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AhmedCoeia

Keep getting rejected by interviewers

18 posts in this topic

I got about 7 interviews in the last two years, face to face, and I got rejected. They never say a reason, even they never tested me technically, they just asking general questions, HR, and if you have skills in this or this and mostly I do.

I'm really wondering, and that's really depressing, should I leave the country or what for a better IT Job industry like UK, ireland ?

I would like to know what could be the reason for having that common behavior.

Most of the jobs that I apply for are junior to middle career, so I have never requested something that is high in responsibility. I'm an EE graduated in 2007, and mostly I worked for Computer Vision, Games and Embedded Software, Security..etc.

Some of the replies:

1) We can not provide you with a positive response, but we wish you the best for your future career.

2) Thanks for the follow-up, I am very late at catching up with applications in the new year. I value your engagement in keeping interested in our job offer. We’ve decided on another candidate this time but will happily consider your application in the future.

3) it’s our personal impression that you will not fit into our existing design team. Additionally we missed important personal properties. In our team everyone enigneer has to rely on each other team member. Personally I would not rely on the results of your statements or work.

4) This one after really promising with a job offer, they sent that after 4 months of the interview. Dear Mr, we would like to thank you for your interest. We are sorry to let you know that our company does not have any vacancy at the moment. We do however retain your details in our files which we periodically review when considering potential candidates for other vacancies. "

After getting suggestions by editing the question My question is it normal that you have about 8 job interviews and you only get offer by two ? What is the acceptable ejection ratio?

 
Edited by AhmedCoeia
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1. is it normal that you have about 8 job interviews and you only get offer by two ?

2. What is the acceptable ejection ratio?

 

1. No, it's not normal to get that high a percentage of offers.  Most people will have many interviews before they get one offer.

 

2. [shrug]

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I got about 7 interviews in the last two years, face to face, and I got rejected.
is it normal that you have about 8 job interviews and you only get offer by two ?

I'm not quite sure how to read that.

In one statement you mention getting 8 job interviews and two job offers. That seems like a good thing with the two job offers part. That's two job offers. Take one.



But the other part of it...

7 total interviews in two years.

How many jobs did you apply for? If you REALLY wanted that job and were qualified for it, over the course of two years you could have become close friends with many people on the development team at a specific studio and gained the job through personal contact. Over two years you could likely have become very familiar with the HR people at all the major studios globally. You could have gone to school for and advanced degree, or done quite a lot of other things if you were applying yourself.

If you were really working hard at getting the job and only had 7 interviews after what, many hundred job applications(?) that should be a sign of something too. Or if you didn't do anything serious to try and get the job, that should be a sign on a different direction.
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8 is not too big, fuck them, you do not said to much or nothing

about your coding skills and experience (get some skills and do not want to much money, and you will be accepted' no to much philosophy here (though i get know some goofy recuiting people they was inviting a lot of people just for the sake 'we will see were bored', many of the candidates were okay but they not accepted anybody with no reason - of course it was bad becouse many people was travelling a lot and do not even get a cup of tea))

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Thanks so much for your input.

 

The guy with commenting of coding skills asked me very stupid java question, like iterator that points to an iterator of a list. He wanted to reverse that list. I simply told him, put all the list in the stack and reverse it, and get an iterator, he stopped for a second, then he said, no I want that method. STUPID.

 

The thing that I really wanna know what's the problem, I speak good, answer their HR questions, but at the end they send that rejection letter.  80% of the interviews, there were no technical interview at all, and that's common in Austria, because you stay a one month trial period, followed by two months fixed term contract.

 

I'm gonna get mad:(

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@Tom 

Thanks for your reply. So You mean you can get 10 interviews and only get two offers ? I meant get rejected by 10 interviews not get 10 offers.

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In my own experience, I think about 40% of applications I send out (for open positions they're soliciting to fill, not including "we're always hiring! Send us your resume!" situations) turn into phone-screens or in-person interviews, and of those about 40% have made some kind of offer. So that's a little less than 2 out of 10 applications end up in an offer. Of the offers, about a third offered unacceptable terms (low pay, or some indication of unacceptable-to-me work-life balance), or occasionally I've had multiple offers in the same time window, and had to reject the weaker offer.

 

All in all, I'd say that's about 1 in 15 applications that has become a job.

 

Of course, you'll see more or less action depending on how well-qualified you actually are for the positions you're applying for, how well your resume presents you and your skills, how the interviewer perceives your personality traits, and how low a wage you might be willing to accept.

 

All that said, rightly or wrongly, usually the bar to hire a foreigner living in another country is higher than for a native (or someone with a similar cultural background), even if they've been naturalized. Its simply that all things being equal, someone of one background fits more easily into a team that's predominantly of a similar background. As a foreigner, you simply have a harder time convincing them of your worth. Often, engineering practices differ by company and by team, and new necessary skills can be taught, so you do not win a job on your technical merits alone; the so-called "team fit" and aptitude for learning and problem solving are usually all that an interviewer is actually weighting after an interview (In general you don't get an interview unless they think you've got the technical skills, and any technical questions during an interview are there to gut-check that you didn't lie about your skills, and to watch you problem-solve). If you don't get technical questions during an interview, they either believe you have the skills you say you have, or (perhaps more likely) they choose to evaluate team-fit first, and they're passing over you before getting to that part.

