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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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I'm an experienced programmer with many years of experience architecting and developping commercial applications (used to design computer chips).  Over the years, I've used many languages and could easily learn another one.  C++ is what I've used the most. 

 

I always look for new challenges, and always was curious about game programming.  I would like to get a bit more serious about it.

I did some research and quickly became "information overloaded". 

 

I think a good way would to be start using one of the engine and play with it for a while.  What is the best engine for an avid programmer but novice game developper?

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I can personally recommend Unity - although I may be a bit biased due to the fact that it is the only "real" game engine that I've used. It has an easy to learn interface, which only took me a day to get the hang of. It is very easy to use, and has many online tutorials, scripts, and animations that you can use. It is very good for beginners as well as more advanced programmers and game developers.
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Hi,

 

What is the best engine for an avid programmer but novice game developper?

 

 

Especially since you are a very experienced coder, you need to look at the specifications and documentation for several game engines to decide which ones fit you. You have that technical experience to know which ones will greatly utilize your skills after deep research.  

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_game_engines

 

Make sure to choose a game engine which most closely fits your experience, desire, and your previous workflow pipeline (for examples, Visual Studio or other IDE), because all the best game engines have a kind of default workflow pipeline tailored to a particular set of software and applications (some for Java IDE, Blender IDE, Visual Studio IDE, 3DS Max, and so forth.)  Have the best fit game engine!  Don't abandon your best experiences and already in place IDE and other major tools but find the game engine that best fits what you know.  Do not try to reinvent the wheel.

 

Usually I would recommend Unity 3D as one of the top game engines but you seem to actually be over-qualified, which is rare.  Look for a game engine which is heavy in C++ for the core and at least one other language (such as C#, Python, or Lua) for the game function scripting, particularly end-user functions to be scripted.  I assume that you have little or no 2D and 3D graphics art experience so you need to find a game engine with a big community of artists to provide you with assets at least in early stages, but you can use place-holders in Alpha versions of a game. 

 

Think very much in terms of assembling a total workflow pipeline, with early emphasis on model and texture file formats, GUIs, Class Files, physics libraries (such as Bullet Physics, or other), dlls, and increase complexity with version control that is similar to what you are already used to using, like Git or something.  Broaden your scope of development early but simple and increase complexity with following cycles of development in versions of the game source code.  Use as many already existing libraries under legitimate license as practical.   As if this is not already too much, do not spread yourself too thin and take too much or you will screech to a halt and have to reassess your strategy.  If your early iterations are very simple but increasing with new versions then you should be alright. Place holders are very important so you don't spend too much time on art assets in early iterations.

 

An experienced coder like you needs to know what types of things are in a 3D model folder.  For example, a model folder for an army tank might

 have the model file, texture file, material file, various map files, animation files, effects file, sometimes a model configuration file, and potentially a few others.  The 3D model creation software such as Blender, Maya, 3DS Max, and others can usually be manipulated by you to include all of these into one model folder (for example: tnk1, tnk2, etc. - the names of them) but in some cases place a particular file such as the texture file outside of the model folder if needed by the game engine or needed for modding (open modification).  Game engines have these specifications according to a workflow pipeline as expressed in the documentation for the engine and you can get help from the community around the engine, too.

 

Look at Unreal (UDK), Torque 3D, Unity 3D, SFML, and CryEngine as your first priorities for consideration, in your experience situation.

 

Set achievable weekly and daily goals and be sure to keep it satisfying and rewarding.  smile.png

 

 

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For engines that use c++ and lua, i only know of leadwerks and cryengine (i'ld choose leadwerks over cryengine if you want to make money from your games).
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I'm an experienced programmer with many years of experience architecting and developping commercial applications (used to design computer chips).  Over the years, I've used many languages and could easily learn another one.  C++ is what I've used the most. 

 

I always look for new challenges, and always was curious about game programming.  I would like to get a bit more serious about it.

I did some research and quickly became "information overloaded". 

 

I think a good way would to be start using one of the engine and play with it for a while.  What is the best engine for an avid programmer but novice game developper?

 

I would go for Unity3D . It is easy to learn the basics and also has power for later when you become more experienced with it. It is high priced for the pro version, but it is well worth it. It's been used by companies to make some AAA games. It has lots of power and anything you want to do in a game can be done with it.

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