more experience.

 


Well, since you want to learn Blender, have a limited budget and all the time in the world, why not run through my Blender tutorial series. It's long, covers just about everything you need to know from complete beginner to actually creating game ready art in Blender, oh, and it's completely free!

 

Ah, thanks for that smile.png I'll be sure to check them out.

 


As to The GIMP... ugh. I try to like it, I even use it on occasion, but it is really horrible software. Things like placing text are an exercise in futility. If you want a paint program, Paint.NET gets you most of the way there... just wish it had better cloning tools... otherwise, if you have a tablet, I highly recommend you drop 10$ and pick up Photoshop

 

Don't you have to own one of their products to be eligible? I looked it up, and it seems I missed out on the deal for everybody sad.png Does using a tablet really make that big of a difference (with everything)? I've been looking at a Wacom tablet on Amazon, but I need to save up the money for it.

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darkcreeder    123

My bad; I hadn't realized there was a mobile version. It's only $10? I was thinking about getting a tablet, so this is certainly something to look into. Is it easy to import/export back and forth between a tablet and computer?

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Serapth    6671

My bad; I hadn't realized there was a mobile version. It's only $10? I was thinking about getting a tablet, so this is certainly something to look into. Is it easy to import/export back and forth between a tablet and computer?

 

Somewhat.  If you use the free Creative Cloud service, its stupidly simple.  Otherwise its a bit of a two step process.

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3Ddreamer    3826

Hi,

 

 

My only concern is that, though Blender and GIMP give professional results, you are going to have a good month or two of hard work in learning enough about these software to become effective in a workflow pipeline.  By that time you will still be on fundamentals for the most part.   You need to estimate if this will allow you to keep pace with all that you have in the course or not.   Best case scenario, in my opinion, is that you will be scrambling with at least twice the workload to adapt Blender and GIMP to a course not designed for them.

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darkcreeder    123

 

My bad; I hadn't realized there was a mobile version. It's only $10? I was thinking about getting a tablet, so this is certainly something to look into. Is it easy to import/export back and forth between a tablet and computer?

 

Somewhat.  If you use the free Creative Cloud service, its stupidly simple.  Otherwise its a bit of a two step process.

 

 

Is there a specific tablet you would suggest?

 

 

Hi,

 

 

My only concern is that, though Blender and GIMP give professional results, you are going to have a good month or two of hard work in learning enough about these software to become effective in a workflow pipeline.  By that time you will still be on fundamentals for the most part.   You need to estimate if this will allow you to keep pace with all that you have in the course or not.   Best case scenario, in my opinion, is that you will be scrambling with at least twice the workload to adapt Blender and GIMP to a course not designed for them.

 

I'm not in a rush to learn everything at once. Doing that would probably bring poor results. Right now I'm trying to focus on C#, but I'll most likely watch some Blender tutorials on the side.

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3Ddreamer    3826

Right now I'm trying to focus on C#, but I'll most likely watch some Blender tutorials on the side.

 

Many game developers initially under estimate the amount of work needed to effectively learn a graphics software such as Blender, just so you know.   However, if you only want to learn a few things so you can merely import and export in a model file format for the purposes of your game source code development, then there should be no major obstacle.

Edited by 3Ddreamer

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darkcreeder    123

Many game developers initially under estimate the amount of work needed to effectively learn a graphics software such as Blender, just so you know. However, if you only want to learn a few things so you can merely import and export in a model file format for the purposes of your game source code development, then there should be no major obstacle.

 

Pretty much that. I'm trying to get my friend to study the art aspects of game design, that way I won't need to learn everything.

 

Do you know of any tutorials that focus on getting a character model ready to put in a game? I want to put a character in a level and play around with it to see what I learn. I found some models on http://tf3dm.com/ but I'm not sure what to do with them, or if they're even low-poly enough to use.

Edited by darkcreeder

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Tutorial Doctor    2573

Do you know of any tutorials that focus on getting a character model ready to put in a game?

 

You could use Mixamo:

http://www.mixamo.com

 

Or you could use Iclone:

http://www.reallusion.com/iclone/

 

Each has costs and such, but requires less knowledge of 3d modeling and such just to get started with models. 

Edited by Tutorial Doctor

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3Ddreamer    3826




Do you know of any tutorials that focus on getting a character model ready to put in a game?

 

The Blender community has tons of tutorials and so does YouTube. There are plenty of third party communities and tutorials that cover Blender, even in some obscure websites. 

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