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      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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AhmedCoeia

Know too much in theory but practice ?

9 posts in this topic

Hi All,

 

I'm an EE, I know computer science by myself, studied c++, game programming since I was 13 years old. I do know too much about Electronics Engineering, Embedded Systems, firmware,..etc. 

At the same time I know theory of computer science, you can ask me about algorithms, data structures,  I can tell you yes selection sort is a sorting algorithm with complexity  O(n2), in 3D game programming, I know about spatial data structures, skeletal animation,..etc. I read too much, but I practised very few. I didn't write too much code. I'm currently 27 years old, tried to apply for qualcomm, google, found problems in applying code on board, I also find problems in solving algorithms on my own... 

 

I'm thinking about doing my msc and PhD, and keep being knowledgable but didn't practice much ? or what should I do ? 

 

are anyone like me too here ?

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No, not me.

 

But I have heard that to be able to be your profession while you are learning it is a rare thing. 

 

Although there could be more awesome things as far as I know, to have the capacity to learn and do simultaneously with programming would be fascinating.

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I'd like to be the first to say, you can always start practicing now. You may have to acknowledge at some point that you have a great interest in learning about the subject, rather than applying it.  It is always worth your time to figure yourself out.

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I'm confused as why you would spend all that time learning something and not want to or be excited about using it. That just doesn't compute for me. The reason I got into coding is because I wanted to create things on the computer. Why did you get into them?

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I was curious on how games work and how electronics work. :( 

When I knew the reasons, even in details, I stopped :/,  I felt that I dont need any practise 

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Write more code.  For me, there is no way I can go by without understanding the practical knowledge, which is vastly different than theoretical knowledge.

 

For example, you can go read the Oauth2 specification.  If you read from top to bottom, front to back, you will understand how it works, and it's actually quite simple and makes sense.  But, go ahead try to implement it.  Holy fuck, the amount of details you need to worry about is a lot - data modeling, security, api design, etc.  These are the things that are not covered by the theory, and they are perhaps more important than the theory.

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Yea but in which area ? The problem that I distracted my mind into a lot of topics, firmware, game programming, computer vision, data structures :(

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Yea but in which area ? The problem that I distracted my mind into a lot of topics, firmware, game programming, computer vision, data structures sad.png

What is it about these things that you like? Can you enjoy talking about them?

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I was curious on how games work and how electronics work. sad.png

When I knew the reasons, even in details, I stopped :/,  I felt that I dont need any practise 

 

It's not about feeling that you need practice, it's about WANTING to do it. If you don't want to do these things then you probably don't have much of a passion for them. Find something you do have a passion for.

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I feel as if practise is just theory nobody bothered to write down, because theres so much of this. Eg. if we take "good code" guidelines, we mostly have overly unspecific guidelines which can be used to analyse code to decide whether its good or bad through a long and tedious process (since being abstract you cant directly apply them), and practise is mostly just going more specific (as in memorizing how these guidelines apply to certain things so you dont have to think about it each time)

 

So, theory is the knowledge you can use to find a solution, and practise is a process of derieving more specific knowledge from the nonspecific theoretical knowledge such that you can apply it without spending days thinking about it each time.

 

Since you are interested in theory, look at practise as forming more specific theoretical knowledge (which you might as well write down if you feel like it). Instead of being given the theory, you must create it yourself. Im sure you could find pieces from various sources, but these are pieces and thus not very useful considering that you need a ton of such knowledge and will probably forget them anyways if you just read them without actually needing them at the moment.

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