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vinnyvicious

Software rendering tutorials/examples

20 posts in this topic

ok.  you can make your whole game greyscale,   then have a material id,  and then its just colour operations on r g and b, and i bet you all the latest crazo games do it.

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i dont suggest to study these outdated technologies like the q2. those optimization tricks will not work any more, and keep in mind that we have superscalar cpu-s now. also remember that you will need an agressively multithreaded code to achieve fast speed with nice quality. just write your renderer, and if you find a part that is too slow, then meditate/study/doodle that practicular problem.

 

http://geri.comeze.com/darktower/

 

my last (software rendered) free game, done for a game competition. it uses ray tracing, runs playable in 320x160.

Edited by Geri
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Fabian Giesen also touches upon the same technique that I mentioned in my first post, that is rendering with half spaces. It's the approach best suited for a software renderer and is used in top of the class software driver implementations. To approach software rendering today with a scan line rasteriser is fun as a hobby project but will lead nowhere as the real speed comes with multi-threading and therefore from a binning or tiled based approach.

Edited by jbadams
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software rasterizer combined with gpu availability check is the best engine I can think of. And also, you can make software rasterizing into gpu SIMD, though bypassing general gl/dx vendor tweeks will mostly lead to lesser performance, it is possible to (out)perform it- or more correctly, have better operatibility available. Imagine you could alter triangle rasterization ruiles, so that you will process also pixels with its center out of edge but partialy touching edge, then you could do ++ best antialiasing on any surface or, particular draw call. It is for sure very worthy to implement rasterizing on software, wheather for learning, or for possible usage in the future.

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JohnnyCode: i disaggree. maybe in *theory*, you can get the biggest performance, but using gpgpu would so much limit the number of compatible systems and would make so many extra work and compatibility issue, it would basically double the required work, and would make the whole thing almost unsellable, becouse there is a limited number of users with proper computers to run it. maybe such minor works like antialiasing, and other various filters effectively can done with gpu in this case, but that would not significantly boost the rendering ,,pipeline'', and should be maked with the possibility to disable it and use the software fallback.

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There is a tutorial series by David Rousset:
http://blogs.msdn.com/b/davrous/archive/2013/06/13/tutorial-series-learning-how-to-write-a-3d-soft-engine-from-scratch-in-c-typescript-or-javascript.aspx

When it comes to ray-tracing (and since PBRT was already mentioned) I would suggest you have a look at Ray Tracing from the Ground Up by Kevin Suffern as, in my opinion, more beginner-friendly.

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