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xbattlestation

"mygame.exe is not commonly downloaded"...

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I've put a download (not currently public) of my game on my website, but I get the following message in Chrome, and a similar one in IE when I download it:

 

Hlz2tEq.png

 

What can I do to make this process nicer for downloaders?

 

I've done a bit of searching, and found three possible answers, none of them concrete though:

 

  • Register site with Google's Webmaster Tools - I've done this, and I guess I may have to wait a few days for it to process.  I'm not yet convinced this will actually change the "not commonly downloaded" message though.
  • Wait until the .exe is downloaded x number of times - I read somewhere once it is downloaded 20 times (or some similar number), this message will go away.  Again, not convinced.
  • Digitally sign my installer - So again I'm not convinced this will actually change the "not commonly downloaded" message, I think it will change the "install program from xyz" message that comes later?  Also, what is the point in signing my program if I'm going to be providing regular updates?

Right now I'm just providing instructions to get around these nasty messages.  If anyone has actual experience with removing this message, please let me know what you did!

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Th

Just send it to a compressed zip file and upload it.


Thanks but I'm looking for the 'correct' way of sharing a .exe

 

 

Considering transmitting .exe files through email usually fails if you just attach them, and smaller downloads are better for servers and user bandwidth, I don't see the harm in transmitting through the internet this way.

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Yep, the 'correct' way of sharing .exes is not sharing plain .exes at all but wrapping them in a compressed file or an installer.

 

I have an installer, it is an .exe smile.png

 

 

 

 

Considering transmitting .exe files through email usually fails if you just attach them, and smaller downloads are better for servers and user bandwidth, I don't see the harm in transmitting through the internet this way.

 

 

The file is 50MB - too big for email.

Edited by xbattlestation

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Wait until the .exe is downloaded x number of times - I read somewhere once it is downloaded 20 times (or some similar number), this message will go away.

Would that be the NSA watching the number of downloads and letting users know locally about the relative safety, or is there some murkier global organization involved?

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Would that be the NSA watching the number of downloads and letting users know locally about the relative safety, or is there some murkier global organization involved?

Yes, there is - Microsoft, in the case of Ie, and google for chrome.

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Yep, the 'correct' way of sharing .exes is not sharing plain .exes at all but wrapping them in a compressed file or an installer.

 

I have an installer, it is an .exe smile.png

 

 

Then you should consider making an MSI instead. It is pretty bad idea to download a *.exe.

 

-Josh

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I wonder that people actually object to offering an executable which is an installer for download. When, at the same time, mainstream companies like Adobe and even FOSS portals like Sourceforge not only do the same, but even worse.

 

They distribute executables that will download content from untrusted sources without any possibility to verify or control what is being downloaded, and they use drive-by installs (mostly McAfee or Ask) to which the user "consents" by not reading the small print. But... that's OK.

 

Also, offering a zip file with an executable or a MSI is really none more secure. It's the same thing. You get to execute/install something, no matter how this is a risk.

 

Back to topic: Signing your executable will at least help you with Internet Explorer, though not immediately (however, it seems that without signing, you'll never get rid of that message, since "reputation" is based on the certificate). It might be worth trying to do a virus scan on your computer and/or uploading it to Virustotal.com since Antivirus companies usually have a way of back-communicating info on scanned executable files (if enabled, that is). Microsoft states that they include listings from AV software in their consideration, so it might actually help having your software "seen" by them.

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