Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
Chun-I

The functions on game scoring system

This topic is 2075 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Hi there,

 

I am a PhD student from Taiwan, and am working on a study on game scoring system.

My study will begin from finding out the functions of the scoring system in order to make a taxonomy of scoring system.

Here are the functions I currently found in two different perspective - game designer's perspective and player's perspective.

I will be glad if anyone can figure out any other functions that I might missed.

Also, if the following explanations are not clear enough, please let me know as well. Thank you!smile.png

 

Goal: The score can be the object of the game. 
Guide: The score can guide the player to do something or to make adjustment. 
Feedback: The score can be a positive or negative feedback.
Extend the game life: The score can induce the player to stay in the game longer. 
Measurement: The score is a scale of an abstract concept.
Personality: The score can make a distinction among the similar individual. 
Advertisement: The score can be an advertisement in order to attract more people to join the game.
Limitation: The score can restrict the player's behavior in a range of value.
Access: The score can help the player to access a new level/world.
Achievement: The score can let the player to set up his/her goal. 
Progression: The score is a process for reaching another status/level. 
Status: The score can tell the player where he/she stand.
Identity/Role: The score can represent an identity/role.
Convertible: The score can be converted from a currency/points/entity to another currency/points/entity.
Shareable: The score can be shared through internet. 
 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement

Protection: in most of my games (multiplayer) I use score as a protection of weaker players (not allowed to attack a target that is too low score compared to yours)

Complexity unlocker: I also use it as an artificial determiner if the player is familar with the game enough to introduce more advanced features/complex rules (below certain score some game rules might not apply to the player).

Leveling playing field between skilled and unskilled players: I frequently add more penalties to players who have high score and grant some bonuses to those with low score (the premise is that unskilled should have it easier and skilled have it more difficult, this way they always would have a challenge no matter their skill level)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Protection: in most of my games (multiplayer) I use score as a protection of weaker players (not allowed to attack a target that is too low score compared to yours)

Complexity unlocker: I also use it as an artificial determiner if the player is familar with the game enough to introduce more advanced features/complex rules (below certain score some game rules might not apply to the player).

Leveling playing field between skilled and unskilled players: I frequently add more penalties to players who have high score and grant some bonuses to those with low score (the premise is that unskilled should have it easier and skilled have it more difficult, this way they always would have a challenge no matter their skill level)

 

Thanks, Acharis!
I've carefully thinking about your suggestion. 
However, they sounds like the extented mechanics of the "Status".
For instance the first one you've mentioned, protecting the weaker player indicates the player who is on the weaker status can get protection. The score seems doesn't have a direct function of the "Protection". And the second and the third either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


I've carefully thinking about your suggestion.
However, they sounds like the extented mechanics of the "Status".
For instance the first one you've mentioned, protecting the weaker player indicates the player who is on the weaker status can get protection. The score seems doesn't have a direct function of the "Protection". And the second and the third either.
These are not suggestions :D These are facts (from my games) :) Also "Protection" function is used in all games that have KoC as ancestor (used to be quite popular).

 

Score has a direct effect of granting protection. Maybe I will just write code, it will be easier to understand.

if( attacker->score > defender->score *3 ) error("Attack cancelled, too high difference in score.");

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 


I've carefully thinking about your suggestion.
However, they sounds like the extented mechanics of the "Status".
For instance the first one you've mentioned, protecting the weaker player indicates the player who is on the weaker status can get protection. The score seems doesn't have a direct function of the "Protection". And the second and the third either.
These are not suggestions biggrin.png These are facts (from my games) smile.png Also "Protection" function is used in all games that have KoC as ancestor (used to be quite popular).

 

Score has a direct effect of granting protection. Maybe I will just write code, it will be easier to understand.

if( attacker->score > defender->score *3 ) error("Attack cancelled, too high difference in score.");

 

 

Great ! that makes sense now, you reminded me that there is a bunch of  strategy web games give new player several protection hours to avoid being attacked.tongue.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These all seem to look at score on the 0 -> infinity or maximum scale.  What about score such as X alignment vs. Y alignment?  Good vs. evil is the most obvious example, with evil being negative, neutral being 0, and good being positive.  But there are many other options, like faction A vs. faction B vs. faction C, with all 3 being positive.  Or in a dating sim, some actions will please one date, some will please all dates, some will please one but displease others, and there can also be checkpoints; for example a checkpoint would be if a date falls in love with the player at a threshold number, the player's score with that date will never go below the threshold number even if he switches to pursuing a second date.

 

Also, what about gauges?  These are scores that fall over time, and the player periodically must do something to raise them so they don't hit 0.  The Sims series is all about this kind of gauge, as are most "babysitting" games.

 

Score can affect available dialogue or action options, then making a dialogue choice or taking an action can change the score, in an interactive story feedback loop.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scores can be competitively (Player A has more score than Player B, so Player A is winning) either as the metric of winning or to give one player some kind of powerup vs another player.

 

But scores can also be used cooperatively, shared between both players. Maybe they together need to collect X amount of points to progress, or maybe (if score is a currency) they have a shared/pooled currency. Or even experience-wise, some games have both players leveling up together by sharing experience equally (which I personally prefer, rather than one player advancing ahead of the other player).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How does the score abstraction of "loot" fit into your taxonomy? Many games are built around using items as score. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These all seem to look at score on the 0 -> infinity or maximum scale.  What about score such as X alignment vs. Y alignment?  Good vs. evil is the most obvious example, with evil being negative, neutral being 0, and good being positive.  But there are many other options, like faction A vs. faction B vs. faction C, with all 3 being positive.  Or in a dating sim, some actions will please one date, some will please all dates, some will please one but displease others, and there can also be checkpoints; for example a checkpoint would be if a date falls in love with the player at a threshold number, the player's score with that date will never go below the threshold number even if he switches to pursuing a second date.

 

Also, what about gauges?  These are scores that fall over time, and the player periodically must do something to raise them so they don't hit 0.  The Sims series is all about this kind of gauge, as are most "babysitting" games.

 

Score can affect available dialogue or action options, then making a dialogue choice or taking an action can change the score, in an interactive story feedback loop.

Thanks for your feedback...
I indeed notice the alignment which you mentioned such as "Black & White". It is composed of "Measurement "(e.g. success, fail, evil, good, strength) ,  "Identity/Role" (e.g. good god, evil god), "Manipulatable" depend on player's behavior, and "Progression"(e.g. being good god or evil god, being dead or alive). Perhaps I should modify "Progression" to "Tendency" should make more sense. 
 
For me, I would say gauge is like alignment as well(e.g. hungry and full, dirty and clean, sleepy and energetic). The difference between these two is it automatically fall or not.
 
The third one you mentioned is interesting! can you give me an example?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scores can be competitively (Player A has more score than Player B, so Player A is winning) either as the metric of winning or to give one player some kind of powerup vs another player.

 

But scores can also be used cooperatively, shared between both players. Maybe they together need to collect X amount of points to progress, or maybe (if score is a currency) they have a shared/pooled currency. Or even experience-wise, some games have both players leveling up together by sharing experience equally (which I personally prefer, rather than one player advancing ahead of the other player).

 

You are right ! Thanks a lot!
I missed  "Competitive", It is common in most of multi-player game.
 
But I can't think about which game has the second function, can you give me an example?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

GameDev.net is your game development community. Create an account for your GameDev Portfolio and participate in the largest developer community in the games industry.

Sign me up!