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EdinsonC

Hello

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Hello people, the name's Edinson and I am 18 years old, I am a computer science major, but have yet to start CS course, I live in Brooklyn, NY and am aspiring to become an Indie Video Game Developer.

 

...Anyway now that the introduction is out of the way I'd like a little advise on how to start out; I am a novice at all this. I'm currently coming up with ideas for games and jotting them all down. I know not to aim too high (like an AAA type of game). So far I've been developing ideas for a card game which in the long run can become a mobile app and includes multiplayer. I know it might seem a bit far fetched for a beginner but for now i can just work on the story for single player for the game. Also, I've been thinking about making a 2D Top Down Perspective RPG with graphics similar to the classic Final Fantasy games, or classic Pokemon games. I'd like some advice on what programming languages would most likely be best fitted for such games and for me as a beginner. I plan to study the languages and use them to make copies of classic simple games such as Tetris or Pong to familiarize myself with the language well, as it is common for most beginners. Then I plan to jump into working on my own games.

 

...I can't wait to start working on games and learn from others, I will return the favour by returning the good karma and teach others in things I've learned along the way.

 

Thank you for taking your time to read. Awaiting replies biggrin.png

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Welcome to the community!

 

I've hidden your other post, please don't create duplicate posts here. If you feel a post you made belongs elsewhere, bring it to the attention of a moderator.

 

 


I'd like some advice on what programming languages would most likely be best fitted for such games and for me as a beginner. 

Have you read the FAQ?

 

 

Thank you for hiding the other post and now I know. However, how do I contact a mod?

Also, I did read the FAQ which recommended I'd start with Python or C#. I just asked anyway because I thought their might be other languages which might more suitable to my long term goals for my games as I originally mentioned. If these two are truly the best to start of with ill look into them, choose one and get right to it then.

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I just asked anyway because I thought their might be other languages which might more suitable to my long term goals for my games as I originally mentioned.

 

These languages are suitable for your long term goals - though that doesn't mean you will always use them. Languages are just tools - and if you stick with game dev you will likely learn many languages and when to use them for what.

 

C# is great for the app development world and is what a lot of tools that speed up the game dev process use. Python is just really easy to make things quickly. Both languages are fairly high level and forgiving - they make it harder for you to write bad programs (though of course you still easily can).

 

C++ is kind of a hot word- and its because its one of the most powerful and difficult to use effectively. Beginners are often shooed away from it because the development time for games (even using lots of libraries) is usually very long due to the complex nature of the language.

 

Java is similar to C++ though I have found it has a bit less steep learning curve due to its automatic garbage collection and not using pointers.

 

IMO, if your starting game dev because you love programming then go for c++ - you will do a lot of reinventing the wheel and get less extravagant final projects for equal amounts of time you could put in to developing with other languages/tools, but you will understand programming a lot better. It will also make picking up new languages easy - when you love programming learning c++ is very rewarding.

 

If your in it for making the games - ie your more interested in getting your idea for a game produced and working than you are in understanding the details of how the computer is making the game work - then definitely c# or python are good choices. With these languages you will be able to create games much more quickly than with c++ especially if you use tools such as Unity.

 

In the long road - you will likely use and learn different languages depending on the project your working on

Edited by EarthBanana
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I just asked anyway because I thought their might be other languages which might more suitable to my long term goals for my games as I originally mentioned.

 
These languages are suitable for your long term goals - though that doesn't mean you will always use them. Languages are just tools - and if you stick with game dev you will likely learn many languages and when to use them for what.
 
C# is great for the app development world and is what a lot of tools that speed up the game dev process use. Python is just really easy to make things quickly. Both languages are fairly high level and forgiving - they make it harder for you to write bad programs (though of course you still easily can).
 
C++ is kind of a hot word- and its because its one of the most powerful and difficult to use effectively. Beginners are often shooed away from it because the development time for games (even using lots of libraries) is usually very long due to the complex nature of the language.
 
Java is similar to C++ though I have found it has a bit less steep learning curve due to its automatic garbage collection and not using pointers.
 
IMO, if your starting game dev because you love programming then go for c++ - you will do a lot of reinventing the wheel and get less extravagant final projects for equal amounts of time you could put in to developing with other languages/tools, but you will understand programming a lot better. It will also make picking up new languages easy - when you love programming learning c++ is very rewarding.
 
If your in it for making the games - ie your more interested in getting your idea for a game produced and working than you are in understanding the details of how the computer is making the game work - then definitely c# or python are good choices. With these languages you will be able to create games much more quickly than with c++ especially if you use tools such as Unity.
 
In the long road - you will likely use and learn different languages depending on the project your working on


Great answer,very detailed. Thank you for taking the time. I'm in it for the games and less for the programming itself. I plan to start out with Python and see where i go from there; like ypu said iw will most definitely learn other languages. Python kust seems like a fine place to start.
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