• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
ossaltu

Engine for huge strategic map - some architectural dilemas

4 posts in this topic

Recently we have formed a team and started developing a strategic game. We all are in IT industry for some time but it is first time when we are developing a game. The reason I am writing this post is that we want to hear an opinion about architectural decisions we have made from people who are game industry professionals.

First I give a screenshot so it would be easier to understand what I’ll be talking about: https://skydrive.live.com/?cid=AC26DC9D4B0CE3E5&id=AC26DC9D4B0CE3E5%212005&v=3

 

Basically we to develop a huge hexagon based map which would contain cities, roads, woods, etc.

 

This is how we have approached the problem till now: we have divided the whole map into regions (currently 20x20 tiles). Each region is represented by region object. We have used quad trees to determine which regions are on screen at the moment. If the region gets to screen for the first time, it gets loaded asynchronously – terrain geometry is generated based on map tiles (we have decided not to save terrain geometry on disk because it would take a lot of space), roads, territory markers are generated and everything is placed to region object including vertex buffers and other data needed to latter render the region.

 

Whole generation of objects is done by updater objects, which get regions passed, do the generating stuff and places generated data on region.

 

When something changes in map, e.g. new city is added, updaters get regions passed which are involved in update, generate data with changes and places it to region object.

 

There is a set of renderers, which get list of regions to render and draws them on screen based on data placed in region objects.

 

So, my questions are: is this similar to the techniques game developers approach that kind of problems? If not, then how usually people approach them? Are there any flows you may notice in such design?

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't see why this is posted in coding horrors, I'll assume it's a mistake and get moved.

 

That sounds mostly fine, though do you ever unload regions once they've been loaded?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This is how i used i. My current eninge terrain. Quad tree for decide which tiles to draw on screen. Divided large map into regions, so we can update things change every frame. But only the part that changed not the whole map
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the feedback.

 

That sounds mostly fine, though do you ever unload regions once they've been loaded?

 

Yes, regions are unloaded after some time off-screen, or when region limit is reached.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You may have to split your data between strategic simulation factors (to keep in memory and continue the simulation) and the remaining area details (which can roll out of memory).

 

Alternatives (depending on your game mechanics and area interdependancies)  is to have the area 'development' prorated and run-forward on reloading into memory.   Even with the split data mentioned above, updating the detailed data on reload can be done.    

 

If you have 'units' which cross between area boundries, then you also have to deal with the transition between the 'realized' (in-memory) units to their 'abstract' (rolled out area) form.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0