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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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How do i become a writer?

6 posts in this topic

I mean i know how to actually write. Every company website i go on keeps asking for experienced writers (seniors etc). How should i start off? Should i go for smaller companies (indies? There are alot in my City, Vancouver)?  In my opinion i have the skills. Should i like go on IndieDB/ModDB and do freelance work? Someone give me some pointers? I'm a begineer (Almost finished HS. Going to University).

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I mean, I know how to actually write. Every company website that I go on keeps asking for experienced writers (seniors, etc.). How should I start off? Should I go for smaller companies (indies? There are a lot in my City, Vancouver)?  In my opinion I have the skills. Should I, like, go on IndieDB/ModDB and do freelance work? Can someone give me some pointers? I'm a beginner (Almost finished HS. Going to University).

Just start writing for yourself and putting your work out in the public realm for practice, and to get feedback. You can then offer your services to indies (or larger companies), using this previously published work as a portfolio so that they can see your skills. From there you can point people to both your public portfolio, and to your experience/history.
 
Sorry to nit-pick, but there's several grammar and spelling mistakes in your post -- when applying for a writing position, those small mistakes would probably result in an instant rejection, so make sure to double proof-read everything when asking around for work cool.png

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I mean, I know how to actually write. Every company website that I go on keeps asking for experienced writers (seniors, etc.). How should I start off? Should I go for smaller companies (indies? There are a lot in my City, Vancouver)?  In my opinion I have the skills. Should I, like, go on IndieDB/ModDB and do freelance work? Can someone give me some pointers? I'm a beginner (Almost finished HS. Going to University).

Just start writing for yourself and putting your work out in the public realm for practice, and to get feedback. You can then offer your services to indies (or larger companies), using this previously published work as a portfolio so that they can see your skills. From there you can point people to both your public portfolio, and to your experience/history.
 
Sorry to nit-pick, but there's several grammar and spelling mistakes in your post -- when applying for a writing position, those small mistakes would probably result in an instant rejection, so make sure to double proof-read everything when asking around for work cool.png

 

 

I know. I'm on my ipod so.........

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Sorry to nit-pick, but there's several grammar and spelling mistakes in your post -- when applying for a writing position, those small mistakes would probably result in an instant rejection, so make sure to double proof-read everything when asking around for work cool.png

 

Just to concur with Hodgman, this is an important issue. The mistakes in your post noticeably jump out. Normally I tune those flaws out (it's the internet after all!), but when someone is saying they have skill as a writer, but their everyday writing doesn't vouch for them...

 

To put it by way of analogy, when I hang around artists, even their five-minute doodles have quality to them. They throw away art I'd hang on a wall (despite my supplications and entreaties dry.png).

If you're a writer, even your five-minute posts should be well above the average level of quality (or lack thereof) of the internet.

 

You shouldn't be a grammar-nazi nitpicking others' posts (unless, like in this thread, they come asking for advice wink.png), but you should nit-pick your own posts. If you don't know how something is spelled, look it up instantly. Don't misspell it and plan to look it up later, because each misspelling will lock in that misspelling further in your mind.

Same with grammar, capitalization, etc...

 

[b][Edit:][/b] Ah, well, there's some leeway granted for when posting from certain devices. Just don't make any job-offers like that! laugh.png

Edited by Servant of the Lord
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I mean i know how to actually write. Every company website i go on keeps asking for experienced writers (seniors etc). How should i start off? Should i go for smaller companies (indies? There are alot in my City, Vancouver)?  In my opinion i have the skills. Should i like go on IndieDB/ModDB and do freelance work? Someone give me some pointers? I'm a begineer (Almost finished HS. Going to University).

 

As some have said, to be a writer, one must write.  Whatever your preferred medium of writing is (stories, articles, scripts, etc.), start composing regularly.  Make it a hobby and always look to improve your ability.  

 

It is also crucial that you put your work out there to be read.  Blogs are great and free.  I would recommend looking into sites that welcome user content and have people willing to read and critique your work as critical feedback is a must.  If your main source of it thus far has been yourself your friends and your high school teachers, that's not enough.  You need people that are willing to tear apart your work to force you to improve.  

 

Keep writing, build a portfolio of your best pieces, and don't settle for less than your best.  You're welcome to submit yourself or your work for freelance publishing, though it will likely be some time before you're going to be paid for it.  If you come across  an offer to write for free, take it.  It's experience and a good way to make connections.  I'm not speaking from experience, but I expect nearly all paid freelance writers have previous relationships with the editors that hire them.  The best way develop these kinds of relationships is to get your work out there.  Since you're going on to university, definitely have a look at any school connected outlets or writer's groups.

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