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samsonite133

The gaming industry, advice!

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I am currently 14 years old, however I am interested in working in the gaming industry. However I have zero expirence with programming and little expirence with art design on computers. I do play a handful of games from triple A titles like bf4 on pc  to indie games like insurgency standalone and rising storm. I have always wanted to have  a taste for doing something along the lines of creating textures and level design and or weopen animations like reloading and shooting. Through research I found many people to have worked long hours starting off as things like game testing were the pay is bad and the labour is intensive, but I was just loooking for insight and opinions on things like; how easy it is to find a job, pay, hours of work, enjoyable, stressfull,  and is it a longterm career that is worth looking into, what education do I need.

also a side note Is would it be good to start small and purchase game maker and create a 2d platformer, me and my freidn are interested in making a game like spelunky and possibly finding a way to sell it.

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Thank you so much, Gaming isnt just a huge hobby for me, it greatly interest me as the thought of someone else enjoying the work that I did is awesome! Especialy if you see a bunch of reviews  on youtube of it, then maybe il get a sense of joy and value in life and have a career I actualy like. Recently I really took interest into going to the game industry although its been floating around in my head for while. After watching the movie indie gamer it made me research a whole about gaming careers, this is something I am passionate about, and when I am passionate about something I  learn 10x faster than something I am not interested in and I have drive! I greatly appreciate your help, but lets say I wanted to specificaly design textures and graphics like lighting or effects more in the animation and art part, what do you think I would need. side note, when I generaly draw on papper picture it is something im terrible at however I have a great imagination hopefuly this wont affect computer art? I know I am still young however after getting into highschool it hit me il need to choose a career path soon! more detailed insight would be apreciated, such as personal expirences like any struggles, or job expirences that are good and or bad to tell?

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Like everyone already said, you should start learning a programming language. Start with making very small project.

When i was a teen, i learned actionscript during a summer, made a game and then publisher it on a gaming website. (I really like newgrounds back then)

 

Granted the first few games i made was total crap, it gave me some needed experience.

 

Try not to understand everything right aways. there is just way too much things to learn. Take it at your own pace.

Work your way from that. If you think about it, you can only get better and better.

 

And when you play a game, think about how it's made, how the guys did this-and-that.

 

Good luck smile.png

Edited by Sunsharior

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started first work in gaming at 28?! and isnt an art or computer art degree or whatever only a year or 2? I really need to think about this more, but through research I get mixed answeres which is why I came here. btw to be 100%  honest I never really loved art or hated it, it was ok for me considering I was never really good at writing or fine drawings (fidgety hands) but I had the creative ideas. Im starting to lean more towards level design, less animation more textures and building maps, something that sounds veryyyy apealing to me, like creating flora/vegatation to my liking or laying out the landscape like hills to creating an urban closed off battle place where balancing and thought is put in. I know interest change, and I have gone through diff phases were id want to do one thing and then a couple months later I change my mind, however this one has a unique spark to it! I spend so much time playing video games, and thinking how they couldve balanced the map out better, or made this look cooler, or  better optimized it. If I were to take a direct path into level design is that such a job that I could makee a living off of? or do I have to be able to do a variety of things to get a longterm job. Also if level design is something I can choose to only learn and do for the rest of my career, what kinda games generaly would a person deal with, very vague but I would liek personal expirence and thoughts! thanks a bunch. Finaly I have one more question, its rather dumb and kinda stupid, but what exactly is coding, and why is it refered to as a language, is it hard to learn, what are the types and what is coding used for?

Edited by samsonite133

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I'm moving this to the game industry Job Advice board, then will read further and perhaps respond.

1. Through research I found many people to have worked long hours starting off as things like game testing were the pay is bad and the labour is intensive,
but I was just loooking for insight and opinions on things like;
2. how easy it is to find a job,
3. pay,
4. hours of work,
5. enjoyable,
6. stressfull,
7. and is it a longterm career that is worth looking into,
8. what education do I need.


1. Actually, the hours are longer and more intense for those working in the studio (especially the programmers). In QA (test) the overtime pay can go into overtime and double overtime, so that's usually tightly controlled.
2. Not very.
3. It depends on which game job you have, and how long you've worked in the industry. Read the Game Industry Salary Survey. There's a link to it in this forum's FAQ section.
4. Ostensibly 40 hrs/wk, but most people in the industry wind up working more than that, especially towards the end of a project.
5. Yes.
6. Yes.
7. Worth is subjective. You get to decide this for yourself. Read the FAQs.
8. Depends on which job you want to go for. Read the FAQs.


isnt an art or computer art degree or whatever only a year or 2?


