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Elitis

Frameworks vs native API's?

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Elitis    107

I'm not a big fan of drag and drop type frameworks like qt, so I was wondering how often do game developers use frameworks? I'd assume it isn't often since game development can require precise control over things, but I thought I'd ask. 

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Hodgman    51234

From my professional work experience -- it's 100% of the time.

 

However, sometimes instead of using public frameworks, they're developed internally. In those cases, there will be a small team of people who develop the framework (wrapping up the native APIs), and then the actual game team will make the game using these frameworks.

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SeanMiddleditch    17565

I'm not a big fan of drag and drop type frameworks like qt, so I was wondering how often do game developers use frameworks? I'd assume it isn't often since game development can require precise control over things, but I thought I'd ask.


A lot of modern games are like 75% middleware. Havok for instance has a demo game engine made up almost entirely of their own middleware product. RAD Game Tools also sells a large number of different middlewares. There are whole companies built around a single middleware toolset like Umbra or SpeedTree or FaceGen. Even a few Open Source middleware projects have had some success like Bullet or Ogre. Then of course there's the whole bit where many games are made with an entire "off the shelf" engine made by another company, be it Unreal, CryTek, Unity, Gamebryo, or whatever. And let's not forget all the little Open Source libraries that almost everyone uses like zlib and dozens of others.

Very few companies have their own "AAA level" in-house engine built entirely from the ground-up with no middleware.

I haven't seen Qt specifically used a lot in games myself but then most significant engines have histories that predate modern incarnations of Qt (where it actually become vaguely relevant to games). I've heard of it being used for some tools, though. More often I've seen custom GUI toolkits used if a company builds an editor/toolset into the game itself.

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Buster2000    4310

I actually worked at a company at the beginning of the last gen that had been using Gamebryo as middleware for their previous titles.  When a new tech lead took over he decided that they would ditch the third party engine and develop everything in house for the new xbox 360 and Wii.  The first game the company worked on was a high school sim aimed at girls.  It took three years and tons of man hours to develop the tech and the game. 

When we finally approached publishers such as Activision and Ubisoft they said yes we love it its the most technically acomplished title of this genre.  However the amount of money they were offereing was just enough to pay the development teams salary for 2 months. 

Why so little money?  Because every other developer out there could churn these games out for the wii using Gamebryo or Unreal and chinese art outsourcing companies in only a few weeks.

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fir    460

From my non-professional work experience -- it's 0% of the time.

 

Most of my time i spent building my  own framework or native winapi

(not even one dependency as far only system dll's)

 

(though LatER it depends how you understand native api, for example i

will probably be using glew and freeglut when developing on

opengl - because i  revriting glew seem would be to be boring,

also when i will be doing sound i am not sure if i will stay with 

winapi or use some avaliable lib for playing sound)

Edited by fir

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