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Nick of ZA

Voice Command Recognition: State of the art?

2 posts in this topic

gamedev.net is littered with old, brief and fruitless discussions of voice recognition.
 
What is the state of this art, now? Over the last decade, what games have had reliable voice/speech recognition in terms of issuing generic commands, rather than being able to identify individual speakers? I will begin with a list of games and middleware that I know of...
 
Public spreadsheet listing different games and middleware. Feel free to add smile.png or post responses here.
 
Also there is this table for Fonix and ScanSoft middleware, which seem to be major industry players(?).
 
I'd value experiences shared by British English and North American English speakers, others would be a bonus such as non-native speaker European and Asian accents. If you don't mind, state which you fall under when sharing your experiences as I'd like to know how different middleware works for various regional accents.
 
Cheers.
Edited by NickWiggill
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I found (like 10 years ago) playing with the MS Speech SDK that individual command words worked fairly well (limited vocabulary) when just random speech recognition had something like a 25% failure rate (I repeated text heard on a TV show in their trasncription sample program and wasnt pleased with how many wrong words were processed).

 

I recall the CPU usage at that time was 200m instructions  per second of the available CPU (was a single core)

 

If we ever want games with more command options, something like this will be needed (as well as issuing short sentence commands to lakeys instead of endless use of menu trees)

 

Working out input seperation between interplayer communications might not be horrible (a mic button ?)

 

I hope that the random text transliteration is also better now, as I miss open communications in MMORPGs (like UO, with text over the avatars head instead of the distraction/crudity of a chat box) and the bandwidth issue (seeing 100 conversations at once - and  now getting rid of the limitation of only being able to play or talk but not both at the same time). 

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Thanks, @wodinoneeye.

 

The one thing that bothers me even more than a few missed words is the mic button. I really dislike the concept, though it's necessary for unobscured recognition and is, anyway, a staple in multiplayer gaming. One more hand / finger that has to be free to press one more button seems far from ideal... that's a big part of why I want to implement voice recognition, to avoid having to remember tons of keys and key combos.

 

Given that there's no other practical way (that I know of) for clear recognition, I'd rather make that sacrifice and not have to deal with menu trees which are a UI abomination... or at least do so only as a fallback measure.

Edited by NickWiggill
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