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Thanks Ravyne.

 

I got the following feedback from the last interview at anitvirus company, I really do not know what to reply to him, so that I open new branches

 

 

I’d like to thank you for the application.

We actually favored another job seeker who fitted better into the team in terms of qualification and previous knowledge in some very specific domains.

 

I’ll have you in mind when we look for a new position in the near future.

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Thanks Ravyne.

 

I got the following feedback from the last interview at anitvirus company, I really do not know what to reply to him, so that I open new branches

 

 

I’d like to thank you for the application.

We actually favored another job seeker who fitted better into the team in terms of qualification and previous knowledge in some very specific domains.

 

I’ll have you in mind when we look for a new position in the near future.

 

You can either not reply, or say simply, "okay, thanks."

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it’s our personal impression that you will not fit into our existing design team. Additionally we missed important personal properties. In our team everyone enigneer has to rely on each other team member. Personally I would not rely on the results of your statements or work.

 

Ouch. That's rather telling, because it's unusual for you to get such negative responses - they normally don't like to give negative feedback.

 

Why don't you try and do some practice interviews and get feedback?

 

Also, calling people stupid isn't a great approach. An interview is as much about making the interviewer happy as it is about actually showing how good you are. Many interviewers like to feel good about how great an interviewer they are, how smart their silly questions are, etc.

Edited by d000hg
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it’s our personal impression that you will not fit into our existing design team. Additionally we missed important personal properties. In our team everyone enigneer has to rely on each other team member. Personally I would not rely on the results of your statements or work.

 

Ouch. That's rather telling, because it's unusual for you to get such negative responses - they normally don't like to give negative feedback.

 

Why don't you try and do some practice interviews and get feedback?

 

Also, calling people stupid isn't a great approach. An interview is as much about making the interviewer happy as it is about actually showing how good you are. Many interviewers like to feel good about how great an interviewer they are, how smart their silly questions are, etc.

 

 

I mostly agree -- especially that negative feedback indicates that you made a really bad impression.

 

However, I think it is disingenuous to suggest that the interviewer is effectively trying to get an ego boost. I know that I probably ask stupid questions in an interview. Things that are impractical or unreasonable in the ~30 minutes I get with a candidate. The truth is, I don't really care that much about their final answer and I don't have time to fuck around. I just want to prompt a conversation that isn't simply a canned response. In an in-person interview, I already have a good idea that they are qualified and I just want to figure out two things: (1) do their answers in person jive with the phone screen and (2) do I personally want to work with them day after day. If I think you are trying to stroke my ego, I don't want to work with you. If you are abrasive, a jerk, or uncooperative in an interview (when you should be showing your best side), I don't want to work with you. If you don't get the "right" answer but are communicating your ideas and moving towards a reasonable solution, I can work with you.

 

pro-tip: never mention that you pirate software in an interview :wacko:

 

-Josh

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It's not true in all cases, but generally your job in an interviewer is to make the interviewer want to hire you. Sometimes that doesn't mean parading your amazingness in front of him. Cynical but true. Interviewers might not be AFTER an ego boost, but making them feel like you're smart and you think they're smart can't hurt, being thought well of by someone you think is smart is a great feeling :)

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Thanks Ravyne.

 

I got the following feedback from the last interview at anitvirus company, I really do not know what to reply to him, so that I open new branches

 

 

I’d like to thank you for the application.

We actually favored another job seeker who fitted better into the team in terms of qualification and previous knowledge in some very specific domains.

 

I’ll have you in mind when we look for a new position in the near future.

 

Because of the way its worded, I actually think there's an opportunity to continue to build a favorable impression with a simple response. Something along the lines of "Thanks again for having me in for an interview. I came away impressed with your company culture, and would be excited to be considered for future openings that match my skills."

 

That's all the more it needs to be. To be too long-winded, or appear overly excited in your response could very easily work against you, and torpedo your chances at being asked back. I would only encourage you to respond in this case because the precise way its worded sounds to me at face value that they actually do have a specific opening coming soon, and that the interviewer actually will consider you for it. But there's always the possibility that they're being overly pleasant, or the even more remote possibility that they've actively decided not to seriously consider you for future positions, and they think telling you that you will be considered is the quickest way to make you go away. You should honestly know whether that outside chance is the reality or not, and if it is, you should seriously examine what it is about you that might be irritating people.

 

In the general case of a "Thanks, but no thanks." response, its not necessary to respond, and it usually will only work against you if you do -- If you've solicited for feedback or followed up after the interview, you should already have thanked them for the interview and there should be nothing more that needs to be said -- thus, continuing on is just distracting a busy professional and dragging out a long process that no one enjoys (that is, filling an open position -- which is time-consuming, boring, and tedious) and they aren't going to think of you any better for that.

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Have you read any books on interviewing? I'd also recommend a book such as How To Instantly Connect With Anyone. You may very well be great at what you do, but unless you're marketing yourself in the proper manor, by "playing the game", you may not get the job. Best of luck.

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