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Mac or PC for Game Audio?

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Hi there, I'm looking at investing in a sort of small (and cheap) home studio. And with that, a desktop computer to replace my fairly cheap Windows laptop.

 

What I'm looking to know is are there any specific benefits to game audio for either Mac or PC? I would assume that PC's might have an advantage due to game developers tending to use PC's as well, but looking at Logic also tempts me towards a Mac. 

 

What are your thoughts / experiences with this? (And please say PC so I don't have to pay out for a Mac tongue.png)

 

Thanks for reading smile.png

 

 

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I use a Mac for everything audio and everyone I know does this. I don't use Logic tho, I use Pro tools which for some reason bug like crazy on my windows 8 but works perfectly fine on my iMac.

 

But I don't think the difference is that big at the end of the day. That's like Pro Tools and Cubase it's pretty much the same but Pro Tools is more used.

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Hi there, I'm looking at investing in a sort of small (and cheap) home studio. And with that, a desktop computer to replace my fairly cheap Windows laptop.

 

If you're looking for cheap, then PC or an old(er) Mac is the way to go.

 

 

 

What I'm looking to know is are there any specific benefits to game audio for either Mac or PC? I would assume that PC's might have an advantage due to game developers tending to use PC's as well, but looking at Logic also tempts me towards a Mac.

 

Mac's OS handles memory, as it relates to audio processing, better than PCs do. PCs can get the job done, for sure, but when I was running two studios, one at home and one at work, I found my PC didn't perform as well as the Mac computers. Both systems were about the same specs and age so it was a somewhat even comparison.

 

What are your thoughts / experiences with this? (And please say PC so I don't have to pay out for a Mac tongue.png)

 

I'd get a Mac if you're making home audio a business. If you have a proven track record of getting clients and (most importantly) getting paid. Otherwise if this is just a hobby or the start of a possible business, then I'd work with what you have or what you can more easily afford. When I started my audio business, I went with what I had then slowly added or replace gear over the years. It took a while but now I've gone into zero business debt and have built a pretty respectable studio.

Edited by nsmadsen

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Great, thanks for all the advice!

 

It looks like I'm just going to build myself a PC as I'm still just a hobbyist. Hopefully I'll start making some money from it, then I'll probably upgrade to a Mac. 

 

Thanks again

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I've been fine with Mac, although some orchestral tools get a bit clunky in Logic Pro 9. I assume its something that's been addressed in Logic X (but haven't upgraded myself). So far i've been able to get by though, just have to bounce heavy sample instruments sometimes to take the strain off the system.

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Sounds more like an issue with your system specs and less with Logic. Even with Logic 9, I could create full, highly complex arrangements. What I hated about Logic 9, more than anything else, was having a 32-bit and 64-bit version with different feature sets. Thankfully, Logic Pro X fixes that.

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Honestly, if the end goal is to get a mac, and this machine doesn't have to pull double-duty as, say, a gaming PC, then just get a cheapish mac-mini and max out the RAM using a third-party source (Such as OWC). A reasonably configured Mac Mini is going to be not much more expensive than a reasonable spec BYO PC, and you don't have to deal with the headache of potential parts incompatibility or DOA parts having to be RMA'd before you have a working machine. Granted, such things are rare occurrence, but it can really take the wind out of your sails when it happens.

 

Then, consider that you might have to re-buy or re-license your software when you switch platforms, in addition to learning a new working environment and its associated workflows -- I suggest you'll be better off just starting with a Mac if that's the end goal.

 

If you live in/near an urban center, your local craigslist probably has a number of mac minis for around $500 (I see these all the time near Seattle) that are upgraded beyond the current least-expensive retail spec. The only minor caveat I have, is that if you do buy a new retail unit, its suspected that a haswell-based refresh should be happening before the end of this month, so you may want to hold off until then. I also see plenty of Xeon Mac Pros of various vintage sometimes for sub-$500.

Edited by Ravyne

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