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Scooerfebb

Making a new game?

8 posts in this topic

Hello,

I am not sure if this is the right place to be posting this... Sorry in advance I am new to this forum.

Me and a few friends have come up with a great game concept. However, we have no clue where to start. The game we want to build is extremely complex and is a over all huge game. We are not planning on doing this on our own. We are planning on hiring people to work for us and help make the game.

The general concept of the game is a life simulation that is based off of the sims platform but is more interactive. For example you are in first person and have to interact with your persons career path constantly. You must also drive vehicles through a large diverse world. A stretch goal of ours is to make it online however we don't know how to go about that.

We understand that we need a plan and need to outline the game in detail. We just don't know where to start.

The other problem is that if we have done any of our planning so far correct, it is going to cost a lot of money in software, equipment, and most important talent.

As far as software goes we would like to use unigine as our engine. Also using 3ds max and zbrush for our modeling. We would like to use BBEdit for coding and reason 7 for sound. Is this good software for a 3D game?

Equipment wise we would like to go all apple. Is this the way to go or should me go windows?

As far as hired help would go, we figured around 50 people in development along. Does this seem like to many or maybe not enough? Also what other forms of staff do we need other than development as far as testing goes? I think we have the design down for now...

We are also in search of financial backing as kinda mentioned above. We are planning on going on kickstarter. But before we get ahead of our selves we just want to see what the process is like. We all have a background in management and really think we can handle building this game.

Any information or words of advice you may have would be great.

Just to let you know we all have a general understanding of C++, C#, Java, and Python. However none of us are absolutely fluent.

Thanks,
-Ben
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If the sound advice of SeanMiddleditch and Hodgman didn't sink in, take a look at TomSloper's site and read the numerous FAQ's.

http://www.sloperama.com/advice.html

 

Also, not to poo-poo your game idea, but from the brief description I heard, it sounds like it's a game about driving to work, and working. If people weren't getting enough of that in their lives, wouldn't they pick up a second job? :) I had too much of it myself and so I demanded full time work from home. And got it... /breakdance

 

- Eck

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Ideas are a dime a dozen. Execution and proven talent is what gets people on board, not ideas. Likewise for acquiring the money to hire people.

 

I echo that.

There is talent for ideas, however it is overshadowed by the talent for execution of ideas. Substantial, objective work is more telling than abstract, mental language thought processes.

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Unless you know what the process is like, it is important to limit the size and complexity of your project. You also need to know how fast your team could build things and how they work. Can your team work well and understand each other?

 

Tip: Design will always change so build prototypes of your idea and improve off of that. 

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As far as hired help would go, we figured around 50 people in development along. Does this seem like to many or maybe not enough? Also what other forms of staff do we need other than development as far as testing goes? I think we have the design down for now...

 

So, you and your friends are going to be the bosses of these 50 people, right?

 

How are you going to answer their questions when they look to you for leadership? No offense to gamedev.net, but if you have to post to some online forum to check if what you are doing makes sense, you are not suited to take responsibility for the careers of 50 people.

 

Maybe, if you can somehow pull together the money to fund this project (anybody can have rich friends/family I suppose), at least have the decency to let whichever leaders you hire decide on what development tools to use, instead of proscribing what your team must use, when you do not know how to make those decisions yourself.

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