An art degree can be obtained in 2 years, but I prefer to see a 4-year degree.

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Toms post there reads like a girl your trying to chat up just politely answering enough of your questions just to be nice, but leaving you under no illusion of that your getting nothing from her. OP is 14 man, elaborate on your answers a bit more than just 'yes' and 'not very.' 

 

On topic:

 

One thing you need to remember here, and is key to any role you find yourself in, is that you have to love it. You have to love to code. You have to love to draw. You have to love game design etc. It's what your going to be doing for, perhaps, the rest of your life and this industry evolves at a rapid pace so you need to be able to keep up and learning new things quickly (but that comes with experience). 

 

Honestly, don't put too much faith into a degree. Whilst yes they might be useful, a lot of employers want to see how skilled you are in your respective area. Who cares if you got a 1st class degree from a swanky university. Any employer worth their salt will still offer you an interview as long as you have passion and can show case some of your work. When I was at uni I learned more doing projects in my spare time than the classes I did at uni. Partly as I was doing things I was interested in and partly as I'm not the best in those sorts of learning environments (classes / lectures etc).

 

I'm not saying you shouldn't go, but I am saying don't worry too much about it.

 

Another key concept is networking. Try and get your face known in your local game dev scene. I know a lot of indie companies and friends who have hired people / got work purely because they knew someone who knew someone. So keep your people skills up. 

 

Finally, for your own game, pick up the free copy of Unity and use C#. I use both professionally and you can do anything you want with it, including non game related subjects. The website also offers some of the best documentation and tutorials i've ever seen in relation to code and game development. 

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He's only 14 I think he should definitely go for a degree, he has plenty of time. He just needs to know that he will need to work on his own on the side.

 

Degree + Talent + HardWork > Talent + HardWork in the mind of HR people

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Toms post there reads like a girl your trying to chat up just politely answering enough of your questions just to be nice, but leaving you under no illusion of that your getting nothing from her. OP is 14 man, elaborate on your answers a bit more than just 'yes' and 'not very.' 

 

On topic:

 

One thing you need to remember here, and is key to any role you find yourself in, is that you have to love it. You have to love to code. You have to love to draw. You have to love game design etc. It's what your going to be doing for, perhaps, the rest of your life and this industry evolves at a rapid pace so you need to be able to keep up and learning new things quickly (but that comes with experience). 

 

Honestly, don't put too much faith into a degree. Whilst yes they might be useful, a lot of employers want to see how skilled you are in your respective area. Who cares if you got a 1st class degree from a swanky university. Any employer worth their salt will still offer you an interview as long as you have passion and can show case some of your work. When I was at uni I learned more doing projects in my spare time than the classes I did at uni. Partly as I was doing things I was interested in and partly as I'm not the best in those sorts of learning environments (classes / lectures etc).

 

I'm not saying you shouldn't go, but I am saying don't worry too much about it.

 

Another key concept is networking. Try and get your face known in your local game dev scene. I know a lot of indie companies and friends who have hired people / got work purely because they knew someone who knew someone. So keep your people skills up. 

 

Finally, for your own game, pick up the free copy of Unity and use C#. I use both professionally and you can do anything you want with it, including non game related subjects. The website also offers some of the best documentation and tutorials i've ever seen in relation to code and game development. 

Short answers for simple questions are okay in my opinion...

 

But anyway, many people like to see a degree. If you have two simular applicants, but one has a degree, you will choose that one. You can assume people with a CS degree at least want to work a bit and know a lot of programming, design etc. A portfolio will definitely help but a degree is probably the best way to go for somebody who's only 14 years old (even though university can be very boring).

 

Finally, your last few lines read like advertisement... There are a lot of very good developer tools out there and Unity is not one of the most cheap, easy or small engines out there. I'm not insulting Unity, it's a great engine. But for a beginner who has also a lot of interest in art too, I would recommend Gamemaker. It's very cheap, easier to start than Unity and probably better suited for small games made by only one or a few people. 

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