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Jezzman

Just wanna ask some advice for beginnners

8 posts in this topic

Hi everyone!

This is the third time I have to write down this message. I'm gonna try and keep it shorter this time.

I love gaming and recently I've decided to at least TRY to make a game from start to finish.
I've already looked up some info and these are my conclusions. I would like to ask your opinion about this.

KEEP IN MIND, I'm starting from scratch. I don't know any coding/programming lingo. I'm not an IT-expert that has dabbled with computers all his life. I just love games.

1) Game development has 4 phases: Planning (thinking ahead about the game and all it's details), Prototyping (making low rez prototypes to test core gameplay and mechanics), Developing (Making the game and looking up the needed materials like soundclips, libraries, assets...) and Releasing (Listening to feedback and using it accordingly).

2) I should learn a programming language. I chose for C#. I heared good things about it and C++ seems a definitive nope.

I found a free book to learn this from ( http://www.robmiles.com/c-yellow-book/ ). I printed out the first 3 chapters and I'll guess I'll just start cramping this info into my brain.
Microsoft seems to have a pretty large database as well ( http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vstudio/hh341490 )

Is this a good idea and are these tools enough to learn? If you got other suggestions, I'll be happy to hear them.

3) Working yourself up the ladder: I wanted to make 3D games, but as a beginner it seems that would be a bit out of my league. I found a list of gametypes, ranking from simple to complex in 2D.
I don't feel like typing it all in here again so I'll just provide the link which also explains why working you're way up this way is the good way to go. ( http://www.gamefromscratch.com/post/2013/08/01/Just-starting-out-what-games-should-I-make.aspx )

Can anyone agree with this? Or if you have tips on how you would do it/did it, let me know!

4) Choosing an engine: If making 3D games, Unity or (afterwards) UDK is the way to go.
If making 2D games, which will be my case, also Unity could be used, but there's also GameMaker and LÖVE (a rather new one)
As it stands, I would probably try my luck with LÖVE because it's new, it seems to have a decent community and there's no watermark.

Anyone got experience with this engine or any other suggestions?

5) Libraries: I also looked up some info about what libraries to use, but I feel that would be going in too deep for now. Therefore I won't add them to this post.


There, I think that's enough for one sitting. This is the course I charted for the moment.
If anyone disagrees or sees ways to improve this plan, I'd be happy to hear them.
General newcomertips are also welcome. Wish me luck! :)

Kind Regards,                Jezzman

 

(Edit: If there are any major steps or components that I'm not thinking about/don't know about yet, don't hesitate to add them in your reply!)

Edited by Jezzman
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Great replies so far, thanks a lot! I'll just start out with setting small goals and learning a bit about basic C# language. Other than that I might give this GameMaker a try.

 

 

Thanks for adding that article, I'll be sure to give it a read!

Edited by Jezzman
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Yeah, the development process isn't that clear cut. Every person interprets it different. In fact I know some who combine the development and prototype stages into just the development stage because they prototype ideas as they develop the game. In terms of stages just do what comes natural to you and code it, but it will take some time if you don't know how to code, but believe me there is no greater sense of accomplishment than seeing your idea come to life.

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1) its the basic idea plus a testing stage. More you plan out ahead the easier time you will have at programming your game.

 

2) Pick a language, seriously just pick one. Learning the language is gonna be the easiest part of game making. If the particular language ends up not being right for what you need you can always change to another.  Everything you learn in one language will be applicable to another. If you end up programing for any length of time you end up learning a few other one anyways.

 

3) Yup great idea start off with some simple games first till you get the hang of some of the basics. Each game should be a challenge to build and teach you something new.

 

5) libraries? You'll be using them. They are there to simplify things but there's tons of choices out there. They are there so you dont have to reinvent the wheel. Learn to use them

 

4) Game engines could say they are a collection of libraries with there own editors ... There's quite a few game engines out there at this point I would just keep an eye out for a few see how there developing.One of the issue you will run into if you jump straight into trying to use a game engine is it'll be easy to get overwhelmed.

 

pick a language, start learning it, just use a text editor and compiler to start off with till you under stand some basics, pick up an ide, figure out what source/version control is ...

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I've picked up RPG Maker VX Ace today! I'm going to mess around with that a little, see if it's any good for me.

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Cool, RPG Maker is a nice (fun) way to play around with game design, without having to worry about the programming side.

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