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      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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Ironmaggot

How to start with creating a strategy game ?

6 posts in this topic

I want to create a space grand strategy game, similar to Neptunes Pride. I wrote basic engine for this game in python to get knack of writing a game, but now I want to start it over.

 

I am just a guy programming as a hobby in my spare time, so I do not want to commit any money onto this project.

 

So, I am looking for a starting point.

 

 

Some description about the concept of the game.

 

The game is essentially a sandbox strategy game. Player controls his empire and does whatever of the 4X he wants. There are enemy empires. Enemy empires are controlled by Utility-AI(each empire has different traits and responds to stuff according to these traits). For example Agressive empire would respond to events with military actions more frquently than a passive empire.

 

I don't belive that visual side is going to tax computer in any way. But it seems that in later part of the games development AI might take most of the processing power. So, again what should be my first starting point in making that game?

 

Should I learn Java and search for some library that can blit sprites and can draw lines and circles on screen? Or should I use GameMaker and somehow make some kind of AI module to it in python? Or should I learn C++ and find some open-source engine that has basic graphical features present?

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The question of which language you should learn is obsolete, because with all languages you named it is possible to achieve what you want. Each language has their pro and contra to choose them. So in first you should ask with which of them you already familiar or you like most. That would be the right choice for you.

The graphical stuff you can choose a framework which do the work for you for example ogre, angle, .... etc but the logic of your game which components interact with each other or not is still up to you in all languages or gamemaker software. Plus the ai of course.

In my opinion you should start to create all visual things. The reason for this opinion is simple: you see results/progress! After you done that stuff you can still add an ai.

 

To expand off of what exOfde has mentioned, putting language and environment aside, I would take your loose requirements and try to turn it into a real requirements document.  It doesn't have to be more than a page, but it pretty much outlines for you what need to do to go from "nothing" to prototype.  Your starting point depends on where you want to start,, obviously the real starting point is pressing the power button on your PC.  But jokes aside, write your requirements document and consider it your mini-bible; ideas will flow when you are writing it.  Once done, pick any environment that can meet those requirements; if you want to make a prototype of the game, you dont want to have to program the engine, your goal is to show something in the end and then iterate off it.

 

 

I am not familiar with the term "requirements document". Do you mean design document?

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I wouldn't worry about graphics in a strategy game? If it is tile based you could just use ASCII and if not just use squares, triangles, cubes etc.?

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The question of which language you should learn is obsolete, because with all languages you named it is possible to achieve what you want. Each language has their pro and contra to choose them. So in first you should ask with which of them you already familiar or you like most. That would be the right choice for you.

The graphical stuff you can choose a framework which do the work for you for example ogre, angle, .... etc but the logic of your game which components interact with each other or not is still up to you in all languages or gamemaker software. Plus the ai of course.

In my opinion you should start to create all visual things. The reason for this opinion is simple: you see results/progress! After you done that stuff you can still add an ai.

 

To expand off of what exOfde has mentioned, putting language and environment aside, I would take your loose requirements and try to turn it into a real requirements document.  It doesn't have to be more than a page, but it pretty much outlines for you what need to do to go from "nothing" to prototype.  Your starting point depends on where you want to start,, obviously the real starting point is pressing the power button on your PC.  But jokes aside, write your requirements document and consider it your mini-bible; ideas will flow when you are writing it.  Once done, pick any environment that can meet those requirements; if you want to make a prototype of the game, you dont want to have to program the engine, your goal is to show something in the end and then iterate off it.

 

 

I am not familiar with the term "requirements document". Do you mean design document?

 

Yes, they all lead to the same conclusion, however being that you want to prototype something quickly I would settle for a non-official document; consider a requirements document in your case a subset of a design document.  Just list what it is that your game needs so that someone could just jump into your game and have some fun.

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