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Have you made a game engine

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Been searching google for things like "my 3d game engine project" to see already created engines and how long it took but no new results so i thought to ask here.
I just wanna know how long it took to get the 3d game engine to a usable state (years/months). How many/what libraries you use (ogre, fmod, directx, physx, havok, qt, cegui etc.) and if c++, which language
Thanks :).

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At work we have been making a C++ 3D engine which favours portability above all else. The technology used varies per platform (The only common part is OpenGL).

 

Some of the tech used for desktop platforms is Xlib/glx, libpng, openal, libogg/libvorbis.

The consumer platforms (Android / iOS) use the underlying platform's stuff but wrapped with C APIs similar to the desktop counterparts to minimize #ifdefs and other changes to the core games.

 

All the model loading, animation and physics is bespoke and written in C (with C++ wrappers) so is perfectly portable to everything.

 

To get it up to a usable state ready for games it took two of us a couple of months. It is unlikely to be as advanced as Hodgman's but as an "indie" studio, we currently need to battle with tablet / phone support and all the gimmicky short lived technology that it brings.

Edited by Karsten_

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Depending on what resources you use, you could bust one out from the ground up in six to eight months, but if you really wanta great one, I'd say you have a good 2014 goal for the year :P

EDIT: if you're just building one for one game and not super rigorous, you could build one in a few months.

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Great.
@aggie: It'll be for most of my games after i'm done.
@hodgman: Great to see you made a game engine using a bunch of what i want to use too (c++, lua, physx, directx, fmod) ... and in a year.

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Ask me at the end of January about it (you can PM), if you are still interested. I am developing an open source game engine, and it is not very fancy, but it is 3D and a lot of parts are made from scratch. I might use RakNet, though, that is a possiblity. I haven't made any multiplayer features in it yet. Because it is open source (GPL, to be specific), no one will really use it, but you will be free to if you so choose. I am using OpenGL and SDL for pretty much everything else. It is being written in pure ANSI C, functional-style (not OOP-style). I said that to describe it to the reader. I want to start no debates, I beg of you. I might post pictures and such on a different thread, if I am not too embarassed.

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@flyingsatin: The gpl license (...). If you are making everything from scratch, i'll like to know about it because i might make some things from scratch for the engine.
With the features (not the libraries) i plan on putting in the engine(s), it is unlikely the source code will be available or it'll be free but they'll be inexpensive (big dreams) and no royalties (don't like'em).

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I read somewhere that couple of experienced programmers can create a 3d engine from scratch within two months. Hope that answeres your question. But the for starters it maky take longer. Basically if the objective of a 3d engine is to only create a 3d pong, then begineers can make it in 3-4 weeks.

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@flyingsatin: The gpl license (...). If you are making everything from scratch, i'll like to know about it because i might make some things from scratch for the engine.
With the features (not the libraries) i plan on putting in the engine(s), it is unlikely the source code will be available or it'll be free but they'll be inexpensive (big dreams) and no royalties (don't like'em).

 
Just fyi, if any part of a codebase uses GPL, the entire codebase must be licensed under GPL or equivalent. This means, if you use GPL code in a library, game, or engine, you don't have a choice of whether it's opensource or not: It is legally required to be opensource by the license.
 
Also note: LGPL is different than GPL, and is more lax in some ways, permitting LGPL in closed-source software, as long as the LGPL code is dynamically linked instead of statically compiled in (though there is some discussion about permitting static compiling also). Basically, the idea with LGPL is that any changes to the LGPL part of the project needs to be re-shared with the world, but any code that uses the LGPL libraries don't have to be shared. :)
 
There's other nuances there, but I just wanted to make sure you understood that GPL doesn't give you the option of saying, "it is unlikely the source code will be available or free" if you decide to use GPL code in your project. :mellow:

That's why am not using any gpl stuff. Gonna pay for qt (lgpl)

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