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Glass_Knife

Hobbies for game developers

61 posts in this topic

when Im not drawing Im programming, and vice versa

i started with 2d animation, really interested

i used to run a lot, my mom run on marathons and is always inviting me, once in a while I go..Im good in the resistance side of exercises

i used to practice kung fu, but takes too much time, and I find that if I dont dedicate 100% to it its kind pointless, kung fu is all about going super sayan if you get what I mean

i need to get the fuck out of youtube procrastination, not signing for google+ (being not able to comment) didnt help at all

i want to get a piece of Styrofoam and practice card throwing again, I recently figured out i totally lost my technique

i want to get my engine round to start work on a 2d platformer >_<, Im not inspired by the card game Im doing anymore, but its helping a lot w/ the engine, so Im kinda in a zombie mode, it sucks

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Get a helicopter!

Hodgman no helicopters yet ?, be warned : really addictive.

Try a cheap 450 at Hobbyking before investing to much.

 

Oh, this involves technology, but its outside and not behind a computer.

 

How do i add a youtube movie to this message ?

greetings

Edited by the incredible smoker
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i used to practice kung fu, but takes too much time, and I find that if I dont dedicate 100% to it its kind pointless, kung fu is all about going super sayan if you get what I mean

 

Yes, martial arts are great but require lots of patience and dedication.  I studied Aikido (Stephen Segal) for years before my instructor moved.  I was surprised that most of the people in the dojo were computer people.  I met a lot of great people.

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I used to be a snowboard bum.. I had a real good balance between computers and real life then. but then I had a back injury so I haven't been able to snowboard for about 3 years now. I had surgery in January a year ago and still have some hope that I might get back to it.. The last years I've been stuck too much in front of the computer, but I broke up with my ex, sold the apartment and bought a cheap sailboat in July so things are getting better. Since that I've been working hard on refurbishing it to a level where I now can move into it. Now I can live cheaply, go sailing, work on the boat, work on my hobby project and get some better balance in life.. One day I'll be cruising the world in my boat and making games. :) I'm also getting back into yoga now. :) Its really important for me to have a life away from technology as well. It makes me more productive when I do sit down.

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So I decided to find some kind of hobby that doesn't involve technology.

 

I have to admit (to be honest, not to criticize you or get into a flame war), that sort of thing has always bothered me. I mean, if you were like Lebron James, a guy who played basketball, and football when basketball season was over, and ran track, and would spend all day riding his bike to different parks to find good players to compete against, it would never occur to you "I need to find a hobby that involves more... technology." And yet so many people come to the conclusion that they not only can use too much technology, but they should avoid this fate at all costs.

 

I play basketball as a hobby. A team sport like that is great for a programmers, who are typically not into being in large groups and communicating nonstop. You can't even play basketball if you don't have the confidence to walk up to a group of 4-8 total strangers and ask to play with them. You definitely can't play if you're not going to defend yourself when someone says you're bad at it. It happens to everyone all the time. It's a good social-anxiety-killer.

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I enjoy programming too, yet it is my profession. Those two are excluding sets.

 

As for my hobby - at one point in my life I decided to start bodybuilding, since then I ride bike a lot (yet I gotta find more time to train). Also tennis and football (from time to time), although I'm having hard time to make time for this. So generally, sports.

 

Apart from that, probably cooking, cats, dogs (or basically anything living that is smarter than any living human), and tons of crazy stuff. 

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My brother has a really good time working with wood (I'm not very good at it though, but I like it).

These days, with tools so cheap, it isn't that expensive to get started either, and it can

be relaxing or challenging depending on the type of projects you choose.

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I am a total programming freak, but my big hobby I still do not have time to do is visiting strange nature sights with camera to inspire me. I mean strange ones! rifts and chasms with unseen flora on its steep walls, pathways to hell caves, and also castle ruins.  I have all this in slovakia luckily.

