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TheScriptan

Project "Learning Programming In 2 Years"

18 posts in this topic

mine is study in less than a year and learn continuously (c++). I've gone a bit far in less 4months.

Even if c++ is the most powerful language, I know that it's not for me. :)
Yeah. Good Luck :)
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That's a very ambitious project. I'm impressed. If you keep at it and publish your results semi regularly, you'll likely gain at least a small audience. And having an audience can serve as a motivator. Just be sure to ignore the random jerks that might rip into you. They're just jealous.

 

If you didn't know anything about programming, step 1 would be learn how to program. Since it looks like you're the developer behind Moving@, I'm guessing you know at least a little. I'm also impressed that a 15 year old is interested in a rogue like. Most of you young whipper snappers wouldn't be caught dead playing something so "primitive". Back in my day, we didn't have graphics! *shakes cane*

 

Here is a great article for starting out. I can't recommend it enough:
 
Set small, reasonable goals for yourself or you'll quickly get overwhelmed. The above guide has a breakdown of which projects you should tackle first and why. I wouldn't start "your game" until you've completed a few of these first.
 
And the beginner FAQ is also an excellent place to start:
 
One of the biggest hurdles is dedicating time to learning. You have to choose to do it. You don't always have to choose programming over other things. But if you never choose programming, you'll never get better.

 

Future-you (the you that is living in the future) will greatly appreciate these efforts. If the project is successful, it could prove to be a tool in getting a professional development job. Or even a professional game development job! And even if the project isn't that successful, you can at least look back and see how far you've grown as a programmer.

 

Future-you will also get a chuckle out of the statement "When I was young." ;)

 

Good luck to you sir. Keep us posted, and when you run into some stumbling blocks, feel free to ask for help here.

 

- Eck

Hi, thank you very much for this post, I will write down some words, because they are so inspiring! ^^ Anyways I like roguelikes, because back in my old pc days, I didnt have anything to play, but then I found roguelikes, I found a big beauty. It was like playing an exclusive game for me, and that's how I got into roguelike development. smile.png It would be really good if I am going to be succesfull with this, because I read a tip that says "Programmers are good communicators", when you communicate with users you can make the best program/game. smile.png

 

By the way a new blogpost is coming about my first day at this project. :)

Edited by TheScriptan
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First timelapse y'all, it was done using Ubuntu and gLapse + VirtualDub, and DropBox transfering screenshots. :D

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Good luck with your project!

 

I am 15 years old.

 

When I was young I wasn't even thinking about programming,

 

You are still young tongue.png

 

This is the closest I've been to feeling old, ever.

I wanted to say younger, but it's not a problem :) Hey join my livestream and follow my progress up my way to programming once more! :) http://www.twitch.tv/thescriptan

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TheScriptan, good luck with your project. I think it sounds truly interesting and from time to time I will definitely jump on twitch to see what is going on. I'm following you on twitter too. Also, you definitely are young still, but I started programming when I was about 13 years old (learning BASIC was required in 7th/8th grades, I was hooked since). You are already on the right track, ignoring people that tell you to learn a language and instead learn the languages you want to learn. I look forward to seeing what you do in the future. Truly, good luck with it. 

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I learned it in under a year. It is not as hard as I thought it was, it is just hard to find good information. So I made a tutorial about the key principles after I had learned, to help people get into it faster:

 

http://snapguide.com/guides/understand-computer-programming/

 

as for C++ (which you might want to learn simply because so many people require you know it in the industry) this is the most informational, easy to understand, consistent video series I have seen, by krashcourse101:

 

http://www.youtube.com/user/krashcourse101

 

I have used Codecademy also, and someone just recommended some other site to me:

http://www.codecademy.com/dashboard

 

I also use my iPad and several apps to help me practice:

-Codea (program in LUA)

-Pythonista (program in Python)

-Textastic (basic IDE with syntax highlighting)

 

There is also a good video series on the Ruby Programming language on iTunes U (for IOS if you have it) called "Introduction to Programming with Ruby" by Mark Sobkowicz

 

If you don't understand the terminology I used above, my tutorial should help you. 

