• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Oliviero Nardi

scripting and unity3D

12 posts in this topic

Hi again people!

So yesterday I've asked here some informations about physics engines and how to write a game engine. After some research, I understood that for now it would be best to learn a bit how an engine works before trying to write my own engine. So, I've tried two engines: cryengine and unity3D. I didn't like cryengine, so I'll stick with U3D. I've understood some of the basic things and such, but now I'm stuck. I guess that to do all those fancy videogames stuff (like , I don't know, programming the AI?) You need always scripts, am I right? Well, my question is, where do I learn to use those scripts? Give that I can't use C# (but I know C++), is there a manual or something? Because while I'm able to code, I don't know how to make a script for unity. Any book or online tutorials on that? The more detailed the better. 

 

edit: should I try UDK ? Which is more simple? Which is more beginner-like?

Edited by GarrettTheThief
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The projects on the unity page are quite nice to work through. The first one touches on some of the basic concepts and the third one goes into more advanced coding techniques. 

 

http://unity3d.com/learn/tutorials/projects

 

There is also a manual that explains the theory behind unity concepts and a reference guide that can be used to check functions and search for a specific behavior etc.

 

http://unity3d.com/learn/documentation

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you! I don't know why I did not find that before. It also contains a stealth game tutorial! Perfect!
 

edit: may also ask: do I need to learn C#? Or is C++ enough?

Edited by GarrettTheThief
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, when I started with Unity I also only knew C++. You'll find that the syntax is almost exactly like C++. So instead of learning C#, do the tutorials and get familiar with the syntax but focus your efforts towards understanding the Unity API. Because the majority of your programming will be based on functions/variables that already exist within Unity.

 

Goodluck smile.png

Edited by PragmaOnce
2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Given your username and your excitement about the tutorials having a stealth project, I think I can guess what kind of project you'll be working on, taffer...

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Given your username and your excitement about the tutorials having a stealth project, I think I can guess what kind of project you'll be working on, taffer...

Oh yes you can!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is also the Unity Youtube Chanel, wich contains a lot of video tutorials for both scripting and learning to work with the editor.

I suggest for you to watch some of the videos to learn the basic workflow for the engine.

 

Hope that helps.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unity is more beginner-like than UDK (by far, in my opinion) and gives you a cleaner way to get code into your game.

 

All you need is to get good with C# and programming in general, and learn the Unity classes (GameObject and Transform are important).  All you've gotta do is write a script and drop it on something in the game to get the code running.

 

I would suggest using Visual Studio C# Express or MonoDevelop to write your code.  They have convenient features that will help you in the future.

 

Bookmark/favorite these pages, they're very useful to have around for when you need them:

  • This one for the search bar; it lets you search any class in Unity and see all of the methods and variables inside it
  • This one to find information about specific components and how to use them (such as colliders, rigidbodies, lights, etc.)
  • This one for whenever you need to configure your colliders/rigidbodies; it's helpful because at the bottom of the page it gives you a chart of which kinds of colliders will collide with others
  • This one for all you need to know about C# syntax

 

Also, since I believe you're programming a 3D game, you should know how Vector3's work if you don't already.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you guys! It really sucks that it isn't c++ compatible, though.

Yeah. The only c++ engines i've seen are cryengine and leadwerks (between those 2, leadwerks even though it isn't free but it's cheaper than unity pro, last time i checked)
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are interested in the art side of this, then perhaps you can use the Thief III engine to create your game. There have been a few decent mods so far and the original developers have also provided the Thief 3 Editor (a modified udk 2.x editor). I think it even provides basic scripting facilities.

 

If you are interested primarily in the technical stuff and want to develop an engine with realtime shadows etc... for your game, then personally I wouldnt bother with products like Unity and suggest you go directly to OpenGL (or DirectX if you want to sacrifice portability). Not only will you find this more flexible, but you also can avoid some of the bagage required by Unity and other generic engines. ( .NET, Proprietary, etc...)

Edited by Karsten_
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0