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Do game designers need to use the computer to work?

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My parents complain that I use too much of the comp and play games too much. I only play games for only about 2-3 hrs max per day but I use the comp a lot because I need to use it for not only my college works but also for my future career. So I want to know if for being a game designer, do you need to spend a lot of time in the computer making assets for video games or something? Or better yet, does a game designer really need to spend hours in the computer working?

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Hi.

 

First of all, I will presume you are talking about video game design.

 

Well, you don't have to design on the computer, you could use pen and paper to write down ideas, concepts and designs etc. There are even some advantages to not use the computer at early stages of design, such as having a more rapid, less constrained design-process.

 

There is however a time when you will have to start using the computer to prototype and tests these ideas, because it is, after all, the computer (or a concole / hand held device) that is the targeted paltform.

Edited by AlanSmithee
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My parents complain that I use too much of the comp and play games too much.

 

Show them what you're doing.  But that still might not stop their complaints. If I had a kid who was always at the computer, I'd complain too.  After you move out on your own, you can sit at the computer all you want, and of course they'll still nosily ask, "are you still sitting at the computer all the time? It's not good for you!" They're just being parents.

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My parents complain that I use too much of the comp and play games too much. I only play games for only about 2-3 hrs max per day but I use the comp a lot because I need to use it for not only my college works but also for my future career. So I want to know if for being a game designer, do you need to spend a lot of time in the computer making assets for video games or something? Or better yet, does a game designer really need to spend hours in the computer working?

In a word, yes. Plus side is that as a game designer or programmer you also have to play games, as a designer you have to look at it and see what works and what doesn't (also reading fan sites and seeing what they like and hate about the games helps), as a programmer you have to think of it in a way of 'how did they do that?' and then start trying to imitate it then try ways to add onto it by experimenting with it. Kind of hard to be in games at all without a computer.

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Only 2 - 3 hours? Personally that seems like a lot to me (but I don't know what your friends are like...)

 

If you want to minimize your time at the magic box, try doing more design work on paper.

 

And if you have a laptop, you might consider doing some work outside, or by a beach or pool...just to minimize the gloomy-ness of working at a screen inside.

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Depends on how you use that time for.  IMO, a game designer should spend their time dissecting games, not just playing them.

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Just show them the productive work you've done and it will help the situtation. I honestly don't think it matters if you spend your leisure time on the computer so long as you've been productive with you day.

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Only 2 - 3 hours? Personally that seems like a lot to me (but I don't know what your friends are like...)

 

Now that I'm a professional developer in the day job, I try to manage average around 2-3 hours of game a day - I capitalise on the weekends of course, but I still play almost daily. When I was at school, 2-3 hours a day was easy since I'd be getting home at 4pm, rather than 7pm ;)

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Yes and No.  There is a lot of time spent in front of a computer but also just as much time set in loooooong meetings.  And a lot of time with a good old fashioned pad and pen.

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Except you can use maya/blender and unreal/unity on your phone then yes, you do need a computer because you have to program the game or model the assets.
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There's a lot of time spent WORKING on the computer. Playing games is often done on your own time, but you probably need to do this to stay on top of things.

 

Playing games for 3 hours a night (if that's all you're doing) isn't helping you learn to be a game designer because it's such a small part of the job.

 

When I was in high school I definitely played games 2 hours a night on average. I don't think I even get in 2 hours a month these days.

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Except you can use maya/blender and unreal/unity on your phone then yes, you do need a computer because you have to program the game or model the assets.

 

I actually have written code in the drop box app a few times, not the easiest experience, but it works when you need to get something done quick!

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