 

But for now, if I do not program, I am getting myself drunk, do clubing, and I also got me 2 American Audio gramophones, yet I am missing mix and the LPs and disturbance speakers. And one other thing that interests me to larger extent is history, since you cannot compute out any knowledge in it- so knowledge in history is much more difficult to gain and prove to be correct. There are few unexplainable topics in history:  Joan of Arc, st Peter burial place (outlaw buried in middle of rome at sacred place ) and so on...

And I am also interested in paranormal phenomena of psychotronics

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Tennis. Lots of tennis. It taps into the same depths of knowledge (and, if you like, perfectionism) as programming, in a way.
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Board games and cards! - nearly as addictive as cyberspace entertainment. As for daily routine I always find walks a great way to relax, clear the mind and refresh after a long day. I've been trying to get into reading regularly but this seem not to work well with freshly downloaded new episodes of fav tv series ;)

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I have a woodworking shop in the basement where I build things like furniture, toys, tools, etc. 

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I do hobby programming projects.  I write C and PHP code all day on the job.  Most of my home projects were C, but I'm currently learning Pascal for no good reason.  Just to be different I guess.

 

I do electronics for a hobby.  LEDs, transistors, etc.  When you add a microcontroller, its just programming again, but circuit design and soldering are a nice break in between writing code.

 

I'm also a licensed ham radio operator.  It's technology again, but mostly analog.  Even without a license (you only need it to transmit), there's a lot of stuff you can do on the receiver end.  I've build single-transistor AM, and believe it or not, single transistor lo-fi FM receivers.

 

And there's photography.  Of course, digital photography leaves you sitting at the computer again editing photos.  You can't escape tech!  Which is why I also have a 35mm SLR.  I use it sparingly since film is do damn expensive.  My latest camera is a 35mm Olympus point and shoot I got at a thrift store for 75 cents!  I also sometimes print out high-contrast paper negatives of some of my digital photos, and go make a sunprint on cyanotype paper.  Or attach 1920's and 1950's lenses to my digital camera.

 

And when I really want to escape tech, I've gone camping. 

 

And I'm married, and my latest 'hobby' is a 1 year old.

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And I'm married, and my latest 'hobby' is a 1 year old.

 

Those are fun, but if you don't put in enough time leveling them up there will be trouble.  The first time my daughter learned to open the fridge she ate a whole jar of pickles.  Good times...

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I spend a lot of time on music (guitar mostly nowadays) and photography/videography. Of course both of these things get sucked right back into computing in the end, but they are still very different experiences overall and I find that they're both valuable to me. The photo/video stuff feeds heavily into my game development work too.

Edited by Promit
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Playing the piano is a nice way to clear the mind. Other than that, no, I don't do anything else, but I don't consider that to be a bad thing. After all, being extremely focused on one particular thing is the strength of a geek, and is what enables us to do what we do.

Edited by TheComet
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Not every hobby I have involves a computer, but a good chunk do!

Non-computer hobbies:

Playing Magic
Playing Guitar/Piano

Reading

Writing short stories (ok, arguably that's mostly done on a computer, but a lot of my writing I do inside of notebooks first, then transfer over)

Photography (again, editing/uploading is done in a computer, but the initial shooting is the most enjoyable part for me)
Videography (see above parenthesis ^^^)

 

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Seems like music is a big one.  I know a lot of programmers who are also good musicians.  It must be the way our brains are wired.

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I took up photography a few years ago. It has been very satisfying (and quite a money sink as well).

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presently i got none other than programming (except online-chat talking) though maybe i should stop a bit cause im often feelin bad, in the summer i was usually biking but this also started to bore me, and now im feeling lost

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weightlifting/fitness training

 

mainly to fight back against the side effects of sitting in front of a machine for hours each day

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I dont get how can knowing to play a musical instrument be way more common than knowing how to draw.

 

Every children will have access to pen and paper, everyone knows how a pencil works.

Now to play an instrument, theres so many complexities involved, and its so not intuitive to convert what you hear to figuring out how to reproduce on the instrument.

 

Now if you fart on a corner, 60% of the ppl who will smell it will know how to play an instrument, and 2% know how to draw. At least on my personal experience is how I perceive.

 

How can that be?

Edited by Icebone1000
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