Edited by Tutorial Doctor
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A comment about C++

I used to hate C++'s ugly face with a passion, but after watching a few videos, I saw just how neat and useful it is. I also saw how powerful it was (more control over the stuff that happens). And yes, C++ is fast, because of the way it does things more so than if it can do the those things or not.

I saw that the main issue I had with watching most videos or reading most tutorials on C++ was that the way people wrote their code was in a way that was not logical to me, yet they hardly explain their reason for doing things, so it might have made sense then.

I like to understand the HOW and the WHY. I think both parts are crucial to understanding this subject.

For instance, why do they do that whole :

public static void main()

thing?

C++ is a little more descriptive of its functions, so this just means that this particular function is a public function, that it is static, and that it is void (returns nothing after it does what it does) and that it is the main function. A main function is the function that runs all other functions. Simple stuff like that helped me to understand the otherwise thought "stupid" syntax of C++. Even their variables have description.

Another thing that got me were the shortcuts people used. This is the reason I found it hard to find good Blender 3D tutorials. People just whacked keys assuming we knew what they were pressing.

So don't just learn the language, learn the shortcuts (if only to be able to follow tutorials or code you see).
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I think this is fantastic.  It sounds like you're doing it right - just focus on learning first.  Don't be afraid to throw away a first try and restart with a better paradigm.  Some (realistic) ambition is good, but don't rush things too much by setting difficult goals, it'll just risk frustration.  And most of all - keep it fun.

 

In my experience the best developers learned just like this - on their own, and on their own time.  (Rather than in schools or at a job... not to say these can't help.)

 

Two years should be more than enough time, I'm sure you'll catch on if you stick with it.  I'm a little jealous you have the help of the Internet - I was doing this out of the old paperback books to start off!!!  laugh.png

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it is void (does nothing)

Just to nit-pick a bit -- a void function does not mean the function [b]does[/b] nothing. It means the function does not [b]return[/b] anything (valid).

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it is void (does nothing)

Just to nit-pick a bit -- a void function does not mean the function does nothing. It means the function does not return anything (valid).

Yes, my bad, good. Haha.
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Reminds me of myself :D 

I've been programming since around 12-13, now I'm 16, I totally agree with how you decided to take a break and wait till you got a bit older so you could understand some of the concepts. I experienced the same issues in the beginning but now I understand everything! Programming is actually my hobby now! Trust me, learning this stuff at an early age really helps! I was able to skip an entire school year because of how my programming helped my math skills and now programming class is the easiest thing in the world! 

 

I however didn't get straight into game development, I've been switching through multiple things like computer security, game dev, math, simulation, assembly, OS dev...

 

Basically, I don't regret having spent the last few years programming, it has really paid off and just as Eck said, it has certainly influenced my career choice. At one point I used to say I wanted to be a quantum scientist (I didn't even know how hard that would be) but now I can't even think of anything but computer engineering. My dream has changed from making my own discovery to having my own game studio!

 

Taking the time to learn these things when (I'd say) the brain learns/adapts fastest, is really going to pay off for you if you keep up the work! Don't worry if you don't finish a project, I have about a few GB of projects which I haven't finished but it's the effort that counts!

 

I really hope you finish this undertaking though  ;) 

My main programming language is C# (I sometimes even think in it! xD ) so if you have any questions, just ask  ;)  

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Hello everyone! I am really sorry that I abandoned this project, I don't know what was I thinking, the beggining was so succefull! Anyways I am going to revive this project! At this moment I am learning Lua/Love2D, so far I am doing pretty good, well I started only three days ago, but still I have a lot of fun! If you want to come and help me out a little bit, not only with the code, but with the game designing and ideas, so come here!

http://www.twitch.tv/thescriptan

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